May 122014
 May 12, 2014

missouri marijuana decriminalization hb 512 testimonyCourtesy of The Joint Blog

With overwhelming support Missouri’s House and Senate has approved Senate Bill 491, a proposal to reform the state’s criminal code which includes a provisionthat decriminalizes the possession of up to 10 grams of cannabis. The measure, which has been sent to Governor Jay Nixon for consideration, was approved 29 to 2 in the Senate, and 140 to 15 in the House. The supermajority vote means that the Legislature would likely override a veto if Governor Nixon decides to take that route.

Under current Missouri law, the possession of any amount of cannabis can net someone a prison sentence of up to a year. Under Senate Bill 491, the charge for possessing of up to 10 grams of cannabis would be reduced to a simple fine, similar to a traffic ticket.

The measure includes several other reforms, including removing a mandate that finds someone convicted for the third time on a drug felony charge automatically denied probation and parole.

Governor Nixon has yet to declare what he’ll do with the bill; he has the option of vetoing it, signing it into law or allowing it to become law without his signature.

Source: TheJointBlog.Com

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  20 Responses to “Missouri Marijuana Decriminalization Bill Sent To Governor”

  1.  

    Baby steps I guess. Now let me grow up to 6 plants!

    •  

      Couldnt agree more Mr. Bloomington

    •  

      They are up for approval to grow non THC Hemp in TN. I will be happy to see fields of it soon and hope to build a small house with it. Best building material ever and I am prohibited from having it for that or any purpose? Tell me where the Love is in that?

  2.  

    Missouri citizen here… About time for Missouri together serious about doing away with these backward laws. The people and now Senate / Legislature have spoke. Gov. Nixon ought to sign this to show he considers the will of his constituents. Good for Missouri to take a lead on this issue here in the Midwest.

  3.  

    I hope this gets passed. It’s not the legalization or medical bill I have been hoping for but it’s a step in the right direction for Missouri. I’m born and raised in the st. Louis area and I know many people that would benefit from cannabis being legalized including myself.

  4.  

    This BETTER pass!!!

  5.  

    This act provides that a first time offense of possession of 10 grams or less of marijuana is a Class D misdemeanor rather than a Class A misdemeanor. If you have ever been busted before, no change. This does me no good whatsoever. At least it’s a step in the right direction.

  6.  

    is there any chance they will go recreational?

    •  

      Not before 2016 presidential election. And that’s only if show-me cannabis can get enough signatures to put it on the ballot.

  7.  

    will we be able to grow?

  8.  

    BS 10 gram limits and still gets a ticket! F that.
    We need to be set free from any form of prohibition dealing with
    cannabis. We will once the cash starts
    rolling into the states like it has in Colorado.

    •  

      Give it time. This is a step in the right direction. The states will see the economy in Colorado booming, as they already have, and take all of that into consideration. Don’t be upset because there is no instant gratification. Be happy with what progress has been made, not only in legislation, but in the minds of Americans.

  9.  

    (OEF Vet here and resident of MO) Check this out

    Missouri’s SB 951 Allows medical marijuana for medical use and provides that it shall be taxed at 8 percent of the purchase price Sponsor: Holsman LR Number : 4158S.01I Fiscal Note available Committee:General LawsLast Action:4/22/2014 – SCS Voted Do Pass S General Laws Committee (4158S.05C)Journal Page:Title:Calendar Position:Effective Date:August 28, 2014Full Bill Text|All Actions|Amendments/CCRs/CCSs|Available Summaries|Senate Home Page|List of 2014 Senate BillsCurrent Bill Summary
    SCS/SB 951 – Currently, marijuana is a Schedule I controlled substance that has no accepted medical use. This act changes marijuana to a Schedule II controlled substance making it acceptable for medical use with severe restrictions.

    The act exempts from prosecution qualified patients or primary caregivers possessing a registry identification card issued by the Department of Health and Senior Services for the use or possession of post-processed products containing medical cannabinoids. The products may be in a form of an ingestible that is not smokeable or in the form of a hard candy or an oil, tonic, ointment, or other type of topical medication.

    To become a qualified patient, a person must have a debilitating condition as defined in the act, and have written certification from an attending physician. Attending physicians will also not be prosecuted or subject to arrest for providing written certification for the medical use of post-processed products. A qualified patient’s products cannot be confiscated so long as the patient can present a registry identification card or written certification.

    Any qualified patient or primary caregiver who has not received a registry identification card, but who has met other conditions, may use evidence of the need for post-processed products as an affirmative defense to a charge of possession.

    The act provides that the fraudulent misrepresentation to an officer of any fact relating to the use of products containing medical cannabinoids in order to avoid arrest shall be a misdemeanor subject to a five hundred dollar fine.

    The act defines a medical post-products center as a business licensed by the Department of Health and Senior Services for the lawful cultivation of medical cannabinoids for the purpose of producing post-processed products for medical use and selling of such products. The Department of Health and Senior Services must promulgate rules regarding the licensing process for medical post-processed products centers and only 50 centers may be validly operating in the state at a time. Medical post-processed products centers are not to obtain cannabinoids from outside the state in violation of federal law, and may only lawfully sell to qualified patients and primary caregivers with registry identification cards.

    Post-processed products shall be taxed at eight percent of the purchase price paid or charged.

    This act is similar to HB 1421 (2012).

    MEGHAN LUECKE

  10.  

    (OEF Vet here and resident of MO) Check this out

    Missouri’s SB 951 Allows medical marijuana for medical use and provides that it shall be taxed at 8 percent of the purchase price Sponsor: Holsman LR Number : 4158S.01I Fiscal Note available Committee:General LawsLast Action:4/22/2014 – SCS Voted Do Pass S General Laws Committee (4158S.05C)Journal Page:Title:Calendar Position:Effective Date:August 28, 2014Full Bill Text|All Actions|Amendments/CCRs/CCSs|Available Summaries|Senate Home Page|List of 2014 Senate BillsCurrent Bill Summary
    SCS/SB 951 – Currently, marijuana is a Schedule I controlled substance that has no accepted medical use. This act changes marijuana to a Schedule II controlled substance making it acceptable for medical use with severe restrictions.

    The act exempts from prosecution qualified patients or primary caregivers possessing a registry identification card issued by the Department of Health and Senior Services for the use or possession of post-processed products containing medical cannabinoids. The products may be in a form of an ingestible that is not smokeable or in the form of a hard candy or an oil, tonic, ointment, or other type of topical medication.

    To become a qualified patient, a person must have a debilitating condition as defined in the act, and have written certification from an attending physician. Attending physicians will also not be prosecuted or subject to arrest for providing written certification for the medical use of post-processed products. A qualified patient’s products cannot be confiscated so long as the patient can present a registry identification card or written certification.

    Any qualified patient or primary caregiver who has not received a registry identification card, but who has met other conditions, may use evidence of the need for post-processed products as an affirmative defense to a charge of possession.

    The act provides that the fraudulent misrepresentation to an officer of any fact relating to the use of products containing medical cannabinoids in order to avoid arrest shall be a misdemeanor subject to a five hundred dollar fine.

    The act defines a medical post-products center as a business licensed by the Department of Health and Senior Services for the lawful cultivation of medical cannabinoids for the purpose of producing post-processed products for medical use and selling of such products. The Department of Health and Senior Services must promulgate rules regarding the licensing process for medical post-processed products centers and only 50 centers may be validly operating in the state at a time. Medical post-processed products centers are not to obtain cannabinoids from outside the state in violation of federal law, and may only lawfully sell to qualified patients and primary caregivers with registry identification cards.

    Post-processed products shall be taxed at eight percent of the purchase price paid or charged.

    This act is similar to HB 1421 (2012).

    MEGHAN LUECKE

  11.  

    In a way, I like the decriminalization route to better marijuana laws. Getting caught with a small amount will no longer destroy someone’s life due to lack of job prospects, incarceration, etc. And it keeps the wraps on advertising, dispensaries, public use and other issues that fire up the ignorant opponents. However, I think the cultivation of some number of plants should also be included in this change. This would require some modification in the amount of cannabis allowed. If the plants aren’t harvested then that material should not be considered as part of the 10 gram limit. Basically, a person could have a substantial amount of cannabis within their own residence and not be bothered by these ridiculous swat raids and over-zealous police atrocities. If a person has to bring their stash with them to the park, then ticket them for the under 10 gram amount. Almost all of the problems associated with cannabis usage would disappear with these rules.

    •  

      I agree somewhat with what you propose. The 10 gram limit should be changed to an ounce with no ticket below that amount. Also allow home grow with 6 plants or more.

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