May 122015
 May 12, 2015

safer michigan marijuanaAttorney Jeffrey Hank, Chairman of the Michigan Comprehensive Cannabis Law Reform Initiative (MILegalize), said the organization’s proposal to legalize marijuana in Michigan is uniquely suited to address the funding shortages by the failure of Proposal 1 on Tuesday evening. In fact, he’d like to sit down with the Governor and talk about it.

“Our Initiative would direct profits from a reasonable excise tax on legalized marijuana to fund road repair, to support schools and to add financial resources to local communities,” Hank said. “But more than that, the MILegalize proposal offers the best plan for small business generation and small businesses are the backbone of the state’s economic growth. Cities keep control, cities set the rules and cities get the reward.”

The overwhelming defeat of Proposal 1 indicates the public is not supportive of standard tax-based solutions to financial deficit. Conversely, a local ballot proposal to legalize marijuana was overwhelmingly approved by East Lansing voters on Tuesday with a 65.5% YES vote. Hank led the effort to place the proposal before East Lansing voters; he hopes the sales tax question’s failure, and the success of the local legal question, will prompt Governor Snyder to sit down and discuss the MILegalize plan.

“The MILegalize proposal is a fresh, out-of-the-box opportunity based on successful programs from other states,” Hank said. “It is not the whole solution to Michigan’s financial struggle, but it will give a much-needed boost to fix the roads and support kids, their teachers and schools.”

Under the MILegalize ballot proposal, legalized adult use of marijuana would be restricted to adults 21 years of age and older. Distribution and cultivation centers would have to be zoned and approved by the local community before applying to a state agency. Several aspects of the proposal imitate the privileges contained in the state medical marijuana law, including a 12 plant limit on cultivation and protection for minor patients who have a physician’s recommendation for marijuana use.

“Proposal 1’s failure is just more evidence that the time is now for legalized marijuana in Michigan,” said Jamie Lowell, a MILegalize Director. “The voters are clearly on board for legalization.”

For more information regarding the MILegalize proposal, please visit:

www.milegalize.com

Source: The Compassion Chronicles

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About Rick Thompson

"Rick Thompson was the Editor in Chief for the entire 2-year run of the Michigan Medical Marijuana Magazine, was the spokesman for the Michigan Association of Compassion Centers and is the current Editor and Lead Blogger for The Compassion Chronicles. Rick has addressed committees in both the House and Senate, has authored over 200 articles on marijuana and is a professional photographer."Rick Thompson Is An Author At The Compassion Chronicles and focuses on all things Michigan.
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  6 Responses to ““NO” Vote On Proposal 1 Creates New Dialog In Michigan On Legalized Marijuana”

  1.  

    How much tax can MJ support? Think of taxing tomatoes. Hot house tomatoes go for on the order of $5 a lb. Only tomato prohibition would support a high tax. Licensing tomato growers etc.

    Every tax, every regulation comes with it an army of bureaucrats and behind that an army (with guns) of enforcers.

    No more taxed or regulated than tomatoes.

    •  

      The thing is, tomatoes do not have psychoactive components. I could make the same argument about boiling some fermented grain mash in a tall column and harvesting what boils off first, but it turns out stills are also illegal because alcohol is regulated. Oh, and you still pay taxes on tomatoes. Maybe not on the tomato itself, but most of the cost of that tomato is transportation, warehousing, overhead, etc. and every component of that is taxed. Want legalized MJ? Me too, but accept that you are going to have to accept some level of financial burden on the sale of said products in order for some groups to agree with legalization. And anyway, it will still most likely be cheaper than black market prices.

  2.  

    If Michigan needs more money let them use the savings they get from ending Prohibition.

    •  

      Only freedom from oppressive unconstitutional pot and hemp laws can save the American tax-payer and small farmer… Nothing says America like a ball/cap, shirt, pants, socks, shoes, and shoestrings made from Virginian/hemp and a bag of Colorado/homegrown…That’s the America I grew up in…

  3.  

    Ridiculousness. How do you get from conservative rejection of higher sales tax to…”this is a mandate for drug legalization”? Somebody has been using too much of the product in Colorado and has proven the detriment that will occur to Michigan intelligence and subsequent destruction of positive economic progress!

  4.  

    Does Michigan believe in freedom… Nothing says America like a ball/cap, shirt, pants, socks, shoes, and shoestrings made from Virginian/hemp and a bag of Colorado/homegrown…That’s the America I grew up in…

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