regulate marijuana like alcohol alaska legalization 2014
Ending Marijuana Prohibition

Alaska Marijuana Legalization Initiative Winning In Latest Poll

regulate marijuana like alcohol alaska legalization 2014Marijuana legalization is on the ballot in Alaska, which is the only state so far that has gathered enough signatures to put marijuana legalization on the ballot for the 2014 Election. If you support marijuana reform in Alaska or beyond, you should be paying close attention to what is going on up there, and should make a donation to the campaign. Alaska votes on this in August, so there’s a chance that even before the November election in other states, there could be three legal states in America.

A poll was recently released by the Alaska State House of Representatives ‘Annual Caucus Statewide Issues Poll‘. The poll asked the following question, and had the following result:

And now a few questions regarding ballot measures that will appear on the Primary ballot this August…

8) One ballot measure would legalize the recreational use of marijuana in Alaska. It would also set terms
for the regulation, taxation, and sale of marijuana. Please tell me, if the election were held today, would
you most likely vote yes to support legalizing marijuana for recreational use, or no to oppose legalizing
marijuana for recreational use?
Yes, support legalizing ……………………………………………………………….. 52%
No, oppose legalizing ………………………………………………………………… 44%
Unsure ………………………………………………………………………………………. 4%

As you can see, marijuana legalization is winning in the polls in Alaska right now. But the margin of victory is not that large, and victory is far from inevitable. If you are on the ground in Alaska, keep up the fight. If you live in Alaska or not, consider making a donation to the campaign at this link here.

  • Will this happen? “I just think marijuana’s going to revolutionize things in Alaska as much as oil ever did. The prospect for jobs and new business start-ups is phenomenal. All Alaskans should be excited about it,” disabled veteran and Alaska Hemp owner Bill Fikes told the Alaska Dispatch. With some “creative financing,” he’s anticipating a victory for legalization this year and is planning to start his own grow operation. Fikes thinks that by planning early, he can “try and at least get a little head start on the carpetbaggers” he envisions flocking to the state, like major corporations making millions in Colorado and Washington.

    More info: http://www.policymic.com/articles/86471/a-third-state-will-likely-legalize-marijuana-this-summer

  • seth

    I haven’t read much about the details of the ballot measure. Details like has a day been set in the ballot measure that specify exactly how long the Alaskan government will have to open up store for recreational sale? Are limits on how much a resident/non-resident can purchase? Whatever the case, if it passes I will be giving serious consideration to moving to Alaska. I’m going too denver at Seattle this summer to check it out. Between Seattle and Denver, right now I’d have to choose Denver.

  • wowFAD

    Keep in mind, more people live in Rhode Island than Alaska. For Alaska’s polling numbers to improve, the number of people who must be swayed are in the thousands, not millions. Census says 731k people, total.

    Personally, I find Alaska’s cannabis history fascinating.

    Alaska’s version of decriminalization had “virtually legalized” cannabis for several decades. They decriminalized to a $100 civil fine in the 70s. They dumped the civil fine altogether in 1982. Sadly, however, prescriptive moralists (mostly church folk, wasn’t politically partisan) tried to have it criminalized again throughout the 1980s and 1990s. There were a LOT of legal gymnastics for those decades, but cannabis remained (largely) decriminalized. Medical cannabis passed via ballot initiative in 1998. Attempts to fully legalize via ballot failed in 2000 and 2004, opposed heavily by religious organizations. In 2006, the “methijuana” recriminalization bill passed the legislature to make possession a Class C Felony with support on both sides of the aisle, despite 56% of the state opposing it, because the cannabis penalties were tacked onto a bill, late in the session, that was intended to deal primarily with Alaska’s huge meth problem (anyone who voted against it would have become pro-drugs in an election year).

    That about sums it up. Decades legal and political maneuvering — who knows how much money spent — all to control what 731k people can and can’t do with their own bodies.