ohio marijuana medical marijuana legalization
Ending Marijuana Prohibition

If Ohio Issue 3 Passes, It Would Be A Very Unique Form Of Marijuana Legalization

ohio marijuana medical marijuana legalizationIn just two days from now, Ohio voters will cast their votes for or against various measures. The two that the marijuana community around the country will be watching closely will be Issue 2 and Issue 3. Issue 3 would legalize marijuana possession, consumption, and cultivation in Ohio. Homes with adults over 21 would be able to grow up to four plants for personal use, and for-profit cultivation would have to occur on ten designated properties. Issue 2, if passed, would nullify some or all of Issue 3 if both measures passed. We will have to wait for a lengthy legal battle to ensue and wrap up before we find out how the dust would settle if/when both measures pass.

The Ohio legalization initiative, if passed, would create a lot of firsts in marijuana reform, as outlined by the great Ethan Nadelmann, Executive Director of the Drug Policy Alliance, in a recent article on CNN:

Issue 3 is a first in many respects: the first marijuana reform campaign funded almost entirely by “investors” who would benefit financially from the initiative, the first initiative to restrict commercial production to a limited number of sites owned by the major investors in the ballot initiative, and the first to appear simultaneously on the ballot with another initiative — Issue 2 — that seeks to nullify the legalization initiative. If Issue 3 wins, it would make Ohio the first state to legalize marijuana without first legalizing it only for medical purposes.

Ethan Nadelmann expressed in the article that he is not publicly opposing or endorsing Issue 3. There was a lot of opposition to the measure among national reform leaders, and still is, but more and more national reformers have come out recently in support of the initiative for one reason or another. I have always felt that guidance and opinions from non-Ohio residents is great for facilitating conversation, but at the end of the day, this is an election decision that will be made by Ohio voters, so opinions of those outside of Ohio should be taken with a grain of salt.

Polling for the initiative has been all over the place, with some polling showing a clear victory for Issue 3, while others showing it too close to call. Like I’ve told people via Twitter and Facebook, you can’t vote ‘undecided’ on Election Day, and the initiative obviously will need over 50% to win, so polls are not as useful right now as some are making them out to be because some of them show such a low level of support, and high levels of ‘undecided’ voters. All will be known in 2 days, or close to two days if the results are tight and an official determination lingers. One thing is for sure – all eyes are on Ohio this week.

Regardless of how the initiative turns out, I hope that a lot of the tension that has been present in Ohio subsides, and people are able to put their differences aside. I have heard about a lot of friendships that have been tarnished during this campaign, and a lot of hateful/hurtful things have been said, and that makes me sad. When the reform community has a lot of infighting, the only people that win are prohibitionists. That’s not to say that people need to blindly follow what other say, because this is a free country. However, it’s possible to oppose or support something without trying to rip the other side to shreds. I saw similar things happened in Washington in 2012, and a lot of those tensions still exist.

  • saynotohypocrisy

    I’m not from Ohio, but there’s people in Ohio who need medicinal marijuana now. And Issue 3 will provide it for them, on a NON-PROFIT basis, that’s part of issue 3. Pass Issue 3, vote no on the politician power grab that is Issue 2, and then start organizing a coalition to end the oligopoly provisions of issue 3. Who cares if RO has a monopoly for a couple of years, they’ll deserve that for liberating so many people to get their medicine at a fair price, and to grow their own for whatever reason they choose. Michigan and Missouri have powerful reform groups looking to legalize weed, Ohio has no powerful reform groups except RO. It’s a messy way to do things, but everyone will benefit except illegal commercial growers. This isn’t fair to them, they should be able to compete on a level playing field, but they are getting shut out for now in most state legalization initiatives, not just Ohio, and that’s not enough to outweigh all the good this will do, not even close.

    • familyguy

      black market weed creates and suppots criminal empires 100 percent. buy legal cannabis yes on 3, no on 2.

      • saynotohypocrisy

        Sometimes black market weed is just your friend or neighbor growing and selling to you, which is a bogus crime, and no empires of any kind are involved. Buying from them is supporting the grass roots economy, and as long as who can legally grow commercially is excessively restricted, and prices excessively high, some people will prefer to deal with friends + neighbors, and that’s fine with me. Too many way bigger problems to worry about.
        When cannabis is treated as fully equal to alcohol (which is still way more than fair to alcohol), government will have the moral authority to insist that commercial growers comply with their at long last reasonable regulations.

    • Tim

      Totally agree. Those who will reject the half a
      Loaf that issue 3 provides with a view to improving on it are probably going to be scratching their heads in 5 years when there is still no reform if Issue 3 fails this year.

  • NoDecaf

    How do you reason with people that don’t care about the disabled, the wounded, those with debilitating disease and those trying to push through chemo? I’m in a wheelchair due to a diving accident and my sister lost her battle with cancer. Prohibitionists are posting a repetition of misinformation. They don’t care about facts because whatever they say, they feel the end justifies their means. How do you reason with these?

    • Acidsex

      If this proposal fails at the polls, will you blame RO or the voters? Because from those I have spoken with that are voting no do not have a problem with recreational and medical use but more in the manner that RO used in order to corner the market. Many of those people do not want the state constitution to be perverted for financial gain and protection of any sort of monopoly/oligopoly.

      Does that make them prohibitionist or do the only facts and reasons we care about only matter when they line up with our own beliefs?

      I suspect had RO approached this without a needy attitude and the intent to control 10 grow sites that the backlash would not have been as bad and more support would have been garnered. But I would be more interested in hearing just where the blame will be placed if and when Issue 2 passes and Issue 3 passes. I think we can all agree their marketing approach of “Buddie” has done way more harm than it has good and that could very well be a contributing factor at the polls.

      Hopefully Tuesday brings legalization even if it means in a corrupt greedy grab by RO but I think Ohioans should brace themselves to have blame placed upon them if this fails because how do you reason with people that don’t see how RO screwed up what should have been a sure thing?

      • NoDecaf

        If it gets voted down it’s because prohibitionists were in bed with people that freak over the word monopoly. (Even when it clearly isn’t) If 2 passes though, well, I don’t want to think about #2.

      • familyguy

        here we go again. the choice is simple buying legal, taxed , regulsted cannabis or continue to buy black mzrket, criminal empire weed. that is the bottom line.

      • Lawrence Goodwin

        You cynical Ohio voters should stop whining and instead be VERY grateful for this chance to legalize “10 grow sites” for cannabis plants. You are a small state both geographically (44,000 square miles) and in population (more than 11 million people). Compare yourselves to nearby New York, which annually wastes almost $700 million of its taxpayers’ hard-earned money on state and local repression of a legal cannabis industry. That’s for constant anti-cannabis police actions, over-zealous prosecution, the massive costs of housing “marihuana” offenders in county jails and state prisons, etc. New York’s pathetic medical cannabis program, which is just starting, allows only 5 “grow sites” and severely restricts public access to a mere 20 dispensaries scattered across 54,000 square miles. New York is home to more than 19 million people, roughly 50,000 of whom are diagnosed just with cancer–one of 10 conditions covered by the medical law–at any given time. You think that’s adequate for millions of people who are sick and suffering? New Yorkers will probably have to wait at least another decade to experience the repeal of cannabis prohibition that Ohio voters have full power to enact themselves with Issue 3/sound defeat of Issue 2. Do it, Ohio, PLEASE!

      • OhioBrian

        If this is what you believe, then vote Yes on Issue 3 to legalize and vote Yes on Issue 2 to ban the ten farm trust; even if people don’t like the farm idea, personal use/possession as well growing a small quantity will be decriminalized.

        My own views upon: even were the ban to just be blanket repealed, I’m betting ultimately fewer than ten companies would commercialize on an industrial scale in the state, as well this is far less than what’s much closer to monopolies with the 4 casinos Ohio voters recently legalized (those also a natural monopoly as only one casino per large city) as well if one considers what alcohol distributors are like (basically owned by the big brewers so if you’re a craft brew, you’ve gotta play ball with if you want to sell in stores), this isn’t anything we don’t face already with them or host of other industries. Further, with out of state, and the personal allowances, its not like the dispensaries will be able to sell for anything but likely market prices as there’ll be too much competition still. This isn’t unlike we only have several brands of gasoline, and yet in most areas of the country each region typically gets all from the same refinery or distribution point(though they may put in their own additives), and even then the price is roughly the same across a wide area.

        Once again though, if you don’t agree and don’t like the arrangement, vote YES to legalize with Issue 3 and then eliminate the farms’ ownership of commercial production by voting YES on Issue 2. What happens then it likely goes to the courts to decide (as Issue 2 contradicts part of Issue 3), but again, Issue 3 also allows for personal use and people to farm their own, so at the very least then marijuana will be both decriminalized and legalized for individuals even if voters decide they don’t want the farms.

        Plus, there’s always the possibility to change in the future; the key point though is to get it legal as Ohio a “bellwether” for the nation and having it here will finally send undeniable signal the disastrous War on Drugs and our society’s approaches to have to be drastically rethought. Just a reminder on the numbers; we’ve spent $1.5 Trillion, killed hundreds of thousands violently, destroyed millions of lives more with 1 out of 4 people imprisoned worldwide in the “Land of the Free” and yet drug usage as well violence rates ARE STILL THE HIGHEST IN THE US COMPARED TO ALL OTHER DEVELOPED COUNTRIES! -We smoke twice as much dope here as in Holland! And what’s more, the 44% who’ve admitted to using at least once (or that wouldn’t want our friends, family, fellow citizens in jail over) are thus complete hypocrites on the subject; people like us and the last 3 presidents are perhaps only fortunate we’ve not been busted on our BS….or perhaps many of us aren’t black for whom though their usage rates are almost exactly the same as whites, get arrested up to almost 6 times as much for the crime! So vote “NO”…but then realize you’re full of sh*t…don’t like parts of, fine, don’t cast a vote for or again vote YES on Issue 2 to block.

  • Franklin

    You get the feeling from most of the articles on Ohio that it’s going to fail. I’ve also seen friends want to strangle each-other of this. The fact is that Ohio is the first time in reform history that a Pro reform group actually joined forces with prohibitionists. If I’m wrong, please correct me so we can study that. In Ohio, it’s a fact that it has happened. People who want to legalize are actually supporting Issue 2, which blocks monopoly financing but also bans the ballot from reforming an S1 substance. I think if Ohio fails, the prohibition groups get a huge boost. By Christmas you have Ohio standing around scratching their heads wondering where the media attention went and what Issue 2 actually changed. They will be wondering about 2016 and why there is no marijuana reform issue on the ballot at all. I think this will be compounded by nearby Michigan and of course California moving in to regulate adults sales. We won’t hear from Ohio again on this issue for a long time. I hope i’m wrong.

    • Tim

      I agree. The law under Issue 3 is far from ideal. But those pro-reform folks who are emboldened that there is a ballot initiative at all voting against it so a better ballot issue in 2016 can be are extremely naive. It will be years before Ohio will have another opportunity, even for medical only. 2016 will be wrapped up with Presidential politics. Pass issue three so some infrastructure can start to be built, and improve the law. Even improving so care givers can grow for multiple patients would be a big step.

      • Franklin

        There is absolutely nothing to lose by voting Yes on 3. I’ve never seen a marijuana reform law that everyone agreed on. What we have done in other states is united when it came down to crunch time. If Ohio messes this up by voting for 2, then the ballot initiative is gone for marijuana in Ohio. The part about not being able to use the ballot for a Schedule 1 substance, won’t appear on the ballot summary. But it will become law if enough people are duped. They will be at the mercy of the legislature. That means starting with Charlotte’s Web, and eventually developing such a restricted medical model that it doesn’t really work for anyone. Minnesota for example. No on 2 if nothing else.

    • skoallio

      Die hard marijuana freaks are less than a fraction of a percent of the population. Them turning against a legalization initiative is the last thing you should worry about. Their numbers are so small which will have no impact on the outcome. Its the mainstream masses of people like parents with kids and those with jobs that matter.

      • JohnB

        I agree, and I have been saying this since February. While RO’s campaign certainly hopes for cannabis users’ votes, they are politically savvy enough that they couldn’t possibly have been counting on advocates alone to get it done.I still believe that is why it is structured as it is; it is meant to appeal to the typical Ohio voter who cares nothing about cannabis; they simply care about the economics of the issue.

      • shelly

        A lot of pot smokers are educated parents with jobs … Sorry .. I was raised in a family that sold pot and it cuts across all demographics but its been so criminalized forever people who smoke just don’t tell other people.. They just keep it hidden from judgmental people..

      • Franklin

        I think there is probably a better term for the chronically misguided. If 80% of Ohioans support medical marijuana and 54% said they approved of recreational, who the heck are you talking about? That was the last poll that I saw on Ohio. You are an East Coaster I’m guessing for the stoner reference to the Cheech and Chong stereotype non productive stoner. We don’t see that in the Bay Area. We didn’t see that in Silicon Valley in the 90s and we don’t see it today.

        California has the largest economy in America. The 8th largest in the world. Our ports are running at full capacity. That old standby propaganda just doesn’t stick on the West Coast. Wake up and smell the coffee. California consumes more cannabis per person than anywhere in America. You can’t suggest that we aren’t productive in a reasonable conversation. We also have one of the lowest obesity rates. We are an active group pretty well know for being the healthiest in the US. This isn’t news to most of the people with “jobs that matter”.

        Some people are just not productive and they might smoke the plant. With or without it they would still be the same person. Let’s try to move beyond the parts of the discussion that we have already covered. We aren’t going to keep backsliding into stereotypes and Reefer Madness. I’m not saying you are going that far, but we don’t need to either.

    • JohnB

      I hope you’re wrong, too. But, I don’t think you are; I think the details of issue 2 are simply lost on most folks, who will vote for it without realizing its pitfalls.

  • Stephen Beard

    It’s Ohio. It may be that the only possible way to have marijuana declared legal is to make it big-business friendly and to make it a semi-monopoly. Hard to say how issue 3 will fare, although I personally think it will squeak by.

    Issue 2 is a different matter. It’s purpose is ostensibly to counteract the semi-monopoly aspects of issue 3, but the language is tricky and it addresses future situations as well. Some knowledgable people believe passage of issue 2 may make referendum amendments to the Ohio Constitution either much more difficult or impossible. It is disturbing that issue 2 was referred by the Ohio General Assembly by a unanimous vote by the majority Republicans with support from only 1 Democrat.

    I worry that issue 2 is a subtle means of perpetuating outdated and discriminatory laws enshrined in the Constitution. I suspect it will be approved and that many people will later regret their vote.

    For what it’s worth, I’m voting yes on issue 3, no on issue 2.

    • George Wolfe

      I wrote an article here https://t.co/RkYs1LPNj3 describing why I agree. And, it’s unfair that the State maintains a liquor and gambling monopoly while opposing this measure.

    • saynotohypocrisy

      I suspect you’re right that a lot of people are going to regret their yes vote on 2, when they realize they’re handed power to the fat cat politicians and taken it away from the people.

  • I like what Ethan said about people from out of state, their “opinions should be taken with a grain of salt”… (there ya have it, Mimi Freedman.. from Texas & Colorado)

    • saynotohypocrisy

      Arguments rise or fall on their own merits, I don’t see that it really matters who makes them. Ohioans tend to know more about the background and what’s at stake than out of staters, but not always.

    • m d

      Hello again Victoria, not stalking you. hahaha chichichi… This is 6stringsblues. I was just reading this article because Ohio is in the news. I left a comment and was reading others and found your comment. We talked briefly during a live feed on YouTube last week. Pleasure meeting you and I appreciate your involvement. My juicer is a Kuvings btw. Love it! Good luck Ohio. Oregon west coast or Ohio? Hmmmm? Ohio would be cheaper……. Peace! BTW> email address is 6stringsblues@gmail.com

  • Amy Sturm

    I am from ohio this measure only benefits a monopoly run legalization, if it passes ohioans have no choice in what strains are grown for medical purposes this is for profit only scheme being in the medical profession ive already delt with big pharmaceutical companies ive seen what greed can to do they only care about $$$not patients this is bad. I am definitely pro medical marijuana so please no prohibition comments please.

    • BIll

      I would rather my weed money go to 10 rich investors (that pay tax) as opposed to a mexican drug cartel that murders innocent people by the hour.

      • Amy Sturm

        Unless you’re going to Mexico I doubt buying weed from your local grower support cartels,btw responsible ohio is a legalized cartel they had to take it to ohio supreme court to take the words cartel out of the ballot education is key people, we don’t need this kind of ignorance in the community.

        • Trisha

          Yes , you are correct education is key and from your comment it’s obvious you have not educated yourself regarding these issues. Cartel was added to the ballot verbage by the disgruntled pocket lining politicians who are angry they are left out of this one.

          • Amy Sturm

            I happen to be very educated on the issues and what each ballot has written,we all must remember politics is a matter of view AND OPINION, it is not necessary to reply with nasty comments .

      • Shawn Patrick

        Most of what you buy in Ohio is grown in Georgia and Kentucky. The drug cartel argument is unrealistic and silly.

    • saynotohypocrisy

      If this wins, it sets up non-profit dispensaries for medicinal marijuana. Are you aware of that aspect of Issue 3? I think it’s the best feature of the plan. I think the dispensaries will be responsive to consumer demand for different strains, and the ones not popular enough for the stores will become legal to grow at home, if this passes.

      • Amy Sturm

        Most of dispensary licenses are already promised to investors friends, its not like other states laws that have non profit collaboratives.

    • Diesel

      The weed I get while it’s illegal is DIRTWEED, full of pesticides, in brick form, overly dry and brown. Oh yeah, and I can get locked inside a rapecage for possessing it. Eff you, dude.

      • Shawn Patrick

        Unless you have more than 3 ounces and are for some reason puffing away as you walk down the street, you’re not going to jail for it in Ohio.

        • Diesel

          I realize it’s been decriminalized for a long time here, and “paraphernalia” since 2012 (I’ve been arrested for a weed pipe, back in the nineties). If only it were so simple. Anyone on probation/parole will go to jail for a positive urine analysis. The odor alone is “probable cause” for the uniformed militia to search and seize various other contraband that results in jail visits. Possessing living plants (under 100g) under lights results in forfeiting your house, any vehicle used to purchase ferts and nutes, or lights, and going to jail, because they’ll weigh the entire plant, including roots and soil-ball, if not hydro (I’m pretty sure growing in and of itself is a huge felony, regardless of amount). Growing hasn’t been decriminalized, but it does fall under possessing the stuff. Having weigh-scales and sandwich baggies results in going to jail for distribution, which also hasn’t been decriminalized. So yeah, under very specific circumstances, after jumping through hoops and enduring searches and violations of your rights, you might get away with a minor misdemeanor fine that will stay on your permanent record forever, labeling you as a criminal, less likely to be chosen for many jobs. You’re right.

  • Bugz

    Regardless of what you think about marijuana legalization in Issue 3 of Ohio or any business model around Issue 3, the career politician counter initiative in Issue 2 has far more reaching consequences on democracy in Ohio and any future Citizen Initiative in Ohio!

    Although Issue 2 is entitled as the anti-monopoly amendment, Issue 2 grants monopoly control of the Ohio Citizen Initiative process to career politicians, and does far more to prevent future initiatives than it does to prevent monopolies, which are already illegal under federal and state antitrust law.

    For over 100 years the Ohio Citizen Initiative process has been the only tool in the Ohio constitution for voters to enact law by a direct democracy, and thereby keep career politicians in check when they refuse to do so themselves. Putting the Citizen Initiative process in the control of career politicians will only make legalization more difficult in years to come, but will also end an era of direct democracy in Ohio!

    http://www.ohioconstitution.org/2015/10/28/ohioans-beware-state-issue-2/

    • Michael Jolson

      From Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow.
      Ordinarily I am a strong supporter of marijuana legalization given the insanity of putting (mostly poor and colored) people in cages, destroying families, and relegating millions to a permanent second-class status for using or selling a plant that is generally less harmful than alcohol or tobacco. And so it pains me to say that I cannot support the legalization initiative that will be on the ballot in Ohio tomorrow. In recent years I have become increasingly concerned by the way capitalist greed has overtaken the drug policy reform movement; it’s a sickening spectacle to see privileged white men rushing to get rich quick selling weed without any sense of irony that they will be making their fortune doing precisely what millions of impoverished people, especially black men, have been caged and shamed for doing for the past 40 years.
      One might think that legal weed might provide some economic opportunity for the families and communities that have been destroyed by the drug war. The revenue might be used for drug treatment on demand, or to help repair families and communities that have been destroyed, or to guarantee jobs for the millions who are unemployed due to criminal records. But instead, we’ve seen that capitalism — i.e., the mad rush for profit by people who have capital — is threatening to transform a movement for compassion and justice into another case study in how easily and quickly the wealthy and powerful adapt to new social norms and find a way to enrich themselves with complete disregard for basic notions of fair play and social justice. And so it is in Ohio.
      This ballot initiative grants an oligopoly (a form of monopoly benefitting a small group of people) to a group of

      • Would it be just as easy for a anti-monopoly group to fund a change to the constitution allowing the market to be open to all business in the near future? On the other hand, if I invested in making it legal for the majority which otherwise may have not been unified or funded enough to collect the signature, should I not demand a return on my investment before the market opens up? Does voting on Issue 2 legalize marijuana and create an open market? Or is this just the ultimate merging of capitalism and democracy?

      • Free ohio

        If the rich white guys start a monopoly on crack, then u can complain about the unfair jailing of blacks, but until then its all colors going to jail. The only color that don’t is green. Think I’m wrong then why did Ohio States black Qb just get out of jail quicker than a game sellout???? Money alumni Money!

    • Michael Jolson

      Sorry that quote wasn’t meant for your comment but the Pro 3 below. Interesting information!

  • Bugz

    Although Issue 2 is entitled the anti-monopoly amendment, it grants monopoly control of the Ohio Citizen Initiative process to career politicians, and does far more to prevent future initiatives than it does to prevent monopolies, which are already illegal under federal and state antitrust law.

    For over 100 years the Ohio Citizen Initiative process has been the only tool in the Ohio constitution for voters to enact law by a direct democracy, and thereby keep career politicians in check when they refuse to do so themselves. Putting the Citizen Initiative process in the control of career politicians will only make legalization more difficult in years to come, but will also end an era of direct democracy in Ohio!
    Vote No on Issue 2; and Yes on Issue 3 for legalization in ohio!

    http://www.ohioconstitution.org/2015/10/28/ohioans-beware-state-issue-2/

  • m d

    GOOD LUCK! from Illinois. If Ohio becomes the 5th state to legalize cannabis today, I will be shopping for a new home tomorrow. Oregon is too damn expensive. lol… Freedom!

    • Diesel

      I’m on my way to Colorado, largely due to its freedom of weed, but I voted for legalizing the weed here in Ohio today, to support the cause anyway. When will we hear the results??

      • Christina

        8pm edt

        • Diesel

          Thank you, although now we have to wait until 9pm. I’m listening to Cannabisradio right now, and have a couple poll-results-pages open as well. Lots of great points being spoken on this online radio show. This is the very first time I’ve ever voted, and I have a sneaking feeling it’s the same for many others. If this got ME out to vote, and others are in cahoots, there’s no way it can fail.

  • As a neighbor Hoosier right across the border, I wish the anti-prohibitionists good luck! It is sad an essential legalized monopoly will have control of the commercial production. But can’t Ohio voters change the law in the future, especially when the monopolistic aspects come to the forefront? Sadly, the back-assward state of Indiana will probably be the last state to legalize freedom, btw, which part of the Constitution allows the government to control consumption of a plant? (P.S. The war on drugs began as a United Nations program hence the end around the Constitution) In Indiana, I’m afraid Eli Lilly will lobby hard against the legalization movement.

    • Diesel

      Making NATURE illegal is always completely ignorant. Why not make rain or snow illegal? Or birds? Stupid. btw, I hate Indiana for their hatred of freedom.

      • Being a Constitutional Libertarian, I totally agree except Indiana’s hatred of freedom. That, sadly is our government not the people. Often times acting in the best interests of corporate donors and not the people which is a result of some of the lowest voter turnout in the nation.

  • Diesel

    9:02pm – Out of 2 of 11,812 precincts reporting (0.00017%), 70% so far are AGAINST legalizing it. (AGAINST ISSUE 3 882-70% FOR ISSUE 3 377-30%)

    • Diesel

      9:21pm – it’s not looking too good. Out of 25% reporting, 66% oppose freedom so far. So glad I’m leaving this state tomorrow morning.

      • lushes

        Take me with you! LOL

        • Diesel

          Voters have rejected a ballot measure that would have made Ohio the first state to make marijuana legal for both recreational and medical use. Another 18,000 arrests for Mother Nature next year, yay. Goodbye, Ohio. I feel so sorry for those of you (lushes) that will have to endure this prohibition. SMH.

          • Patrick Ronals

            Please don’t come here just because you like legal pot. There is SO much more to being a Coloradan than that. This type of thing gives us a bad name. Go to Washington instead.

          • Diesel

            Too late. Good thing it’s not up to you. I don’t even smoke weed (I am thinking about trying it there though). I like the idea of freedom.

          • Patrick Ronals

            Well, I suppose that’s one, extraordinarily unfortunate point, added to the anti-legalization teams score: legalizing marijuana will attract the bottom dwellers of society and make them feel “emboldened”. I support national legalization, but the fact that Denver’s extremely awesome population is being forced to assimilate newcomers who don’t fit into our philosophy and value system is something I never expected and can’t say I’m happy about. You’re right, you can come and we can’t stop you. Doesn’t change the fact that it hurts our state’s quality of life and image.

            http://www.westword.com/news/angry-denver-craigslist-post-beginners-guide-for-new-coloradans-6967214

          • Diesel

            I’m here. Should I call the WHAAAA!mperLamps for you?

          • Diesel

            Whaa. I advise everyone who voted for legalization follow suite.

          • Youareanidiot

            You are an idiot.

          • Diesel

            I feel sorry for your mother.