Jul 092015
 July 9, 2015

first church of cannabis indianaIndiana became one of the most controversial states in America when it recently passed a bill allowing discrimination on religious grounds against the LGBT community. That discriminatory law in Indiana may have opened a can of worms that the creators of the new law didn’t envision. Bill Levin created the ‘first Church of Cannabis’ based off of that same law, claiming that the new law protects his church and it’s goers from prosecution in Indiana for marijuana because marijuana is part of their deeply held religious belief. At first church members were going to actually toke up at church services, but after threats from the police, church organizers decided to hold services that didn’t include consumption of marijuana.

Church organizers said that they would rather challenge Indiana’s new law in civil court, not criminal court. I know that bummed a lot of people out, but in the grand scheme of things, I think it was the right decision. It would be much harder to win the hearts and minds of Indiana’s public after there were arrests compared to a civil legal challenge. That civil legal challenge came yesterday when church organizers announced that they have filed a lawsuit in an attempt to try to end marijuana prohibition in Indiana, at least for religious purposes. Per the Indy Star:

By filing its highly anticipated religious liberty claim Wednesday, the First Church of Cannabis has put the question everyone’s been wondering about in the hands of the court:

Is this a real religion?

And does it have a protected right to practice legitimate beliefs?

Some legal experts remain skeptical that the cannabis church’s challenge of Indiana’s marijuana laws will survive for long in front of a judge. But the case focuses on — if a bit unusually — some of the weighty complexities of religious liberty claims and raises lingering questions over how Indiana’s new Religious Freedom Restoration Act can and can’t be used.

I just hope this lawsuit gets a fair shake. Because it involves marijuana, there will be outrage. However, this case should be decided based off of legal reasoning, not emotion. Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act is very broad, and allows many, many things if it’s in the name of religion, even outright discrimination. Marijuana consumption in Indiana, religious or otherwise, doesn’t harm anyone. People are saying that Indiana has to draw a line in the sand, and that the law isn’t as far reaching as the organizers of the Church of Cannabis claim. However, if there’s going to be a line drawn in the sand, I don’t see how that line doesn’t allow cannabis consumption,which hurts no one, but allows almost limitless discrimination, which obviously harms many. I will definitely be keeping a close eye on this case.

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  14 Responses to “Church Of Cannabis Lawsuit Seeks To Overturn Marijuana Prohibition On Religious Grounds”

  1.  

    The Catholic church uses wine in their ceremonies of Communion and no one blinks. But use cannabis as a sacrament and people will turn up with signs protesting at your church door.

  2.  

    Looks like a clear-cut case:

    Jesus specifically told his disciples to “anoint” people. That anointing took place using a specific formula made from a recipe found in the Old Testament book of Exodus.

    That recipe (Exodus 30:23) includes about 6 pounds of “kaneh-bosen”.

    According to many biblical scholars, “kaneh-bosen” was/is Marijuana.

    Most of the diseases mentioned as being healed miraculously after anointing are, curiously, the same ones that cannabis can heal today. Things like epilepsy, leprosy, and “crooked limbs” (an obvious reference to multiple sclerosis).

    Exodus 30:

    23 Moreover, the Lord spake unto Moses, saying, Take thou also unto thee principal spices, of pure myrrh five hundred shekels, and of sweet cinnamon half so much, even 250 shekels, and of qaneh-bosm [cannabis] 250 shekels, 24 And of cassia 500 shekels, after the shekel of the sanctuary, and of oil olive an hin: 25 And thou shalt make it an oil of holy anointment, an ointment compound after the art of the apothecary: it shall be an holy anointing oil. 26 And thous shalt anoint the tabernacle of the congregation therewith, and the ark of the testimony, 27 And the table and all his vessels, and the candlestick and his vessels, and the altar of incense, 28 And the altar of burnt offerings with all his vessels, and the laver and his foot. 29 And thou shalt sanctify them, that they may be most holy: whatsoever toucheth them shall be holy.

    •  

      Modern era Christian fundamentalists, for the most part, twist the meaning of God’s word. They don’t have much to say about tobacco and alcohol abuse, do they? But they are so convinced that marijuana users are doing the Devil’s work. SMH.

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        Even though most of them are down on weed, they don’t have much to say about it, they don’t have any interest in getting into a debate about it, because they know they’d lose. Worth noting is that younger evangelicals are not immune from the more tolerant views of their generation.
        Keep telling the cannabis haters, over and over and over again, that alcohol is FAR more dangerous. Same for tobacco and prescription opiates. And taunting them if they stonewall you and refuse to discuss it or say something ridiculous. Cannabis prohibition can’t stand the light of day, it’s like a criminal who does his dirty work in the darkness.

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      I remember seeing perhaps the most succinct and relevant comment in a recent YouTube video: “God is perfect. Man is not. Man made liquor. God made pot.”

  3.  

    I can’t help but feel, and to say with
    certainty, that smoking marijuana brings me closer to God. That when
    presented clearly and with clarity of how marijuana helps me turn off my
    mind, expand my feelings and emotions, to ask the question behind the
    question behind the question in search for God’s truth for myself. I
    think a good man could bring this understanding of awareness to the
    masses of people and allow smoking marijuana as a religious freedom. We
    create with thought our feelings. What I’ve discovered is that smoking
    marijuana expands my focus. Our brain and mind is how we focus. This is
    the reason, and why we’re creators and even deliberate creators of our
    own destinies because we allow the mind to focus.

    This focusing
    creates a vibration. Humans are vibrational beings. The universe is a
    vibrational energy. Energy is something that can never be destroyed. So
    the way we understand this vibration is the way we understand what focus
    is. Focus is all about what we’re thinking, and speaking. So the way we
    understand how we focus, is on how we’re feeling. Our emotions
    determine how we’re feeling. So when I discovered that when I pay
    attention to the way I feel, I can control the way I feel by focusing my
    thoughts. I can then get into the same vibrational energy as with the
    source that’s within me. This source, is the source that’s within us
    all. We can have this source vibrational energy walk with us throughout
    our day.

    I think thoughts that are in alignment with what I feel
    source feels about me, or what source feels about anything, I feel that
    power of energy then going through me. Pretty amazing, so now I know
    with certainty I came from source energy. Every time I can, I then plug
    into this source energy. I can feel the power of this source. Like
    clarity more than confusion. Like happy more than sad. Like a feeling of
    love, more than a feeling of hate. I like feeling of appreciating, or
    optimism more than pessimism. Etc.

    Stay High and Keep Grinning!

    Michael

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