canada marijuana
Ending Marijuana Prohibition

Canada Will Move To Legalize Marijuana Next Year

canada marijuana
(image via Canada.com)

By Phillip Smith

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, elected last fall, campaigned on a promise that his Liberal government would legalize marijuana. Now, we’re getting an idea of just when that is going to happen.

Speaking at the UN General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on Drugs Wednesday, Canadian Health Minister Jane Philpott said the government will introduce legislation to legalize and regulate marijuana in spring 2017.

“Our approach to drugs must be comprehensive, collaborative, and compassionate. It must respect human rights while promoting shared responsibility. And it must have a firm scientific foundation. In Canada, we will apply those principles with regard to marijuana,” she said.

“To that end, we will introduce legislation [to legally regulate marijuana] in spring 2017 that ensures we keep marijuana out of the hands of children and the profits out of the hands of criminals. While this plan challenges the status quo in many countries, we are convinced it is the best way to protect our youth while enhancing public safety.”

Canada’s is a parliamentary system, which generally means that if the government introduces a bill, it becomes law. There could be unforeseen bumps in the road, but it appears all but certain that the land of the maple leaf is soon going to become the land of the pot leaf, too.

In the meantime, government officials, including legalization point man former Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair, are emphasizing that until the law changes, marijuana remains illegal except for medicinal purposes. After a Canadian Supreme Court decision in March, medical marijuana users will be able to grow their own, a right that was taken away by the previous Conservative government.

But within a couple of years, any adult Canadian should be able to join them.

Article From StoptheDrugWar.orgCreative Commons LicensingDonate

  • skoallio

    Legalization is a DISASTER. I have charts to prove it. Norml and MPP has no fancy charts saying otherwise.

    If these charts are true, then legalization advocates CANT SAY…

    Teen pot use is down.
    Pot related emergency room visits are down.
    School expulsions from pot are down.
    Pot related traffic fatalities are down.
    Total traffic fatalities are down.
    Crime is down.

    EVERYTHING IS GETTING WORSE. There’s no record for legalization to run on. With Kevin Sabet as the face of the anti legalization movement, he cant be painted as an evil drug warrior like what was possible against Calvina Fay and Asa Hutchison. In every debate he makes legalization advocates look like fools. Its an embarrassment to be a legalization supporter.

    • NickyChuck

      Oooo look, it’s the troll with his troll charts again! You’re right, NORML and MPP do not have chart technology yet, and there aren’t charts posted every month to this site that contradict the BS you’re pushing. Drugs are bad, m’kay?

    • fatt_sam

      Switzerland got the average age of a heroin addict to 50 ish by legalising. Portugal saw a small spike, then use of all drugs down.

      Pre prohibition, there were 500 odd addicts in UK. Now nearly a million…

      There is one downside to legalising pot, it takes away an avenue for rebelious teens to break the law safely. But, that’s no reason to keep locking ppl up over mind altering substances.

      • Sinclair

        Here is an unbiased link about teen use the link shows that teen use is down from 15 years ago.
        People should be more concerned about the rise in teen opiates use.
        https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150915141045.htm

        • fatt_sam

          Thanks

          • fatt_sam

            Opiate use is a difficult issue. Pills get ppl into hard opiates that otherwise wouldn’t have touched anything like heroin. But, those pills shudn’t be made more difficult for ppl in serious pain to get hold of, which is the predictable reaction of the authorities.

            The main damage from an opiate habit is from the fact it’s illegal. Unpredictable strength, financing habit, time spent obtaining it, bad methods of consumption…

            Unfortunately we are a long way off from sensible attitudes to opiates.

      • saynotohypocrisy

        Not to worry, since it still won’t be legal for teenagers, it will still be a relatively safe way for them to rebel.

    • Bob Mylow

      Interesting funny NHTSA has no listings for cannabis related traffic deaths in their FARS reports all those numbers are made up by HIDTA which is fighting to keep funding for all it’s drug interdiction campaign’s. Most reports and studies funded by anti-drug agency or organization are granted on the contingent it reflects their views. Death throes of a dying myth.

    • Sinclair

      Why are you so against Marijuana legalization. Are you a black market seller? Or you just someone who like to troll this site and try to make yourself feel special? Anyone can make a chart doesn’t mean it’s true or accurate.

      • 2buds4me

        Maybe he’s a Sabet-Mole-Troll
        Love how the trolls always point to “Any Use” as “Cannabis Abuse” , also referred to as “Addicts”

        • Sinclair

          This really shows that he does not know what he is talking about. (Skoallio).

    • AntiIgnorant

      You are so absurd. I am pretty sure you are a plant to make prohibitions look bad. Keep up the good work. Your efforts haven’t gone unnoticed.

    • jontomas

      That chart by itself has little meaning, except to denote which areas of the country are more enlightened. – I bet the same chart of teen alcohol use would be the inverse of that one. – So those states where near harmless marijuana is chosen are better off.

      The main thing is use, by everyone, has always been high in Colorado and similar states. Nothing wrong with that either, of course. – Every person who switches from addictive, very harmful alcohol to near harmless marijuana improves their health tremendously – as well as the lives of their family and community.

      Russ Belville ground up Kevin Sabet and crushed him under his hemp heel.

    • Been around

      Your stats are completely and comprehensively FALSE.
      Go back to your drawing board (but much better yet, do the RESEARCH) and capture the FACTS, FACTS, FACTS from UNBIASED SOURCES.

  • Jon Alan

    Well. Lettuce all go to Alabama.

    CBS NEWS Sellouts put out this trash Reefer Madness:

    Amurikkka is gettin’ so grown-up, idn’t it?

    iStock
    Heavy marijuana use in the late teen years puts men at a higher risk for death by age 60, a new long-term study suggests.

    Swedish researchers analyzed the records of more than 45,000 men beginning in 1969 and 1970. The scientists from the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm reported that 4,000 died during the 42-year follow-up period, and men who’d used marijuana heavily at ages 18 and 19 were 40 percent more likely to die by age 60 compared to guys who hadn’t used the drug.

    The authors of the new study, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, said the findings contradict previous research involving the same group of men.

    But this study was longer and participants might have reached an age where the long-term effects of cannabis were taking a toll on health, said addiction expert Scott Krakower, an assistant unit chief of psychiatry at Zucker Hillside Hospital, in New Hyde Park, NY.

    “Cannabis users have poorer health in general. You’d expect there to be increased mortality risk,” Krakower told CBS News. He pointed to another long-term study linking early heavy marijuana use with lung cancer, and a second study that associates the drug with increased heart problems.

    Sponsor content from Nordstrom
    IVY PARK Is Now Available at Nordstrom
    “Marijuana users generally may have poorer diets and they might be tobacco smokers. There’s an increased linkage between weed and tobacco,” said Krakower.

    Dr. Kevin Hill, a member of the American Psychiatric Association’s Council on Addiction Psychiatry, told CBS News, “One of the key messages from a study like this comes down to two words: dose matters.”

    The study looked at teenagers who had used marijuana more than 50 times.

    Hill, an assistant professor of psychiatry at McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School, said most people who use marijuana don’t use it at heavy levels. “Nine percent of adults use it at that level and develop an addiction.”

    He said the study is limited because it didn’t provide specifics about heavy use and continued use.

    Using marijuana earlier in life is linked to poorer psychological health, he said, and that can contribute to more health problems down the road.

    “It is well-established that if you begin using at an early age and use a lot then, there are significant negative outcomes particularly in terms of mental health and it wouldn’t be a surprise for that to translate to long-term health problems,” Hill said.

    Earlier cannabis use is linked to cognitive problems. Hills said, “One 2012 study showed early, regular use of marijuana – the kind of level they describe in this study — led to an eight point decline in IQ over time.”

    He said it’s also associated with worse anxiety and depression, adding, “If you start using marijuana at an early age, you’re more likely to express a psychotic disorder.”

    In this day and age of continued debate over marijuana policy issues, Hill said, “This kind of study is incredibly important. We don’t have definitive answers, but it underscores if you are using heavily, you’re probably going to have some negative consequences.”

    © 2016 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

    Facebook
    Twitter
    Pinterest
    Email
    WhatsApp
    Play
    COMPLETE COVERAGE
    Marijuana Nation
    Recommended

    All rights reserved.

    THE ALL NEW
    CBS News App for Android®

  • Sinclair

    Moving to Canada! !!!!!!laughing

    • AntiIgnorant

      Me too!

      • Closet Warrior

        Me 3!!!!!!

  • AntiIgnorant

    I think it will be fully legal in the U.S. by 2020. What are we waiting for?

    • skoallio

      they said the same thing in 1970

      • saynotohypocrisy

        Yes, but certainly not in 1980, or 1990, or 2000, or even 2010. But don’t let me interfere with your wasting your time here.

  • jontomas

    Trudeau has likely timed this so he can ride the wave of prohibition destruction caused by November’s vote in the U.S. He is right. When California and some others join the Free States at year’s end, it will cause the collapse of the crumbling federal marijuana prohibition. — The signs are everywhere. – The DEA just approved of medical marijuana!

    • jontomas

      The DEA Just Approved a Way to Smoke Marijuana Legally

      http://fortune.com/2016/04/22/dea-medical-marijuana/

      • Closet Warrior

        It’s a PTSD experiment trial, far from legal but it’s a step forward

    • Been around

      It’s certainly a plausible scenario, Jon. It truly is JUST A MATTER OF TIME before there is just too much consensus and pressure by the public masses, bolstered by common-sense and open-minded representatives in our government. There are many, many in Congress that do not fit this description HOWEVER; there are MORE NOW THAN EVER that DO fully and publicly support LEGALIZATION and the FREEDOM-OF-CHOICE to use or not use.
      Practicing true “democracy” is a tough, tough task when there are so many “restricted” or “closed” minds to what FREEDOM truly means. There is NO REASON WHATSOEVER that any legal citizen of age cannot CULTIVATE THEIR OWN, for both medical and recreational purposes.
      It’s time we get the MONEY and ULTERIOR MOTIVES out of “OUR” government, don’t ya think ???
      Peace.

      • jontomas

        Right. Marijuana prohibition was a fraud from its beginning in 1937.

        >>>”There is NO REASON WHATSOEVER that any legal citizen of age cannot CULTIVATE THEIR OWN”

        Well, there are some powerful reasons, just not good ones. – Police and prosecutors build their careers and empires on the monstrous persecution. Industries like alcohol and pharmaceuticals don’t want the competition. Other interests like the drug treatment/testing industry and the prison industries depend on it for their life’s blood. Many banks and shaky corporations couldn’t exist without the laundered money.

        The billions of dollars made by drug gangs have not been buried in the ground. They are invested in legitimate business, creating more powerful support of this war on Americans. – Add to these all the ancillary industries that sell to or service the above groups, and you begin to understand the enormity of the greed-driven resistance.

        • saynotohypocrisy

          “The billions of dollars made by drug gangs have not been buried in the ground.”

          To focus on the cartels for a moment – We’ll have to fix more than marijuana prohibition to deal with the cartels’ power, but demonstrating how unnecessary and unworthy cannabis prohibition has been is a crucial way for drug war reformers to establish credibility that can then be used to tackle the harder issue of how best to deal with hard drugs.

      • jontomas

        I responded. Perhaps it will appear after ‘review.’

  • brtova

    Time to make vacation plans!

  • Ted Mishler

    Why not legalize it immediately?

    next year. next year, sounds like a bunch of lies to me

    excuse me while i go toke

    • saynotohypocrisy

      It’s not lies, it’s just bureaucracy, setting up a distribution system, and working with the provinces and RCMP
      to ease their concerns. He doesn’t want to legalize possession until there is a legal way to obtain it, and doesn’t want medical dispensaries to temporarily be able to sell to rec users like Oregon did. I wish he would take those interim steps, but I don’t see any reason to question his sincerity.

      • Ted Mishler

        the war against the people of this country is high treason you know, and not allowing people who do cannabis employment with urine screens is a discrimination all FREEDOM loving people of this country can do with out, but I suppose you know that, so i will shut up

  • Johnny Bloomington

    Good news! Where’s the beef? Details of the rules.

  • Closet Warrior

    Legal in the whole country and patients can grow their own too…It’s time to move, eh?