Aug 202014
 August 20, 2014

seattle washington marijuana cannabis cup high timesLegal cannabis sales started in Washington on July 7th. The first legal purchase in Seattle was made by 65 year old grandmother Deb Greene at Cannabis City. Rather than consume some of the cannabis she purchased, Deb Green instead donated some of the cannabis to Seattle’s Museum of History and Industry. Per Time:

She purchased two bags of legal weed, one for personal use and another that was signed by Cannabis City owner, James Lathrop, so it could be “saved forever,” Greene told the Seattle Times. “You don’t use history.”

It’s pretty heartening that the Seattle museum will display cannabis, yet another demonstration that cannabis is moving out of the shadows and into the mainstream. The first legal purchase in Colorado was by a military veteran named Sean Azzariti. It is tremendous that the first purchase in Colorado was a military vet and that the first purchase in Seattle was a grandmother, not your stereotypical “stoners”. As far as we know, Azzariti consumed his cannabis, that he uses to combat post-traumatic stress and none of it made it to a museum, making Ms. Greene’s cannabis at Seattle’s Museum of History and Industry all that much special. It would be fun to be a fly on the wall at the museum to see what people have to say about the cannabis display. A time-lapse audio recording would be amazing, as the novelty wears off and decades from now, future generations are amazed that marijuana prohibition was a policy in the first place.

These are truly historic times. Future generations will certainly look back and wonder what the big fuss was about, just as we are amazed that alcohol prohibition was even implemented in the first place and that racial segregation was the law of the land. Historians will look back on prohibition and wonder why such a harmless plant led to so many harmful public policies prohibiting it. Let’s keep up the fight, keep spreading the word and put cannabis prohibition into the dust bin of history, so it will be a relic of the past, partly commemorated by a few cannabis flowers in a museum donated by a loving grandmother.

Source: International Cannabis Business Conference

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About Anthony Johnson

Anthony Johnson is the director of New Approach Oregon, the PAC responsible for Measure 91, that ended cannabis prohibition for all Oregon adults in 2014. In addition to helping organize the International Cannabis Business Conference & the Oregon Medical Marijuana Business Conference, he also serves as a Board Member of the National Cannabis Coalition, working to legalize cannabis across the country and Show-Me Cannabis Regulation, an organization specifically working to end cannabis prohibition in Missouri.As President of the University of Missouri Law School ACLU Chapter, Anthony co-authored the measures that legalized medical cannabis possession and decriminalized personal possession for all adults within the city limits of Columbia, Missouri, in 2004. Following law school, Anthony practiced criminal defense for two years before working full time in the political field to help improve and protect civil liberties.You can follow Anthony on Twitter and also friend him on Facebook by following the links below as he posts mostly about civil liberties and politics with dashes of sports, music, movies and whatnot.
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  One Response to “First Legal Marijuana Purchased In Seattle Donated To Museum”

  1.  

    Grandma Bud :)

    Interesting Facts on the Public Information Channel:
    “Anna Mary Robertson Moses (September 7, 1860 – December 13, 1961), better known by her nickname of ‘Grandma Moses,’ was a renowned American folk artist. She is often cited as an example of an individual successfully beginning a career in the arts at an advanced age.” Wikipedia

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