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Chicago Narcs Busted Lying Through Their Teeth In Marijuana Case

cops law enforcement special needs students entrapmentBy Clarence Walker

It was just another marijuana bust by Chicago’s crack dope squad and should have resulted in an easy conviction, but thanks to a forgotten camera, things didn’t exactly work out the way the cops planned. Now, the pot dealer is free, he has a bunch of cash in pocket, and it’s the cops who are facing justice.

It went down on June 6, 2013, when three Chicago Police narcotics officer and a pair of suburban Glenview police officers pulled over Joseph Sperling on the pretext that he had failed to properly use his turn signal, then claimed Sperling told them there were drugs in his vehicle. The cops said they found marijuana in plain view and arrested Sperling on marijuana possession and distribution charges. Business as usual, so far.

But when it came time to go to court the following March, things went south for the cops. Prosecutors had been questioning Chicago PD narcotics officer William Pruente, who said in sworn testimony that when police pulled over Sperling they immediately smelled marijuana and ordered him to exit the vehicle and stand at the rear of the car.

Then, defense attorney Steven Goldman asked the veteran narc if Sperling was handcuffed after he got out of the car.

“No, he was not handcuffed,” Pruente replied. “He was not under arrest at that time.”

Chicago narcotic officers Sergeant James Padar and Vince Morgan and Glenview Police officers James Horn and Sergeant Theresa Urbanowski backed up Pruente’s story.

Then, as Urbanowski was testifying, defense attorney Goldman dropped a bombshell. He interrupted the testimony to inform Judge Catherine Haberkorn that he needed to offer a videotape into evidence.

In a moment of courtroom drama like something out of “Law and Order,” Goldman revealed that the video came from Urbanowski’s police cruiser and that it flatly contradicted the sworn testimony of the police officers. The police had been lying to the court and to the judge and the video would prove it, Goldman said.

As Goldman patiently took Urbanowski back over the events she’d testified about, he played the recording and asked her to describe the difference between her original testimony and what was happening on the tape.

The footage contradicted the testimony of the police officers. Pruente had testified that Sperling had not been arrested or handcuffed until the cops had found the dope in plain view, but the video showed Pruente walking up to Sperling’s car, reaching in the open window, unlocking the door, pulling Sperling out, handcuffing him, and placing him in the back seat of a patrol car. Only then did the officers move to search the car.

The video clearly showed the officers spending minutes thoroughly searching Sperling’s car before finding weed and a small amount of psychedelic mushrooms in a black duffel bag.

As defense attorney Goldman noted during questioning, if the drugs had really been in plain view on the front seat of the vehicle, the officers had no need or reason to search it because they already had the drugs.

The brazen distance between the officers’ testimony and what the video revealed infuriated Judge Haberkorn, who immediately granted Goldman’s motion to suppress the evidence because the video showed police had neither probable cause to arrest Sperling nor a warrant to search his vehicle.

“This is very outrageous conduct,” Haberkorn said from the bench. “All the officers lied on the stand today. All their testimony is a lie. There is strong evidence it was a conspiracy to lie in this case, for everyone to come up with the same lie.”

Haberkorn then dismissed the criminal charges against Sperling.

“If this could happen to me, it could happen to anyone,” said Sperling, then 23, during a press conference with reporters after the release of his videotaped arrest. “I just happen to be one of the lucky few that had a video that proved the officers were wrong.”

The Cook County criminal justice system may have been done with Sperling, but he wasn’t done with it. Shortly after the charges were dismissed, he filed a federal civil rights lawsuit alleging illegal search and seizure against the Chicago and Glenview police departments. And he won. The two cities involved settled the suit, paying Sperling $195,000 for his troubles.

Others who have been similarly victimized could do the same. Under the US Code Section 1983, citizens are allowed to sue police in federal court as a result of an illegal search and arrest if the officer acted with malice “under color of law.”

In Sperling’s case, attorney John Loevy argued in the lawsuit that there was insufficient legal justification for officers to stop and arrest Sperling and search his vehicle, which was done without probable cause. Those illegal actions violated Sperling’s civil rights under the Fourth, Fifth, and Fourteenth amendments, as prescribed under Section 18 US Code 242. The argument was strong enough to force the cities to settle.

Former Houston Police homicide and narcotic gang investigator Rick Moreno told Drug War Chronicle the officers lied to protect an informant when they could simply have gone by the book and done their bust right.

“Once those officers had all the information about this guy having dope in his car they needed a warrant,” Moreno explained.

But the narcs plotted a scheme disguised as a routine traffic stop to avoid having to obtain one.

“What they’ve done in this case was a ‘wall off’ technique.” Moreno said, referring to a strategy most narcotic officers use to put a wall between the officer and the information provided by a snitch. And if everything goes as planned, the officer gets the dope without a warrant, they got the dope dealer and the snitch is protected.”

“The biggest casualty in the war on drugs is the truth,” said Chicago civil attorney Jon Loevy, who represented Sperling in his civil rights lawsuit.

“The ends justify the means,” said criminal defense attorney Goldman, explaining the attitudes that drove the cops to lie on the stand. “So because they get the bad guy off the street or the drugs out of their hands, everybody’s happy.”

Well, not everybody, not when the lies are so blatant they cannot be ignored. The Cook County criminal justice system wasn’t done with the cops caught lying on the witness stand. Sgt. Urbanowski’s camera had caught them red-handed, and four of them were indicted by a Cook County grand jury on perjury, obstruction of justice, and official misconduct charges in June 2015. They all face up to five years in prison on each count. The three Chicago police officers were immediately suspended, and the Glenview police officer was later fired. Their trials got underway this week.

“The foundation of our criminal justice system rests on the concept of truthful testimony,” said Cook County States’ Attorney Anita Alvarez in a press statement announcing the indictments. “We expect it from our witnesses and we demand it from our police officers.”

The criminal charges filed against the officers made headlines across the state and constituted another black mark against the much criticized Chicago Police Department. But the buzz around the courthouse was not just over the charges, but whether they would lead to the dismissal of other drug cases in which the charged cops were involved.

Calls to the Cook County prosecutor’s office regarding whether the four indicted officers would be investigated for perjury or illegal tactics in previous drug cases have not been returned.

While Sperling won $195,000 in damages from his illegal search and seizure lawsuit, legal experts say such victories are rare. Defendants usually don’t pursue such suits due to lack of funds, and if a case involving a bad search is dismissed, most defendants are just relieved the case is over and they no longer face charges, said Penn State University law professor David Rudovsky, a leading civil rights and criminal defense attorney and author of The Law of Arrest, Search, and Seizure.

Rudovsky told Drug War Chronicle there is also another reason such lawsuits are rare.

“Why would a jury award money for damages to a criminal already proven to have committed a crime?” he asked rhetorically.

Police perjury is nothing new — the practice has even generated its own nickname, “testilying” — but the Sperling case has renewed debate over why law enforcers resort to breaking the law.

“Police perjury in court to justify illegal dope searches is commonplace,” wrote former San Francisco police commissioner Peter Keane in a much-cited article on the topic.

“I’ve heard some police officers say in a social setting, ‘If [the defendant] is going to lie to beat the case, why can’t I lie too?” Cook County Public Defender, and former prosecutor Abishi Cunningham Jr. related.

“When police lie to make a case on someone they are saying the criminal justice system doesn’t work… so I’m going to do it my way,” Houston civil and criminal attorney Annie Briscoe told the Chronicle.

Briscoe recalled a drug case involving police illegal search where police recovered a sizeable amount of drugs from a client of hers. Houston police claimed he resembled a fugitive they were looking for. With her client facing up to life in prison, Briscoe convinced the trial judge to throw out the charge because of illegal search and seizure through the simple expedient of showing the judge a photo of the fugitive, who looked nothing like her client.

While the judge called Briscoe’s client “one lucky guy,” Briscoe had a slightly different take.

“The law should be enforceable by way of truth,” she said.

Police are also incentivized by the war on drugs to cut corners so they can reap monetary rewards, whether through asset forfeiture or by earning federal anti-drug grants through aggressive enforcement actions. And each bust makes their numbers look better.

As NYPD Officer Adil Polanco once revealed through a surfeit of honesty, “Our primary job is not to assist anybody, our primary job is to get those numbers and come back with them. You have to write somebody, arrest somebody, even if the crime is not committed, the number is there.”

Yes, there are numerous reasons cops lie. But none of them justify the lying, or the corrosive effect such behavior has on public trust and respect for law enforcement. These Chicago police officers are about to find out just how seriously the system takes such dishonesty, especially when it is so blatant the system can’t pretend it doesn’t see it.

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  • Snow Day Singed

    Justice is neat

  • Sinclair

    It’s a great day when police corruption is brought to justice. Hopefully they get some prison time. And not just a hand slap. This is a good example why prohibition does not work and creates massive amounts of corruption in the very entity’s that are supposed to protect us.

  • saynotohypocrisy

    Thank goodness for video cameras. But if I tried I could get very depressed about all the innocent people who didn’t have video evidence, or DNA evidence or any other evidence to exonerate them, and were framed, and rotted in American prisons (or got executed-murdered by the state), and continue to do so.

  • PeedNUrGenePool

    Did they let them go yet?

  • SilentPatriot

    So cops think it’s ok to lie because criminals do? Turnabout is fair play then – how about we get to completely ruin cops’ lives for eating donuts?

    • Nate

      Sounds like a 2nd amendment thing to me

  • Closet Warrior

    Hey Hey Hey, Snitches Get Stitches Biitchs!!! That’s why the dirty bastards got fired instead of jail time. They have it rough in there where they’re put people away and are still inside just waiting on a chance like this to come true. In my state, cops park diagonally in front of you whether you’re a flight risk or not with your vehicle. The reason they do this is so they can handcuff, beat, search and plant evidence on you and their car cameras only pick up front and rear footage so it creates bliid spots. They have perfected their art of civilian espionage!!!