Massachusetts Marijuana Legalization Campaign Collects 100K Signatures


massachusetts marijuana campaign 2016The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol announced Monday it has collected more than 100,000 signatures in support of a ballot initiative to end marijuana prohibition in Massachusetts. The signatures must be reviewed and certified by town and city clerks before being submitted to the secretary of the commonwealth by December 2.

64,750 valid signatures of registered state voters are required to qualify for the November 2016 ballot. After the secretary of the commonwealth’s office tallies and confirms the signatures, the petition will be transmitted to the Massachusetts Legislature. If the legislature does not adopt the measure, initiative backers must collect 10,792 additional signatures in June 2016 to place the initiative on the November 2016 ballot.

“Massachusetts voters want the opportunity to end the failed policy of marijuana prohibition in 2016,” said campaign manager Will Luzier. “This initiative will replace the underground marijuana market with a tightly regulated system of licensed businesses that pay taxes and create good jobs.

“It should not be a crime for adults to engage in the responsible consumption of a substance that is objectively less harmful than alcohol,” Luzier said. “Police have far more pressing things to worry about than issuing citations to every adult they find in possession of a small amount of marijuana.”

In summary, the proposed initiative would:

  • allow adults 21 and older to possess up to one ounce of marijuana and grow a limited number of marijuana plants in their homes, similar to home-brewing;
  • create a tightly regulated system of licensed marijuana retail outlets, cultivation facilities, product manufacturing facilities, and testing facilities, which will be overseen by a commission similar to the Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission (ABCC);
  • provide local governments with the authority to regulate and limit the number of marijuana establishments in their city or town; and
  • create a 3.75% state excise tax on retail marijuana sales (in addition to the standard state sales tax) and allow local governments to establish an additional local sales tax of up to 2%. [Medical marijuana will NOT be subject to these additional taxes.]

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The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol is supporting a 2016 statewide ballot initiative to end marijuana prohibition in Massachusetts. For more information, visit


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  • Closet Warrior

    Mass you some slick mofo’s using failed alcohol prohibition and their own faults and language against the government. Good on ya Massachusetts, I hope you guys fuck the original fuckers-SamScam-our very governments are making money on things they don’t approve of but they keep holding out their hand don’t they?

  • Lee

    Massa is liberal as they come. I think this has pretty good shot of passing

  • Regulating and taxing cannabis will require a LOT of enforcers. I think Americans are getting tired of their enforcers.

    Cannabis should be treated like tomatoes.

  • If we don’t treat cannabis like tomatoes the hemp industry will be stillborn.

  • David Yoseph Schreiber

    Take precautions against electoral fraud. Observers should be placed at all polling stations and the results should be retabulated with discrepancies, if any, investigated. Disqualified signatures on the petition should be sampled and analyzed to establish if in fact the disqualifications were valid and to deter any other mischief.

    • Tom Denman

      I don’t really think there is a high likelihood that in Massachusetts there will be any concerns at the polling places. We’ve already had decrim, and then medical M on the books for years now. And there is a HUGE shift in resources towards the opiate issue. And beyond that, Mass has what I feel safe in saying, the cleanest elections in the country. Whether or not the politicians being elected are any kind of moral giants is as always, another story.

      The state also badly needs the revenues, and the governor’s office isn’t ignorant of the fact that Boston and Cambridge host more colleges and upwardly mobile millennials per square mile than nearly any urban region in the country. And if I know the MassCan folks, they will have a better GOTV program and Polling place presence than has been seen so far. Also, there’s basically no opposition group of any significance. They all pretty much are gone.
      Frankly, my biggest fear is after the election, once the successful ballot question results have charged the state congress with enactment of an actual legal framework. The real concern here in Mass should be that the legislature will create regs that favor these out of state outfits that want to squeeze out the small entrepreneurs, which I personally feel would be an awful outcome.. You’d be
      David I would like to extend an invitation come up and attend our annual Freedom Fest on the Boston Common next September. It’s the best “come one, coma all” events in the entire country, and I think you’ll b very pleased with the level of organization.
      Tom Denman
      Gloucester, Ma

      • David Yoseph Schreiber

        Thank you for the invitation. Unfortunately I’m forced to decline due to the large distance between Israel, where I live, and Massachusetts. I wish you success in your fest and hope that it will speed the day that the cannabis prohibition is ended in Israel as well.

        Prohibitionists should not be assumed to be honest, especially if one considers the actions of Husted against ResponsibleOhio, the general behavior of the DEA, characters like Christie, and even the rhetoric of Boston Mayor Walsh. I do not believe that the percentage of valid signatures submitted in Ohio was only 42 percent. I would maintain that election observers and sampling rejected signatures should be done routinely even in the best of circumstances in order to reduce the ordinary shenanigans.

        I liked your comment better mine because it was in the spirit of peace rather than a clenched fist. It seems that one of the keys to victory is forbearance and persistence in the face of unreasonable behavior. This along with knowledge and honest debate, I believe will yield success over the long haul.

        • Tom Denman

          If you change your mind please let me know. I want to clarify one perceptual thing. I hardly think that the prohibitionists in this state are all that trustworthy, which is why I am concerned about _how_ the final laws get drafted. But one thing I AM certain of, is the electoral process here in Massachusetts. The transparency is very high and the results (right or wrong) are always the political will of the people.
          I hope the folks in Israel have legal marijuana sooner rather than later, as well as a general peace .

  • Sean

    Actually, what I am tired of is you Stoner Against Legalization 5th column types always finding some excuse to hate on legalization. Tomatoes, corporate weed, GMO, Monsanto are the buzz words that you use in order to scare people into voting for the continued tyranny of prohibition.

  • Nathaniel

    And the ball keeps rolling. One loss simply equals another state’s opportunity to advance this issue before the rest of the country gets on board. I only hope that most of those signatures are legitimate and that this measure can go before the voters. Go go Mass marijuana movement.