Mar 232016
 March 23, 2016

pharmacy medical marijuana michiganBy Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

Chronic pain patients with legal access to medicinal cannabis significantly decrease their use of opioids, according to data published online ahead of print in The Journal of Pain.

Investigators at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor conducted a retrospective survey of 244 chronic pain patients. All of the subjects in the survey were qualified under Michigan law to consume medicinal cannabis and frequented an area dispensary to obtain it.

Authors reported that respondents often substituted cannabis for opiates and that many rated marijuana to be more effective.

“Among study participants, medical cannabis use was associated with a 64% decrease in opioid use, decreased number and side effects of medications, and an improved quality of life,” they concluded. “This study suggests that many chronic pain patients are essentially substituting medical cannabis for opioids and other medications for chronic pain treatment, and finding the benefit and side effect profile of cannabis to be greater than these other classes of medications.”

About 40 people die daily from opioid overdoses, according to the US Centers for Disease Control.

Clinical trial data published last month in The Clinical Journal of Pain reported that daily, long-term herbal cannabis treatment is associated with improved pain relief, sleep and quality of life outcomes, as well as reduced opioid use, in patients unresponsive to conventional analgesic therapies.

The results of a 2015 Canadian trial similarly concluded that chronic pain patients who consumed herbal cannabis daily for one-year experienced reduced discomfort and increased quality of life compared to controls, and did not possess an increased risk of serious side effects.

Separate data published in 2014 in The Journal of the American Medical Association determined that states with medical marijuana laws experience far fewer opiate-related deaths than do states that prohibit the plant. Investigators from the RAND Corporation reported similar findings in 2015, concluding, “States permitting medical marijuana dispensaries experience a relative decrease in both opioid addictions and opioid overdose deaths compared to states that do not.” Clinical data published in 2011 in the journal Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics previously reported that the administration of vaporized cannabis “safely augments the analgesic effect of opioids.”

An abstract of the University of Michigan study, “Medical cannabis associated with decreased opiate medication use in retrospective cross-sectional survey of chronic pain patients,” appears online here.

Source: NORML - make a donation

About Johnny Green

Johnny Green is a marijuana activist from Oregon. He has a Bachelor's Degree in Public Policy. Follow Johnny Green on Facebook and Twitter. Also, feel free to email any concerns.
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  • saynotohypocrisy

    How much evidence do the alcohol supremacists need before they admit that cannabis is medicine? The President isn’t doing his job, Congress isn’t doing their job, and the courts aren’t doing their job. By any fair standard, they are being criminally negligent, and morally degenerate.
    Obama stabbed us in the back. He promised to be guided by science in making policy. Now he’s a liar with blood on his hands..

  • shane

    Well Hillary said there is not enough scientific evidence and the head of DEA said medical cannabis is a sham. You see, it’s not the science that makes policy, it’s one’s personal views despite science, so as long as this is the case, we are stuck having to depend on deadly pharmaceuticals for pain relief or just deal with it I guess.

    • saynotohypocrisy

      It’s utterly insane and utterly intolerable. Senator Warren’s request to the CDC is about the only current political ray of hope.

      The patient advocacy groups seem very committed to their polite, state by state, lobbying intensive efforts.
      Possibly they are so involved in that effort to work with legislators that they don’t see the ever increasing outrageous of medical marijuana prohibition, both because of the rapidly increasing medical grade evidence available that it is medicine, and because of the lopsided support of public opinion for MMJ.
      It’s insane how much suffering and death medical marijuana prohibition is causing, and that should be shouted from the rooftops, and the patient advocacy groups are the folks best qualified to lead that effort

  • Bongstar420

    Look at the two maps. Oregon has some of the highest Cannabis use rates, and yet it is still ranked in the 2nd to highest group opioid use rates.

    California better fits the claim of inverse relation.