Sep 202012
 September 20, 2012

colorado amendment 64National Black And Latino Police Organizations Announce Support For Amendment 64

Former law enforcement officials will join campaign to announce the endorsements at a news conference on Thursday, Sep. 20, at 12 p.m. in front of the Denver City-County Building (1437 Bannock St.)

DENVER – A group of former police officers, judges and prosecutors who support Amendment 64, will join the Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol at a news conference on Thursday, Sep. 20, at 12 p.m. to release a letter of endorsement signed by law enforcers from across the state. They will also announce endorsements from two national police organizations: Blacks in Law Enforcement of America and the National Latino Officers Association.
WHAT:  News conference announcing law enforcement support for Amendment 64, the initiative to regulate marijuana like alcohol
WHEN:  Thursday, September 20, 12 p.m. MT
WHERE:  In front of the Denver City-County Building, 1437 Bannock St., Denver
WHO:   Lt. Tony Ryan (Ret.), 36-year veteran of the Denver Police Dept.
        Lauren Davis, former deputy district attorney in Denver and Manhattan
        Neill Franklin, executive director of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP)
        Betty Aldworth, advocacy director of the Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol
        Several other former cops, prosecutors, and judges who support Amendment 64
In the sign-on letter being released at the news conference, law enforcers outline the following reasons for supporting Amendment 64:
•  Redirect limited law enforcement resources toward preventing violent crimes
•  Cut off funding to violent gangs and drug cartels, which generate the majority of their revenue from illegal marijuana sales
•  Protect the lives of police officers who must enforce ineffective marijuana prohibition laws
•  Reduce access to marijuana by teens by taking marijuana out of the underground market, putting it behind the counter, and instituting strict age-limits
•  Restore mutual respect and good relations between law enforcement and communities bearing the brunt of the current marijuana laws
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About Johnny Green

Johnny Green is a marijuana activist from Oregon. He has a Bachelor's Degree in Public Policy. Follow Johnny Green on Facebook and Twitter. Also, feel free to email any concerns.
  • http://twitter.com/PuffAwayOils Puff Away Oils

    Is that true about the violent gangs and drug cartels generating a majority of revenue with mj sales? I always thought hard drugs were the status quo for them, but I don’t really know for sure. If anyone has more info on that, I’d be interested in hearing about it. But I think that’s a great initiative either way.

    • dinges65

      But never forget: Criminals do not get rich because of your purchase from them, but because of prohibition. You are NOT responsible.

      I always get very angry when prohibitionists accuse me and other users of funding drug cartels and criminals, while it is themselves who are causing the flow of money to criminals with their prohibitionist policies. They may be able to force me to buy from questionable sources, but they will not be able to make me adapt my life style to their evil wishes.

  • roger

    Some of the figures I have heard estimate the cartels make about 60-75% of the money from the sell of MJ. Legalizing MJ would take it out of their hands and put into tax paying businesses. I don’t believe this will boost the economy much. The overall benefit is by cutting the cartel’s fund by more than half. If you told a legal business like Ford they could no longer sell 70% of their cars or trucks, it would take years for them to recover if ever.

    • http://twitter.com/PuffAwayOils Puff Away Oils

      Appreciate the response! I definitely was not aware of that stat, but it’s yet another good reason to make some changes.