new approach oregon
Ending Marijuana Prohibition

New Approach Oregon Launches New Effort To Defend Marijuana Legalization Law

new approach oregonThe successful campaign to legalize marijuana has launched a new effort to defend Oregon’s marijuana law from those who are trying to undermine the measure.

“We want a marijuana policy that reflects the will of the people,” said Anthony Johnson, chief petitioner for Measure 91. “Instead of making major changes, the state first needs to get the basics of implementation right — like childproofing, labeling, testing, packaging, auditing, inspecting, taxing, licensing and background checks.”

In places like Colorado, marijuana retail sales began before comprehensive rules for edibles and packaging were completed and in place, contributing to difficulties in implementing the new marijuana law.

“We don’t want to see that happen in Oregon,” said Leah Maurer, who led the Mom’s for Yes on 91 group.

New Approach Oregon will now work as the watchdog for the new marijuana law. From time to time, we will let you know what you can do to make sure we finish the job and get Measure 91 implemented effectively. We will update you on what is happening with implementation and alert you about threats to Measure 91.

WHAT’S NEWS: New Approach launches campaign to defend marijuana law.

WHAT’S HAPPENING: 15-minute press conference.

WHEN/WHERE: 11am at The ACLU of Oregon, 620 SW 5th Ave., Portland, OR Tomorrow, February 5, 2015

WHO: 

  • Leah Maurer, from Moms for Yes on 91.
  • Richard Harris, former Director of Addictions and Mental Health Services for the State of Oregon.
  • Anthony Johnson, Measure 91 chief petitioner.
  • David Fidanque, Executive Director of the ACLU of Oregon.

Although two previous attempts to legalize marijuana had failed, Oregon voters in 2014 passed Measure 91 by a 12-point margin during a non-presidential election, winning in 14 counties in the state, with 847,865 yes votes, 145,710 petition signatures, more than 52,000 Facebook fans, 50,000 people on its email list, hundreds of donors, thousands of volunteers and endorsements from 15 newspaper editorial boards.

But there are some people who would like to take marijuana policy in a direction that’s different from what Oregonians voted for. Among the proposals that have already been introduced or advocated are to:

New Approach Oregon does not represent any industry group, any special interest group or any ideology. We represent the moderate middle, advocates for the sensible marijuana policy that a strong majority of Oregonians voted for last November. We won a better approach to marijuana. Now it’s time to follow through by making sure that the better approach to marijuana gets implemented.

Source: New Approach Oregon

  • Sinclair

    So far it seams they got a good plan going. Hopefully they won’t take till 2016 to finalize everything.

    • Nathaniel

      Additionally, there are a reasonable amount of republicans who are saying let the measure stand as proposed. It has bipartisan support which is why I think we can keep everything we voted for. This measure, barring a few oversights regarding hiring and firing, was pretty solid.

      • Bongstar420

        You act as though average voters fully read and fully understood everything in the measure….I seriously doubt that

  • Taxing and licensing?

    Every tax, every regulation comes with it an army of bureaucrats and behind that an army (with guns) of enforcers.

    No more taxed or regulated than tomatoes.

    We are having a hard enough time getting rid of the DEA. Do we want to add new armies we will have to defeat?

    Do we want a legal cartel to replace an illegal one?

    • Bongstar420

      There is no way to escape force…..no one is trying to get rid of the DEA. Stop the trying to paint things according to your desires. People do not want heroin on the shelves next to Tylenol.

      • Well I’m trying to get rid of the DEA. It has no purpose allowed by the Constitution.

        You might remember that our country was founded on the principle of LIMITED government. I’m engaged in a movement to limit it further. Just as some 40 years back I joined in a movement to end Prohibition.

        Every tax, every regulation comes with it an army of bureaucrats and behind that an army (with guns) of enforcers.

        He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harrass our people, and eat out their substance.

        No more taxed or regulated than tomatoes.

      • pbppbp

        Not sure if this thread is alive…but regulations and taxes and the feds are killing the biz…I own a great shop and I’m grateful, but government is killing it…

  • Dan Bontio

    That opt-out business really bugs me.

    What are they afraid of? If they want to opt-out, hold an election and put it on a ballot.

    They way these 5-person commissioner panels run things, it only takes 3 people to shut down an entire county.

    The Oregon initiative was very well thought out in this regard, but petty tyrants–like all tyrants–don’t like giving up power. (In this case, they’d be giving that power to their own people… but they don’t seem to care in the slightest about that.)

  • purejoy

    Way to go Anthony! We need someone to take them on and having such an audience already makes your disapproval carry more weight.

  • Bongstar420

    Interesting. 20 years ago, prohibition was the will of the people…I bet you were all about supporting that. Stop the BS> you want what you want and you will hide behind democratic support if it benefits you.