Jan 312012
 January 31, 2012

Regulate marijuanaby Phillip Smith

A voter survey commissioned by California’s Regulate Marijuana Like Wine (RMLW) initiative campaign suggests the initiative could win at the polls in November–if it manages to make it on the ballot in the first place.

RMLW is one of handful of proposed 2012 California marijuana legalization initiatives, all of them ill-funded. For any of them to make the ballot, they have to come up with more than 500,000 valid voter signatures by April, a task that is considered almost impossibly to accomplish by volunteer efforts alone.

RMLW commissioned the poll in a bid to show potential funders it could win in November, and with these poll results, the campaign can now make that argument. California initiative watchers estimate that it would take between $1 and $2 million in paid signature-gathering to make the ballot.

The statewide poll of 800 likely voters conducted by Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates found support for the initiative at 62%, with 35% opposed and 3% undecided. No cross-tabs have been made available.

The poll found even higher levels of support for more general critiques of current drug laws and the level of attention California law enforcement pays to marijuana. Four out of five respondents (80%) agreed with the statement, “State and federal drug laws are outdated and have failed, therefore, we need to take a new approach that makes sense for today,” while 71% agreed that law enforcement spends too much, time, money, and resources enforcing marijuana laws.

If RMLW were to pass, the California Legislative Analyst’s Office has projected “savings of potentially several tens of millions of dollars annually to state and local governments of the costs of incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders,” as well as potentially generating “hundreds of millions of dollars in net additional tax revenues related to the production and sale of marijuana products.”

“There is no policy that is more discriminatory or wastes more tax dollars,” said RMLW treasurer Steve Collett, who hailed the poll results. “This initiative helps farmers, reduces prison overcrowding, relieves burdens on the courts, generates revenues for the state, and frees up police to work on real crimes.”

The results also encouraged Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP) co-founder Jack Cole. “LEAP believes the citizens of California are far ahead of the federal government in assessing a policy that will reduce death, disease, crime, and corruption, when they register 62% support for the initiative Regulate Marijuana Like Wine,” he said.

Proponents of the competing marijuana legalization initiatives are working to set up a joint meeting, a so-called “Cannadome” in the Bay Area for mid-February. Whether these new poll results will make any difference in forging unity then remains to be seen.

Article From StoptheDrugWar.orgCreative Commons Licensing

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About Jay Smoker

I have been smoking marijuana for almost twenty years and I have no plans to stop anytime soon. My life was turned upside down in 2009 after getting arrested and tossed in jail for being in the wrong state with legal medical marijuana. I got fed up, and I now devote all my time to ending this insanity.I am responsible for the technical side of this project, but try to chip in when I can, either with syndicated articles or original content.Follow me on Facebook and Twitter.Feel free to email. any questions or concerns. Peace!
  • malcolm kyle

    Prohibition is overwhelmingly responsible for an immense increase in organized crime, international terrorism, rampant official corruption, a broken economy, mass unemployment and a serious undermining of international security and development.

    Corporate greed and individual bigotry have accelerated us towards a situation where all the usual peaceful and democratic methods, which can usually be employed to reverse such acute damage, no longer function as our founders intended. Such a political impasse coupled with our great economic tribulation is precisely that which throughout history has often ignited extreme social upheaval and violent revolution.

    “To function as the founders intended, our republic requires that the tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure.”
    – Thomas Jefferson, in a letter to William Stephens Smith, November 13, 1787

    Fortunately we are left with one last peaceful avenue for change — Jury Nullification.

    Jury Nullification is a constitutional doctrine that allows juries to acquit defendants who are technically guilty but do not deserve punishment. – All non-violent ‘drug offenders’ who are not selling to children – be they users, dealers or importers – clearly belong in this category.

    If you sincerely believe that prohibition is a dangerous and counter-productive policy then you must stop helping to enforce it. When it comes to acquittals, you, the juror, have the very last word!

    * It only takes one juror to prevent a guilty verdict.
    * You are not lawfully required to disclose your voting intention before taking your seat on a jury.
    * You are also not required to give a reason to the other jurors for your position when voting – just simply state you find the accused not guilty.

    We must create what we can no longer afford to wait for – PLEASE VOTE TO ACQUIT!

    • http://weedblog.com Zachary Everett

      of course I would vote to acquit…if I could. Tens of thousands of good citizens like myself are denied the ability to sit on juries of those being prosecuted for drug crimes, in some States we are even disenfranchised from our right to vote. Our crime, we are marijuana drug felons. The issue of using the courts and other legal political methods are stacked against the anti-prohibition forces. I’m afraid Thomas Jefferson had it correct, the tree of liberty must be refreshed by the blood of patriots and tyrants alike.

  • martin

    I feel as if Marijuana has had bad rep since Biblical times and should be studied correctly. We been in this debt for years and its obvious that California is making big turn around in this economy due to their Marijuana laws…what politics see is ppl getting but what I see is a bunch of old scared men that are afraid of change look at how alcohol is killing ppl everyday…

  • Oscar

    I hope they can unit. Unity in this community is a must if we want to challenge the federal government and win. The people are hungry for change and the best way to do it is to get the feds to fall in a defensive posture on an issue that is indefensible. 2012 is the year of change, with or without the supposed president of change.

  • Chris Hawkes

    The DEA is part of department of the treasury. That in and of itself is twisted and wrong. The DEA derives all of its power from the 18 words that make up the interstate commerce clause.
    In the 1970s Nixon created the DEA to fight the marijuana war, and of course the minor sideshow drugs. In the same time frame our country went off the gold standard, to money that is backed by nothing. This means all the money now flows from Washington, and or the federal reserve. This greatly reduced states rights, and state sovereignty. This is why you have 100% of CA’s federal congress and senate voting against legalization. The federal government has the power to send California into a depression that would make third world countries look rich.
    But on the other hand, if the feds did that, the whole country would turn against them.
    This issue has more to do with power and control, than cannabis.

    62% / 35% are impressive numbers, I pray to God this makes the ballot. I pray for our country, and my family.

  • fullofhops

    Why use up the forests which were centuries in the making and the mines which required ages to lay down, if we can get the equivalent of forest and mineral products in the annual growth of the hemp fields. …. Henry Ford YES WE CANNABIS