New Canadian Poll Shows Strong Support For Marijuana Law Reform


Oh CannabisBy Phillip Smith

Just days after Canada’s opposition Liberal Party adopted a marijuana legalization resolution, a new poll suggests the Grits have their fingers placed firmly on the pulse of the electorate. The poll found that nearly two-thirds favor decriminalizing or legalizing marijuana, while only 20% support leaving the laws the way they are now.

The poll, conducted by Forum Research and published in the National Post Tuesday, found that 40% of Canadians said marijuana “should be taxed and legalized,” while 26% favored decriminalization. Respondents in every province produced majorities for legalization/decrim, ranging from a high of 73% in British Columbia to a low of 61% in Quebec.

When it came to “it should be taxed and legalized,” support was again strongest in British Columbia at 50% and lowest in Quebec at 36%. Support for legalization was at 42% in the Atlantic provinces, 40% in the Prairie province, and 38% in Quebec.

The poll is roughly in line with other Canada polls in the past decade, although giving respondents both a legalization and a decriminalization choice may have lowered support for legalization somewhat. Four polls taken since 2004 had support for legalization ranging between 51% and 55%, while five polls since 2003 have found support for decriminalization (asked various ways) ranging from 59% to 83%.

In any case, this most recent poll is not good news for the Conservatives, who are attempting to push through their draconian C-10 crime bill, which seeks increased penalties for some marijuana offenses, including mandatory minimum sentences for growing as few as six plants. Only 11% of respondents said marijuana penalties should be increased.

Article From StoptheDrugWar.orgCreative Commons Licensing


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