Cats And Dogs Like Marijuana Too

 Posted by at 6:15 PM on December 28, 2011  Marijuana Science
Dec 282011
 December 28, 2011

cat with jointDogs like marijuana more than cats.

I meant to write about this topic yesterday, but unfortunately life seemed to get in the way of my blogging pursuits again and there just wasn’t enough time. I have to confess, much to the outrage of animal lovers that read this blog, that I have blown marijuana smoke at my pets before. I’m not one of those people that force my pets to inhale my marijuana smoke. But if they come around when I am smoking marijuana, I kind of assume that they want in on the session. My cat will usually run away before the smoke hits her, but sometimes she just sits in the marijuana smoke and looks quite content.

All of my marijuana consuming friends and family ‘share’ their marijuana smoke with their pets. Some of them are a little forceful with it, which I don’t agree with. However, I don’t personally see anything wrong with second hand marijuana smoke if my pets come around for it, and it’s not in excess. Feel free to disagree with me in the comments section, because like always, I’d rather be proven wrong and facilitate discussion than to be right and never hear anything from anyone (that’s what blogging is about, isn’t it?).

There have been quite a few articles written lately about this topic. The first one that I saw was written by Dale Rodebaugh, for the Durango Herald. Here are some excerpts from the article, coming straight from the veterinarians:

Some veterinarians in Durango have seen a spike in the number of dogs poisoned by marijuana since the proliferation of medical marijuana dispensaries made the drug more accessible.

“We used to see maybe one case a year,” said Stacee Santi, a veterinarian at Riverview Animal Hospital. “Now we’re seeing a couple a month.”

Jennifer Schoedler, a veterinarian at Alpine Animal Hospital, has seen incidents of dogs getting into marijuana since she came to Durango in 1998.

“Dogs love the stuff,” Schoedler said. “I’ve seen them eat the buds, plants, joints and marijuana in food.”

Eric Barchas, a veterinarian in San Francisco, says on his website that he treats “stoned dogs” on a regular basis.

“Serious, long-term health consequences and fatality from marijuana intoxication are essentially unheard of,” Barchas writes on his site. “However, pets that are exposed to marijuana may display anxiety and are prone to ‘bad trips.’ They may lack the coordination to consume food and water.”

Vet Eric Barchas has on his website an entire entry dedicated to the subject, “Marijuana Intoxication in Cats and Dogs.”

Another article that I found was on the Huffington Post. My favorite excerpt from this article is “According to a 2002 peer-reviewed study on the subject, Dogs account for approximately 96% of all exposures to the drug, while cats–apparently more likely to just say no–comprise 3%, and other creatures round out the remaining 1%.” I suppose I could have just sited the study, but I’m a fan of the Huff, so I wanted to give them credit for bringing this to my attention!

I would like to point out to animal advocates (who are probably calling for my death at this point!) that “According to a study by the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals’s Animal Poison Control Center, only two deaths out of 250 pet pot cases have been reported — a cat and a horse, both of whom had other outstanding medical issues” (SF Weekly). I couldn’t imaging ‘sharing’ marijuana smoke with a horse…or perhaps it was just fed to the horse? True story – I once smoked marijuana with a high school friend that owned a spider monkey, and ‘shared’ my marijuana smoke with the monkey. He absolutely loved it! If you’re out there Andrew, that is still the craziest marijuana session I have ever had…

 

About Johnny Green

Johnny Green is a marijuana activist from Oregon. He has a Bachelor's Degree in Public Policy. Follow Johnny Green on Facebook and Twitter. Also, feel free to email any concerns.
  • Kyle Outz

    my dog and my boys cat both love it, my dog knows it as scoobie snacks and the cat will put her head in the bag darn fiends

  • lee

    during the Vietnam war water buffalo would head straight for the marijuana patch when shit hit the fan near them. Hmmm. So did most of the GIs. lol. Cambodian Red Bud ooh raah LMAO

  • Cheryl

    My black cat loves it. He’s my smoke buddy. It helps my Bengals glaucoma. White female cat hates it.

  • Struggling mom

    What I’d like to know is if the benefits are the same for dogs as people. I have a beautiful 3 year old Rottweiler who is in chronic pain from some bone malformation and he doesn’t get around very well and he crys a lot. This makes me sad because he’s still a young dog. He’s on meloxicam and tramadol from his vet. He loves weed. When I’m trimming he will eat little buds I give him. Snaps em up! So I’m wondering if this would help for pain management. I’m currently toying with the idea of putting my 8 son with autism on non/psych Cbds. I think weed is a wonderful cure all. Only thing is I don’t know how to extract the Cbds and am not sure if animals tolerate marijuana the same way. Any thoughts?

  • T_R_0_N

    I would hate to stir up a stink with the aspca but if it’s good for our joint pains i bet it is for theirs too!! But I would think a little laced butter in their food or something edible would be in order — hell I’m no expert just my .02.

  • Fern”hood Girl

    Marijuana toxicity in dogs is not funny, cool nor should it be taken lightly. It’s irresponsible to leave a bag of weed layin’ around when you have kid’s or pets. It happened to me, the vet wanted $850 to keep him – a 25lb puppy – on IV overnight! That’s insane! I opted for the $300 version, make him throw up, which doesn’t always work (and didn’t in my case) as weed is an anti nausea drug. Then administer charcoal to absorb toxins. I had no idea when I rushed him to vet what he’d actually gotten into. All I knew was he could no longer walk, and had pee running out of him uncontrollably, scary!! So it cost me the weed and $330. Simply avoid giving weed to you dog, on purpose or accidentally! And blowing smoke in an animal’s passage way intentionally is ABUSE, straight up animal cruelty. An act reserved for moron’s at best.

  • joe

    I named my cat Cheech…….he’s an orange tabby when I got him at 8 weeks old first day I got him I was smirking a bowl and my cat walked right into the massave cloud of smoke and stayed there and waited for The next smoke cloud but cheech would only smoke when I was smoking and that is why his name is cheech!!!

  • moostafa

    I have a Pomeranian. And I’m a medical patient. Every time I go into my room to trim she devours the clippings. I can’t keep her away and when I try to she gets pissed at me lol. I also had another pom who passed away do to medical issues and he loved to eat them as well. He would Getty mad of I didn’t share it was crazy one day I didn’t share with him and he figured out how to open my desk drawer and snatched my sac and ate my buds lol I was mad but he was cool enough to leave me enough for a joint lol. I never force pets to do any thing but my poms will bug me of I don’t share. They literally climb on my chest and inhale the smoke when I blow out. I also had chinchillas Anna omg they loved to nibble on nugs. Is a plant in comes from the ground grows in any place toy want. Its been around longer than us I’m sure. I’m sure animals been eating it in the wild for millions of years.

  • Boski Kabzinski

    my dog knows when i have some, she will immediately walk up to me and smell the pocket i have it in and follow me till i start breaking it down. While im picking out the stems she begs and whines when i dont feed them to her. i believe my dog thinks she really is just one of the group cause she’s always been treated as such so its funny to introduce my stoner dog to friends that havent met her yet. The best example of it was when my ex and i had a session and left my dog outside, afterwards she came in sniffed the air and knocked over the bong then proceeded to lick up the water. Jealousy? perhaps

  • Katie Gummery

    i was under the impression that second hand smoke from a spliff or such alike it didnt then contain anything that could get any one high so i asume its the same for a dog or cat? xx

  • Wizsteve Wiz

    one of the best treatments for tapeworms in cats are fresh leaves not dried .while it doesn’t get them high it will remove those nasty parasites.

  • Dee

    My little Chihuahua, loves to get the steams from me to chew on & my cat will go out of her way to get to me when I smoke.

  • ladybutterfly

    Got an interesting question. Could giving my dog MJ, help her with her leg cramps? She gets them quite often & nothing seems to help.

  • kimanne

    My animals LOVE IT!!!….I don’t force it….my cat comes and sits next to us and waits….our dog would rather eat it….both are healthy, well-fed and loved!!!

  • ShadeysLadyDrea

    We had an outdoor rabbit that we brought indoors to treat becuz it had maggots. The maggots were causing the rabbit lots of pain and seizures and to be very uncomfortable. One day, he was looking at me with a sad “help me, it hurts” look on his face, so i blew a few hits in his direction. Shortly after doing so, he was able to stretch out and rest, and did not have hardly any seizures. When awake, he seemed much more calm. After a few days of trying to cure him and smoking with him, he was almost healed, so we put him back outside for a few days, until we noticed the maggots were back. So he came back in and we resumed curing and smoking, but the maggots had taken over, so i blew him a last hit while he seized in my hands. A minute later, he relaxed and let the lord take him. But to think on it now, he always ran between our feet when we were smoking outside….(when he was in good health). RIP Bear Rabbit

    PS: Its not animal abuse to blow smoke toward your pet unless they are unable to move. If they don’t want it, they’ll walk away from it.