May 042013
 May 4, 2013

america marijuana reform state level cannabisBy Phillip Smith

In the wake of the marijuana legalization victories in Colorado and Washington last November, and buoyed by a series of national public opinion polls showing support for pot legalization going over the tipping point, marijuana reform legislation is being introduced at state houses across the land at levels never seen before.

While the mere fact that a bill has been introduced is no guarantee it’s going to pass, that such bills are being introduced in record numbers speaks to how far the marijuana reform movement has come. According to a legislative activity web page maintained by the Marijuana Policy Project, decriminalization bills have been introduced in 10 states and the dependency of the Northern Mariana Islands this year, while outright legalization bills have been introduced in 11 states and the dependency of Puerto Rico.

(This article does not review current medical marijuana legislation, which will be the subject of an additional report. In the meanwhile, our Medical Marijuana Update each week provides extensive info on legislation and other developments in the issue.)

Some of the legalization and decrim bills are dead already (see below), but others remain alive. While passage of a legalization bill this year remains a long shot, decriminalization bills in some states may fare better.

NORML founder, erstwhile executive director and current legal counsel Keith Stroup has been fighting for marijuana law reform for more than 40 years. It’s never looked better, he said.

“I wasn’t sure I’d live long enough to see this happening, even though the demographics are on our side,” he said. “A lot of these legislatures, though, are still playing around with medical marijuana, when the truth is voters are ready to go much further, probably for decriminalization and maybe for legalization. But after we won Colorado and Washington, you can see the increased confidence a number of legislators have demonstrated, and there’s only going to be more of that.”

Karen O’Keefe is director of state policies for MPP. She hasn’t been at it as long as Stroup, but she has a solid decade of reform efforts under her belt, and she, too, said things were definitely looking up.

“When I first started at MPP, I don’t think a single state had a tax and regulate bill, and now we have 11 states, and probably Ohio coming on board, too, with tax and regulate. People are realizing it’s a serious issue with majority support, and legislatures are starting to catch up,” said O’Keefe.

“We first saw majority support in the Gallup poll a couple of years ago, but there wasn’t nearly as much activity as this year,” she said. “Having two states approve marijuana legalization with solid majorities made it seem real. Colorado and Washington were initiative states, and the first medical marijuana states were initiative states, too. Once the people have led the way, legislators begin to realize it’s a popular issue that makes sense and they start to act on it.”

Here’s what’s going on in the state legislatures (excerpted with edits from the aforementioned MPP web page), with further discussion following:

Marijuana Legalization Bills

Alabama – House Bill 550, sponsored by Rep. Patricia Todd, would allow adults 21 and older to possess or grow limited amounts of marijuana. It would also allow a regulated and taxed marijuana industry, in addition to setting up a medical marijuana program. The bill was referred to the House Public Safety and Homeland Security Committee.

Hawaii – Speaker Joe Souki introduced House Bill 150 and House Bill 699, which would have allowed the taxed and regulated sale of marijuana to adults 21 and older. Both bills would also have allowed adults to cultivate marijuana in a locked, secure facility. On February 12, the House Judiciary Committee deferred action on HB 699, killing the bill for the year. Because of legislative deadlines, the other tax-and-regulate bill also will not be able to advance in 2013, which is the first year of Hawaii’s biennial legislative session.

Maine – Rep. Diane Russell’s LD 1229 would allow adults 21 and older to possess and cultivate limited amounts of marijuana. It would also set up a system to license and regulate growers, infused product makers, retail stores, and labs. LD 1229 would impose a $50 per ounce tax on marijuana at the wholesale level. It was referred to the Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety on March 26.

Maryland – House Bill 1453, sponsored by Del. Curt Anderson, would have provided for a taxed and regulated marijuana industry. It would have also allowed adults 21 years of age and older to possess and cultivate limited amounts of marijuana. HB 1453 was referred to the House Judiciary Committee, which heard testimony on the bill on March 19. The bill did not advance out of committee before the deadline to pass the House.

Massachusetts – Rep. Ellen Story has sponsored House Bill 1632, which would allow adults 21 and older to possess and cultivate marijuana. It would allow a regulated, taxed marijuana industry once it is legal under federal law. HB 1632 was referred to the Joint Committee on Judiciary.

Nevada – Assembly Bill 402, sponsored by Assemblyman Joe Hogan, would allow adults 21 and older to possess and cultivate limited amounts of marijuana. It would also create a taxed and regulated legal marijuana industry. AB 402 was referred to the Committee on Judiciary, but it did not advance before the deadline.

New Hampshire – Rep. Steve Vaillancourt proposed House Bill 492, which would tax and regulate marijuana for adults’ use. It would also allow adults 21 and older to cultivate up to six plants. The Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee retained HB 492, meaning it will study the issue this fall. In addition, Rep. Mark Warden introduced House Bill 337, which would have made marijuana legal without imposing regulations. HB 337 received 112 votes on March 13, including from 52 Republicans, but 239 representatives voted against the bill, so it is dead for the year.

New Mexico – Sen. Gerald Ortiz y Pino introduced Senate Joint Memorial 31, which would have directed the state’s Economic Development Department to study the budgetary implications of a legal marijuana industry. The legislative session ended without SJM 31 receiving a floor vote.

Oregon – The House Committee on Revenue introduced House Bill 3371, which would allow persons 21 and older to grow and possess marijuana. It would also set up a system of taxation and regulation for the commercial production and sale of marijuana, similar to alcohol. The bill was referred to the House Committee on Judiciary, which approved the bill on April 2. The bill is now pending in the House Committee on Revenue.

Pennsylvania  Senate Bill 528, sponsored by Sen. Daylin Leach, would regulate marijuana similarly to alcohol. It would allow adults 21 years of age or older to purchase, cultivate, and possess limited amounts of marijuana. On April 3, the bill was referred to the Senate Law and Justice Committee.

Puerto Rico – Sen. Miguel Pereira has introduced a bill, Senate Bill 517, which would make it legal for adults 21 and older to possess marijuana but would not provide for regulated distribution or cultivation.

Rhode Island – On February 6, Rep. Edith Ajello introduced House Bill 5274, the Marijuana Regulation, Control, and Taxation Act, which was referred to the House Judiciary Committee. The bill would tax and regulate marijuana sales for adults’ use and would allow adults to cultivate up to three mature marijuana plants. Sen. Donna Nesselbush sponsors the Senate companion bill, Senate Bill 334. The bills are pending in the House and Senate judiciary committees.

Vermont –  Rep. Susan Davis’ House Bill 499 would have allowed adults 21 and older to possess up to two ounces of marijuana and to grow up to three plants. It would have required the Department of Liquor Control to regulate marijuana wholesalers, retailers, and labs and impose a $50 per ounce tax at the wholesale level. The bill did not advance before the crossover deadline. In addition, Sen. Jeanette White’s Senate Bill 160 would create a Study Committee on the Regulation and Taxation of Marijuana, which would be a legislative committee that would study a process for licensing marijuana businesses along with a taxation and regulatory structure.

Decriminalization Bills (generally speaking, see the notes)

Hawaii –  Sen. Kalani English sponsored Senate Bill 472, which would punish possession of up to an ounce of marijuana with a civil fine, while Sen. Donovan De la Cruz sponsored Senate Bill 739, which would impose a civil fine of up to $100 for no more than an ounce of marijuana. The Senate unanimously approved SB 472 on March 5. Both bills are dead for the year, but they will carry over to the second year of the state’s two-year session.

Illinois – House Bill 2332 would have imposed a civil fine on possession of a tiny amount of marijuana — 0.1 gram. It did not advance before the deadline.

Indiana – Senate Bill 580, sponsored by Sen. Karen Tallian, would have made possession of less than two ounces of marijuana a class C infraction punishable by a fine only with no possibility of jail time. The bill, which was referred to the Senate Committee on Corrections and Criminal Law, would also have made other reforms to Indiana’s marijuana laws, including allowing hemp. The bill did not advance before the crossover deadline.

Maryland – Senate Bill 297, sponsored by Sen. Robert Zirkin, would have reduced the maximum penalty for possession up to 10 grams of marijuana to a $100 civil fine. The Senate approved the bill in a 30-16 vote on March 19, but it did not get a vote in the House Judiciary Committee before the legislature adjourned on April 8. Another bill sponsored by Sen. Zirkin – Senate Bill 394 – would have made the maximum fine for marijuana possession a $100 civil fine. That bill was withdrawn.

Michigan – House Bill 4623, sponsored by Rep. Jeff Irwin, would replace possible jail time and criminal penalties with civil fines of $25, $50, or $100, depending on the number of prior convictions the person has for marijuana possession. The bill was introduced on April 24 and was referred to the House Committee on Judiciary.

Missouri – Rep. Rory Ellinger has introduced House Bill 512, which would reduce the penalty for possession of less than 35 grams of marijuana from up to a year in prison to a fine of no more than $250 and a suspended sentence.

New Mexico – House Bill 465, sponsored by Rep. Emily Kane, would have reduced the penalty for first offense possession of up to an ounce of marijuana to a $50 civil fine. A second offense would have been a petty misdemeanor carrying a $100 fine. It would have also imposed fines for up to eight ounces of marijuana. The bill passed the House, but the session ended before the Senate could vote on it.

New Hampshire – Rep. Kyle Tasker proposed House Bill 621, which would impose a fine on simple possession of marijuana. On March 21, the House of Representatives amended the bill to apply only to a quarter of an ounce of marijuana and to impose a fine of up to $200. It then approved the bill in a 214-115 vote, sending it to the Senate. On April 16, the bill received a negative recommendation in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

New Jersey – Senate Bill 1977, sponsored by Sen. Nicholas Scutari, would impose a $50 fine on up to 50 grams of marijuana (nearly two ounces). Assembly Bill 1465, sponsored by Assemblyman Reed Gusciora, was introduced in 2012 and passed the Assembly. The bill would impose civil fines starting at $150 on possession of up to 15 grams of marijuana. Both bills are pending in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

New York – Senate Bill 3315 would eliminate the “public use” exception to the state’s decriminalization law, a reform supported by Gov. Andrew Cuomo. [Note: Although New York decriminalized in the 1970s, New York City police have continued to arrest tens of thousands of people each year under the "public use" exception.]

North Carolina – Rep. Rep. Kelly Alexander sponsors House Bill 637, which would downgrade the penalty for possession of a small amount of marijuana from a misdemeanor that does not carry jail time to a civil infraction.  [Note: This is a depenalization, not a decriminalization, bill.]

Northern Mariana Islands – House Bill 18-42, sponsored by Rep. Christopher Leon Guerrero, would impose a $50 fine on marijuana possession in the U.S. territory.

Texas – Rep. Harold Dutton, Jr. sponsors House Bill 184, which would make up to one ounce of marijuana a class C misdemeanor, punishable by a $500 fine. It was referred to the House Criminal Jurisprudence Committee, which approved an amended version of the bill on April 23. The bill would now only apply to persons under 21 for their first offense.

Vermont – Senate Bill 48, sponsored by Sen. Joe Benning, and House Bill 200, sponsored by Rep. Chris Pearson, would impose a civil fine on possession of up to an ounce of marijuana. Under H. 200, a person under 21 who is found in possession of up to an ounce of marijuana would have to undergo substance abuse screening and possible treatment. On April 16, the House of Representatives approved H. 200 in a 92-49 vote, sending the bill to the Senate. Gov. Peter Shumlin has been a strong proponent of replacing criminal penalties with a civil fine.

As the lists demonstrate, some bills have died already, but others still breathe, and some could even pass this year.

“We’re most involved in Vermont, and we’re very hopeful the decriminalization bill there will pass before the legislature adjourns,” said MPP’s O’Keefe. “The bill is in the Senate, and the governor is supportive. That’s probably the best chance for removing criminal penalties this year.”

Passing a legalization bill could take a little longer, she said.

“Tax and regulate could end up taking a couple of years,” said O’Keefe, “but the bills in Maine and Oregon are getting serious consideration, and Rhode Island legislators seem very reasonable. But we don’t think it’s likely to pass in Rhode Island this year, although we are hopeful in will in the next couple of years be one of the first states to pass it.”

That it should take a year or two or three to get marijuana legalization passed in any given state legislature is no surprise, O’Keefe said.

“We’ve had a lot of bills that got a vote one year, but legislators needed more time to think and be educated,” she pointed out. “In Illinois, the House twice voted down medical marijuana before passing it, and in New Hampshire tax and regulate has slowly been gaining more and more support. This isn’t something legislators are used to, and in most cases it takes them awhile to get used to it.”

For Stroup, using the initiative process in states that allow for it is the best bet, but he cautioned that the movement is going to have to be able to win victories at the statehouse, too.

“Any time we have the choice of going to the people, it’s always in our interest to do so,” he said. “We know increasingly from the public opinion surveys that if the people decide, we win. Elected officials remain more timid about this than the public — they’re really worried about getting reelected and less worried about reform legislation — but realistically, we have to be able to win in the states that don’t have initiatives.”

When it comes to passing bills, though, Stroup drew a parallel with the first burst of decriminalization efforts in the 1970s. Oregon and Maine went for decriminalization early in the decade, but the other handful of states that decriminalized in that era only came in at the end of the decade.

“When we won those first couple of states in the 1970s, we thought we were off and running, but the other states were all waiting to see what would happen, so we didn’t win anything for a couple of years,” he recalled. “I think we’re in the same phase now when it comes to legalization. I have no doubt we will eventually win full legalization everywhere, but for the next couple of years, people in Colorado and Washington are going to have to be especially careful that they are demonstrating responsible use.”

Cannabis culture celebrations like 4/20 have their place, said Stroup, but the rest of the time, it should be about responsible use.

“That’s not the tactic we need the rest of the year,” he said. “We want to demonstrate to the average person that nothing really changes when you legalize marijuana except you quit arresting responsible marijuana smokers and raise some revenue. What we don’t want is a bunch of out-of-control pot smokers driving crazy — that will scare neighboring states and cause a political backlash,” the veteran activist warned.

“A backlash because of bad behavior won’t stop us — the demographics are on our side — but whether it takes five years or 15 depends to some degree on how well we behave ourselves. We may see decriminalization pass somewhere, but I don’t think we’ll win legalization this year. I think before that passes in state legislatures, those lawmakers need to see that what Colorado and Washington did was a good thing.”

The process of turning legalization victories at the voting booth into actual taxed, regulated, and legal commerce in Colorado and Washington is a process in progress in both states right now. By next year, those two states should be living experiments in marijuana legalization. Doing it right there will make it easier to get it done elsewhere. If not this year, next year. Or 2016.

Article From StoptheDrugWar.org - Creative Commons Licensing - Donate

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About Johnny Green

Johnny Green is a marijuana activist from Oregon. He has a Bachelor's Degree in Public Policy. Follow Johnny Green on Facebook and Twitter. Also, feel free to email any concerns.
  • http://twitter.com/420MEDsmoker 420 Med Smoker

    Hope springs eternal! Our Country will be safer, stronger, richer and freer when Marijuana Prohibition ends and we regulate and tax Cannabis.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ccreamer22 Chris Creamer

    You need to add Ohio!

  • fester09

    Go Ohio’s House Joint Resolution 6 ! O H…. I O or may be better yet O High O!

  • karrie567

    Cancer is a deadly disease that needs to be stopped from taking innocent lives. A disease that pays no respect to AGE nor FINANCIAL STATUS should not be allowed to reign instead it should be fight and eradicated.

    After the introduction of chemotherapy and radiotherapy the war against this deadly disease started but the probability that this war can be won using the methods above is not hundred percent certain.

    I was once a prisoner of cancer who used the methods above to begin the fight for my freedom which i got for sometime until the cancer returned with great determination to take my life and i was also determined not to allow it to take my life so i decided to sort for other solutions.

    I met with my doctor who told me about cannabis oil and she also told me about a friend of her’s who treats patients with it, she gave me his Email address( contacthospital_eastern.george@yahoo.com )and asked me to contact him. I contacted him and met him in person, i told him about my situation and asked him what i needed to do.

    He advised me, told me the quantity of oil i needed and how to use it. I followed his instructions and now i have finally gained my freedom.

    • nobody

      Congrads, thats great news!!!!!

      Thanks for sharing.

  • Jasper

    Karrie your cancer returned BECAUSE of the chemo and radiation. That’s how they get you coming back for more. Parmacuetical companies KNOW thc kills cancer cells but there is no money in it. These greedy drug companies are responsible for 90% of all cancer deaths. cannabis will cost them an estimated 700 billion a year in profits. They pay off politicians to keep MJ illegal. they are our real enemy.

    • Gothchic

      i agree

  • nobody

    My son had thyroid cancer at 21. It was tough times. That was in 1995, we had no alternatives we seen but surgery and radiation. We still live in fear to say the least. We had another fear just this last winter, but all went ok. This time.

    If mmj could fix it then why are we still not allowed to test it or have access to it. Whats the deal? Why all this illegal crap when people are sick and needs anything and everything they can get that might help them. What are we, killers? I would hope not.

    I would rather help everybody. I want to help us all. I want to give us all everything thats available that might help. If we get sick I want every option available to us to be legal. Why it aint I cant see it. I cant understand how they can be so cruel. I dont see how they can let us die without having every available option if we are sick.

    If it comes to you or yours then you will also see. And I bet you on that day you will also agree.