medical marijuana doctor
Medical Marijuana Policy

But I Am Not A Doctor

medical marijuana doctorBy John Knetemann

Recently, I was in Washington D.C. for the Students for Sensible Drug Policy Conference and Lobby Day, where hundreds of students gather to talk and learn about their passion for ending the Drug War. At the end of the conference, students make meetings with their senators and representatives in congress about particular issues concerning sensible drug policy. I did this, and got an interesting response from a senator’s staffer. While we were focusing on particular bills being presented in the House and Senate, I veered off on one of my conversations to ask about medical marijuana.

At the beginning of the meeting I asked about the Senator’s views on reforming drug policy, in general. I asked this question because the senator never seemed to say much about drug policy, and just swept the issue under the rug. But the answer I got was not surprising in the least. It was a wordy answer that didn’t mean much of anything, except I got one answer that I really wanted to capitalize on. The staffer told me that the Senator was against legalizing medical marijuana in my state. Shocker.

So I went on to ask why the senator wants to deny access from patients that could benefit greatly from medical marijuana, and that is where I got the answer that surprised me. The staffer explained to me that the senator was not a doctor and had no medical experience, therefore could not support legalizing medical marijuana… That has to be the absolute worst argument ever made against the legalizing of medical marijuana.

Because he has no medical experience? Well then he should support legalizing medical marijuana, and leave prescribing medical substances to doctors (AKA people that have a lot of experience with medicine). Legalizing medical marijuana doesn’t force certain patients to use it as a medication, it just allows doctors to use it as a tool that they prescribe to patients. Access to medical marijuana would only be allowed to people who are prescribed by medical professionals.

The staffer then tried to explain to me that in California there is a lot of abuse of medical marijuana and that a lot of people who don’t really need it end up having access to it. Sure, that might be true. But if that is the case, then we should criminalize pretty much all prescription drugs. If some people abusing a prescription is what’s holding us back from allowing medical marijuana then we should also prohibit any kind of opiate pain killer that is also abused (and much more dangerous). Not to mention, it just sounds absolutely ridiculous to punish people who actually need medical marijuana because other people seem to abuse it. We are punishing the innocent for the crimes of the guilty by making medical marijuana illegal for this reason.

I suggest that you try to get a meeting with your senator or representative and try to start the conversation on medical marijuana or legalizing marijuana. I think that you will find their reasons for prohibition are pretty weak.

  • Tim Cook

    We need to vote these ___ _____ out

  • Sarijuana

    Thanks for being there for us all! That Sen. is another very misguided ass.

  • flowerfarmer

    hell I already knew their argument against legalizing was ridiculous and weak. Thankyou for your efforts.

  • Guest

    Is the senator in this article John Thune? This is the most ignorant position on medical marijuana I’ve ever heard, and I really think you should expose this senator by name so people can oppose his future reelection.

  • We deserve better leadership than we (typically) get.

    • Jetdoc

      I’m REALLY tired of voting for the better of 2 evils!

    • David

      We also deserve better informed voters than we typically get.

  • Denny

    They’re elected, and mostly reelected, by the voters. This is yet another perfect example of why term limits should be implemented ASAP!
    Of course, the argument that almost immediately ensues is one that states “my representative is OK, yours is the problem.” While this may be accurate in a handful of instances that are meaningful to some voters, the country would be better off in the long run if we sent every representative back to the real world after a maximum of two terms in office. We don’t need career politicians; we do need more citizens getting involved in politics to the point of serving in office for a term or two in order to get another glimpse of how our system really works from the inside out. At least with scheduled turnover we, the benefactors of their decisions, would have a fighting chance.

    • Jetdoc

      Been saying that for years! Make YOUR Rep. COMMIT to the fact that HE will vote FOR “term limits” during his first term. If he doesn’t, he’s OUT! Next man up!

      • Denny

        Unfortunately, most of the politicians are afflicted with amnesia within 24 hours after arriving in DC.
        You can have them watch/listen to a video/audio of what they said and they’ll deny it insisting that it was “taken out of context” and blow it off.
        You’re exactly correct; we, the voters, have to make this happen in the voting booth, otherwise it’s never gonna happen.

    • David

      America already has “term Limit’s”. It’s called “voting”.

  • Johnny oneye

    The only abuse in Cal mmj
    Is LEO and lawyers who wont allow unfettered access to cannabis
    Wont allow sensible regulations
    Hooked on cannabis

  • David

    That answer is the same corn-pone answer Republican Senator Minority leader Mitch McConnell uses to deflect climate change questions. Simply insert “scientist” in the place of “Doctor”. Bingo!