Aug 012015
 August 1, 2015

michigan medical marijuana town hallThese tired eyes saw a marvelous thing today. They saw hope restored.

Fathers high-fived with their children. Old men shed tears. Strangers embraced as if friends.

Autism was recommended to be included in the list of illnesses covered under the protections of the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act. Although there still remains one hurdle to be cleared, this vote was the most crucial moment in the process of adding this illness to the list of conditions covered by the Act.

Forty people erupted in applause and cheers when the announcement was made. I saw children, who could not possibly appreciate the magnitude of what just happened, jumping up and down in excitement. They saw that their parents were filled with joy, and they became that way, too.

But such is the way of despair, as well. When parents are nervous, suspicious – marijuana’s illegality generates this in parents who are using cannabis oils to treat their kids- those characteristics are reflected in the behaviors of the children.

The solution is not to remove from that child the medicine that improves, prolongs or saves their life- the solution is to remove the criminality from the action of improving, prolonging or saving that child’s life.

In Michigan, that reality is one step closer. Although we celebrate today’s event, we are also keenly aware that the medicines most widely used by parents to treat autism in children remain out of the protective scope of the medical marijuana laws themselves.

As far as protecting the children and their parents is concerned, we have miles to go before we sleep. Miles to go, and promises to keep.

Just like those children, imitating the excitement their parents showed, I too felt like jumping up and down. Our state’s medical marijuana patients have taken a beating for quite some time now. Victories are hard to come by, and when one comes around it’s easy to get swept up in the emotion of the moment.

Problem with that is, the moment has long since passed and I am still caught up in the emotion of it all.

These tired eyes indeed saw a marvelous thing today. They felt hope being restored in their owner.

Source: The Compassion Chronicles

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About Rick Thompson

"Rick Thompson was the Editor in Chief for the entire 2-year run of the Michigan Medical Marijuana Magazine, was the spokesman for the Michigan Association of Compassion Centers and is the current Editor and Lead Blogger for The Compassion Chronicles. Rick has addressed committees in both the House and Senate, has authored over 200 articles on marijuana and is a professional photographer."Rick Thompson Is An Author At The Compassion Chronicles and focuses on all things Michigan.
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  2 Responses to “Michigan Medical Marijuana Review Panel Approves Autism”

  1.  

    Hello Rick,
    Our son was born with a rare Chromosome deletion and moderate to severe Autistic symptoms . He is now 24 yrs old and is having adverse effects from his 14 yrs of Pyscho RX meds. We are looking for alternative meds and a dr. that has an alternative mind set for our sons psychiatric approach to his medicine therapy. We are just starting to explore this venue and would appreciate any help. We live in northern Indiana.

  2.  

    Hi, I am a resident of Michigan and have an 8 year old daughter with severe anxiety and anger issues. This has been ongoing for almost 9 months now, and is progressively getting worse. I’m sending her to a neurologist soon to see if they can find anything wrong and have some answers. I am not an advocate of prescription drugs for things like this with children of this age, however, her doctor prescribed her Zoloft a couple months back which I have refused to give her due to side effects. I’ve tried other options from natural remedies from the health food store, therapy, chiropractic work, and nothing has made a difference. I’m starting to lean towards finding a doctor in our area who would agree to try medical marijuana to help with her. Is this something that a doctor would agree to? How do I go about doing this??

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