Mar 042015
 March 4, 2015

texas medical marijuanaTexas State Representative David Simpson has introduced a bill that would eliminate all marijuana prohibition language from the laws in Texas. Texas HB 2165 would essentially regulate marijuana like tomatoes. Per the organization Republicans Against Marijuana Prohibition:

Representative Simpson’s HB 2165 harkens back to a time when government did not intervene in the control of marijuana. And you know what? It wasn’t a very scary time. The prohibition of marijuana was notoriously built on misinformation and hyperbole rather than facts and results.

When these laws haven’t worked for 80 years, is it really such a novel concept to simply remove them?

Representative David Simpson had the following to say about his effort, per The Joint Blog:

“We can’t fix all of the past wrongs caused by prohibition, but at least we can stop perpetuating them,” says Representative Simpson. “Current marijuana policies are not based on science or sound evidence, but rather misinformation and fear. All that God created is good, including marijuana. God did not make a mistake when he made marijuana that the government needs to fix.”

Simpson continues; “Let’s allow the plant to be utilized for good—helping people with seizures, treating warriors with PTSD, producing fiber and other products—or simply for beauty and enjoyment. Government prohibition should be for violent actions that harm your neighbor—not of the possession, cultivation, and responsible use of plants.”

Passing a bill that regulates marijuana like tomatoes is not an easy thing to do. And that is especially true in a state like Texas. Texas does not have an initiative system, which means that the only way to reform marijuana laws is via the Texas Legislature. But it’s a fight worth pursuing, and even if it just gets the conversation going, that will lay the ground work for a legalization effort that has a better chance of passing, such as regulating marijuana like alcohol.

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  18 Responses to “Bill Introduced In Texas That Would End Marijuana Prohibition”

  1.  

    You can’t argue with common sense. This is how a true Republican is supposed to act.

  2.  

    Too much too soon. Never going to go from illegal to completely legal in one fell swoop in Texas. Why waste your time with a bill that is going nowhere? Baby steps! In a state like Texas, it’s going to take quite a few baby steps over a long period of time to even get to the point of legal medical marijuana. Forget this legal marijuana non-sense and focus on reality Mr. Simpson.

    •  

      Rep. Simpson isn’t a marijuana activist. He is that rare, one in a million politician that actually believes in individual liberty. He stated very clearly that his actions are founded in his Christian principles. He has taken a bold, courageous stand, simply because it is the right thing to do.
      The law is wrong, remove it.

  3.  

    Lets go Texas!

  4.  

    Where and when do I vote for this?

    •  

      Its up to the legislation, we the people sadly don’t have a choice here in Texas.

      •  

        So the old white male conservatives are the only ones who get a legal say on if this passes? And I assume there’s no initiative process to change that law?

      •  

        As Pro-cannabis activists in Texas, our responsibility is to lobby the elected officials and influence them.

        Delivering votes, campaign donations (bribes) and supporting other “pet” issues of the Representative are some of the usual ways of playing ball in this political arena.

        Also if one happens to be a fellow church, lodge or club member with one of the Representatives, one can approach them as a brother / sister within that organization and persuade them from that perspective as well.

    •  

      You Don’t get a vote if you live in Texas. That’s not the way Texas works, even though the Republican controlled legislature is always yapping about less government intrusion on people’s lives.
      70% of Texans are for medical marijuana use or legalization, but the Legislature in Austin knows what’s best for you and will not let you self medicate in the privacy of your own home, but they will allow you to buy a case of vodka and get totally plastered in the privacy of your own home. Something’s wrong with that.

  5.  

    No more regulated than tomatoes is a unrealistic libertarian fantasy. This won’t pass.

  6.  

    It would nice to see the phrase “everything is bigger in Texas” come to fruition. That would be the biggest splash made in the nation if a state as red as Texas decided to regulate marijuana like tomatoes, which some have asked for in these forums.
    This is an ideal setting if it gets done and would ultimately make the rest of our legalization proposals look asinine by comparison.
    Governments, be them local, state, or federal, are usually too greedy to consider allowing the market to regulate itself, but it would benefit everyone if that ends up being the case.
    I have just made my peace with law makers wanting a piece of the action, but if Texas is fine with letting the people govern this industry, you can’t really argue against it.

  7.  

    FREE TEXAS ,STOP WASTING TAX PAYERS MONEY ON A WAR AGANST A PLANT . PROHIBITION IS THE PAST, ITS TIME FOR TEXAS TO STEP UP TO THE PLATE , LEGALIZE IT TAX AND REGULATE IT , IF THE PUBLIC HAD A CHANCE TO VOTE , WE WOULD WIN BY A LAND SLIDE .

  8.  

    I have thought for a long time marijuana should be treated like any other agricultural product. Regulation on the public market should be regulated and recreational marijuana could be a source of tax revenue. However, like alcohol and tobacco it can and should be cultivated by the private citizen for his own use. Tobacco can be grown for personal use and home brewing is a popular hobby.
    As a Texan I have the instinct to want most government to be handled at the town and county level and believe reduction in law when possible is best for all communities. I think that Texans regardless of their conservative views elsewhere should support the removal or marijuana from prohibited status for no reason other than it gives every citizen of Texas the ability to make one more free and conscience decision on their own. As Texans we demand this of our leadership and community members. We insist others whether private citizens or officials respect our privacy, space, property, and desire to make our own choices.

  9.  

    This is what our state of Texas needs. It is way overdue and hope it passes.

  10.  

    Republicans love to portray themselves as the champions of small government. They claim they are the party that supports less intrusion into our lives. But they are very selective about which freedoms they think we should be allowed.
    Finally, here is a Republican that actually believes in individual liberty.
    Unfortunately, his own party will not support him in this.

  11.  

    Texas needs more Grass Roots movement. We must grow! Let there be UV light. Free the plant. Respect. I just found my first spot in H-Town. Respect to the people who make it happen.
    http://www.aggressivegarden.com/apps/blog/entries/show/43889277-chikamasa-scissors

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