responsibleohio ohio marijuana
Ending Marijuana Prohibition

ResponsibleOhio Starts Gathering Signatures For Marijuana Legalization Initiative

responsibleohio ohio marijuanaResponsibleOhio has cleared a major hurdle in its effort to legalize recreational marijuana in Ohio. The Ohio Ballot Board has approved the most current version of the initiative, which clears the way for the group to start gathering signatures. The group’s previous version of the initiative was rejected by Ohio’s Attorney General. Per The Chronicle Telegram:

The Ohio Ballot Board, chaired by Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted, approved the measure as one issue during a meeting Friday. Had the board decided it was more than one issue, ResponsibleOhio would have had to refine its language and resubmit it to Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine’s office for approval.

ResponsibleOhio must gather the signatures of at least 305,591 registered voters in order for the legalization effort to be put in front of voters, something the investor-backed group hopes to do by the July deadline in order to make the November ballot.

“We have the procedural stuff in place to begin our signature effort, which is exciting,” ResponsibleOhio spokeswoman Lydia Bolander said.

She said the group will use a mix of paid and volunteer workers to gather the necessary signatures and they intend to collect as many as 500,000 signatures to ensure enough of them are valid.

ResponsibleOhio has received a lot of criticism from veteran activists and reform organization leaders for the monopoly-ish model the initiative creates. The original initiative language gave the sole right to grow marijuana to just ten entities. The newer version of the initiative allows for home cultivation of up to four plants, as long as the grower has a license. How hard a license will be to get is unclear at this time.

  • joseph amlin

    May I ask why in the he’ll do we have to have a damn llicense to grow if it’s going fully legal wouldn’t you think the businesses that’s selling it would keep a record on a hard drive to know who has there growing rights still instead of goin through the hasel to even be licensed

  • wowFAD

    Getting licensed to grow your own is a little odd. I’m not 100% certain, but I’m fairly sure you don’t need a license for micro-brewing at home. You can order little packets of yeast and make your own beer without bothering with any sort of paperwork or legal hastle. The fact that the initiative has a home cultivation option is *something* at least.

    When last I checked, I heard Ohio had competing initiatives, like California. I hope that isn’t the case and that the disparate groups are now working together. United we stand and all that jazz, right?

    Fact is, 2016 is going to be a crucial election for dealing some decisively important body-blows to cannabis prohibition. Right now, five states and Washington DC have legalized recreational consumption. Adding Ohio to the ever-growing list of states and municipalities that have reformed their laws for the better gives hope to those of us who don’t live in states with any sort of initiative process. Those of us in states like Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia who have corrupt, nearly useless state legislatures see federal/national legalization as our only salvation, so every new state that reforms its laws brings *all* of us that much closer to Victory Day.

    Ohio is a crucial battleground state in Presidential elections, just like Florida. Putting cannabis reform on the ballot in a general election in both Ohio and Florida will (hopefully) increase voter turnout in both those states. Higher turnout is always a good thing. The right exit polling can be enough to light a fire under even the most timid law makers once the demographics show an issue has gained enough steam. Once word gets out that the remnants of Nixon’s “Silent Majority” drug-worriers are no longer of electoral consequence, expect to see more action at the federal level. If, by the end of 2016, there are at least 10 states with full legalization, the “Tipping Point” will be a forgone conclusion.

    • Scott Dahlstrom

      The home grow license will be $50 annually. Not terrible, but I agree that it’s completely unnecessary to begin with. As for the groups working together? Sadly, no. The Ohio Rights Group seems to be putting the bulk of their efforts into persuading people to vote against Responsible Ohio. Responsible Ohio has enough funds that they don’t really need ORG’s endorsement, but trying to sabotage legalization for the sake of a medical only amendment is just shameful.

      I’ve been a supporter of ORG for a long time. I’ve gathered signatures for them and recruited others to do the same. Now I’m rethinking my allegiances.

      • wowFAD

        I’m really sorry to hear that. One would think legalization for the purposes of recreational use *first* would render special protections for medical use (tax considerations, etc) easier to achieve, afterwards. IMHO, it’s only reasonable to support the initiative that protects the most number of people from being arrested, as that is truly priority #1. The why/how of consumption isn’t nearly as important as that. I’m really worried for Ohio because the way I learned about the two “competing” initiatives was by witnessing the online antagonism being generated. Ohio is not a sure-thing, so being attacked by other so-called fellow “advocates” is more than just counter-productive, it’s fantastically stupid. We can’t afford in-fighting. The polling said Florida was a sure-thing, but mistakes (and enemies) were made along the way, and in the end, it failed by less than 3%.

        • Scott Dahlstrom

          Fantastically stupid is right.

          • jontomas

            No. Stupid is any who fall for this deception and fail to vote for RO to end their own persecution.

        • eric

          If you want to support the initiative that will protect the most people in ohio then support Ohioans for cannabis , not responsible ohio…

          • jontomas

            Nonsense. – No knowledgeable marijuana consumers, or voter, would be against Responsible Ohio.

            Marijuana reform is not about the growers/sellers. It’s about ending the vicious, governmental persecution of millions of good Americans who prefer near harmless marijuana over very harmful alcohol.

            Responsible Ohio does that.

          • eric

            No it doesn’t for the same reasons I listed above. Anybo s you can read the amendment proposal online from both organizations and decide for them selves

    • Sinclair

      You are right about the brew your own beer it’s 100 gal per year per 21 yr old up to 200 gal for 2 adults. A license to grow your own is nothing but a ploy to track use.

  • Smoke Prone

    The one thing I don’t like about the signature process is you never know how well they are doing until the deadline. This is one thing in 2015 to get excited about though.

  • Scott Rellim

    License to grow four plants? No thanks. I’ll be collecting signatures for ORG.

    • jontomas

      Wow. Just because freedom doesn’t come all at once, just the way you want it, you’re willing to throw all of Ohio’s marijuana consumers under the bus. – Not to mention the whole country that will get freedom quickly after an eastern or Midwest state legalized.

      I’m really tired of the greed factor in all this. It has pushed the true cannabis culture to the side. I wish they would just legalize it everywhere to grow and possess, but not to sell.

      • saynotohypocrisy

        “I wish they would just legalize it everywhere to grow and possess, but not to sell.”

        If enough people would grow it to give it away to folks who can’t grow their own, that would work.
        I share your concern about people seeing $ signs when they look at weed.
        Another option is to only allow non-profits to sell cannabis.

        But only allowing 10 favored groups to sell in the whole state seems the worst alternative of all, the most complete repudiation of of ‘true cannabis culture’.
        I really don’t think you’re taking seriously enough how adamant the legal cartel of 10 is likely to be about protecting their investment by spending freely to beat back attempts to loosen their monopoly. And probably seriously underestimating how offensive cannabis consumers are going to find the requirement to register to grow your 4 allowed plants.

        • jontomas

          The problem with your perspective is you view RO from some ‘ideal’ plan, instead of viewing it from where we are. That’s dealing in fantasy.

          RO moves consumers from governmental persecution to freedom.

          Only someone with a financial interest could be against that.
          Marijuana reform is a process, not an event.

          >>>”If enough people would grow it to give it away to folks who can’t grow their own, that would work.”

          All this oppression has squeezed the cannabis culture into dysfunction. Go to a Rainbow Family gathering to understand.

          Once freed, Many will grow and we WILL give it away to those who don’t. That’s how family does things.

  • Ohio Voter

    This is a CROCK OF SHIT. Cornering the entire industry for the lucky ten investors! Paying for a liscense for 4 measly plants? What they dont tell you is that if you go over the possession or cultivation limits, BY DEFAULT you are subject to current law-felonies, fines, and jail. Some legalization huh?

    Vote NO on this bunk

    • jontomas

      Nonsense. This is WORLDS better than what Ohio has now. Marijuana reform is a process, not an event.

      • khh

        Well said. It’s a good thing the age demographics are so overwhelmingly in favor of legalization. Otherwise, we’d still be trying to legalize into the next century!

        • jontomas

          Yes. It’s been a tough row to hoe. We thought we were going to get legalization when Jimmy Carter was president.

          Then came the PDFA, sponsored by alcohol, pharmaceuticals, and who knows, who. – And Ronnie Raygun. – Plunged back into darkness again until 1996.

          These perfect-legalization folks don’t realize that could happen again at any time. That’s why we can’t waste this golden window of opportunity.

          • Ohio Voter

            Stop Shilling, you pollute some many sections with your deceptive misinformation

          • jontomas

            lol – No. You just don’t like people telling the truth. – Too bad. Someone’s got to stick up for the consumers in this big profiteering shouting match.

          • eric

            I don’t like you shills trying to mislead people by acting like you give a shit about the consumer. The more you advocate for this greed driven proposal the more obvious it becomes that your a shill for r.o.

          • jontomas

            We clearly don’t have any financial interest in marijuana. We ARE the consumers. Thanks for letting us know how you feel about your precious customers.

          • eric

            You clearly do have interest in the cartel and the more you try flipping your own greed on me the more obvious that becomes shill .

          • jontomas

            The reliable poster wowFAD has already shown how you are lying. Other long-term posters/readers here know I speak the truth as well.

            Go crawl back under your rock.

          • eric

            Wow fad hasn’t shown anything other then he likes to pass judgement on and slander other people who don’t agree with him that responsibleohio is the only and best way to go I busted my a** with hard work to get where I am and I’m not a grower and i do not break the law in any way.The more you and wow fad try to slander my character and use your fancy words of gibberish the more it makes it look like you too are shilling for r.o. I merely voiced my opinion against r.o. and off the bad you insinuated I was a greedy grower. I am not and I do support freedom of the consumer just because we don’t agree with which organization is best doesn’t give us the right to judge each other like this. Enough is enough Jon. If r.o. is truly what you believe is right for ohio that’s your right. Just as its my right to advocate for the group I support. If you truely are not a shill then I’m not your enemy . Either way I’m tired of arguing with you. You made your points and I made mine.

          • jontomas

            The reason I have judged you have a profit agenda is because you have not proved otherwise, and there is no rational basis for the average consumer to vote against ANY re-legalization initiative.

            They all move marijuana consumers from governmental persecution to freedom.

            As long as there is home growing, concerns over who grows and sells commercially PALE in significance.

  • Sinclair

    A license for 4 plants seams fishy. Just call it what it is a medical card. At least they could of made it 6 plants . But then this is still better than what Michigan is doing. The only true legalization is recreational and medical jointly. To put it bluntly you should not need a Drs. prescription to medicate with Marijuana. Plus full legalization will give you other protection like drug test for employers.

  • saynotohypocrisy

    It’s extremely offensive to require a license to grow your own weed when you don’t need one to make your own booze. And all RO wants to do is replace illegal cartels with a legal cartel that will continue to charge black market level prices. And you know the legal cartel would spend huge bucks if necessary to oppose any future changes that would threaten their monopoly on legal sales. I really don’t see how I can vote for this. I think I would have to work against it.

    • jontomas

      Marijuana reform is not about the growers and sellers. It’s about ending the monstrous persecution of millions of good Americans who prefer near harmless marijuana over addictive, very harmful alcohol. – Responsible Ohio does that.

      Any Ohio marijuana consumer would be sadly mistaken to vote against this great opportunity to end that persecution.

      We always knew the big money guys would take over production. – This is America, remember?

      Nothing is cast in stone. We will continue to refine marijuana policy until we arrive at the optimum form, just as we did with alcohol after ending it’s prohibition.

      There is no reason the thousands of Ohio marijuana consumers should suffer the outrageous persecution for one day longer than necessary.

      • Patrick

        This is still going to persecute many people anyone who would want to grow at home would then be charge for an unnecessary license and they can be charge with a felony if they don’t comply. This amendment (which is hard to change) would make it illegal even once it become legal federally. There are so many stipulations that it would be near impossible to grow, plus most renters will not be able to.

        • jontomas

          You call being required to get a license to grow persecution?
          Wow. A little perspective would go a long way. Consumers in Oklahoma, Texas, Alabama, etc. would LOVE to have these “restrictions.” – Not to mention the vast majority of Ohio consumers.

          Quit trying to make money off the persecution of marijuana consumers.

          • saynotohypocrisy

            Do you have a reason for thinking Patrick is trying to make money off the persecution of weed consumers?

            Most poor people aren’t going to be able to grow their own because their landlord won’t let them and they won’t be able to afford the black market level prices the RO legal cartel is going to charge. Throw in the right to have a community marijuana garden and I’d probably go along with it.

            When you say ‘we will continue to refine marijuana policy’, the problem is that the legal cartel behind RO isn’t going to want to refine marijuana policy, they’re going to want to keep their cozy monopoly and keep prices sky high like the ‘big money guys’ you mentioned love to do. And it’s going to be hard to compete with their money to get things changed.

            There’s a legalization proposal in Maine now that would limit the number of dispensaries until 2019. That’s a much more acceptable approach than the open-ended cartelization of legal cannabis advocated by RO.

            Whether it’s persecution or not, there is something big brotherish and creepy about having to registered to grow your 4 lousy plants. Enough of this stinking third class treatment compared to killer alcohol users. People in Ohio are VERY well aware that alcohol is more dangerous to life and limb than weed is, they should be appealed to by reformers on that basis as much as anything else.

          • jontomas

            >>>”Do you have a reason for thinking Patrick is trying to make money off the persecution of weed consumers?”

            Yes. – There is no other reason a “marijuana consumer” would object to ending the vicious persecution of themselves. – ‘Take me to jail, please!”

            >>>”Most poor people aren’t going to be able to grow their own because their landlord won’t let them”

            Why do I suspect your concern for “poor people” is less than genuine? If they really want to grow, they can share a house. Soon, landlords will not care, since marijuana is much less harmful than the beer in the fridge.

            >>>”and they won’t be able to afford the black market level prices the RO legal cartel is going to charge.”

            No. Home growing will keep prices down to earth – likely $50 an ounce, or less, after the dust settles on re-legalization. It’s just a plant.

            >>>”Throw in the right to have a community marijuana garden and I’d probably go along with it.”

            That doesn’t seem far-fetched. Neither RO, nor any marijuana reform, casts policy in stone. We will continue to refine marijuana policy until it reaches its optimum form, just as we did with alcohol after ending ITS prohibition.

            >>>”the problem is that the legal cartel behind RO isn’t going to want to refine marijuana policy,”

            They didn’t want to allow home growing, but consumers expressed the importance and RO relented and changed. Marijuana consumers will be the most powerful force affecting policy.

            >>>”And it’s going to be hard to compete with their money to get things changed.”

            That’s why we have the vote. It works well when used.

            >>>”Enough of this stinking third class treatment compared to killer alcohol users. People in Ohio are VERY well aware that alcohol is more dangerous to life and limb than weed is, they should be appealed to by reformers on that basis as much as anything else.”

            Of course. With the arrival of the Internet, the media-stranglehold on the truth was broken, and now polls show a majority of all Amerians want to end the fraudulent marijuana prohibition. – The vast majority of consumers don’t care who grows and sells it. They just want their freedom – NOW.

        • Ohio Voter

          ^^^

  • Ggg

    Being that you call your selfs responsible Ohio that means I can sue you if somebody kills or injured someone

    • jontomas

      You should do some reading on a subject before you comment. The preponderance of the research shows marijuana is NOT a significant cause of auto accidents

      In February, the Drug and Alcohol Crash Risk report, produced by the Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, found that while drunken driving dramatically increased the risk of getting into an accident, there was no evidence that using marijuana heightened that risk. In fact, after adjusting for age, gender, race and alcohol use, the report found that stoned drivers were no more likely to crash than drivers who were not intoxicated at all.

  • eric

    No thanks r.o. I’ll sign any petition but yours. I am not sacrificing a free market for your monopoly , better options are coming , I can wait. Pretty much everybody I know agrees. We won’t only not be signing your petition , but we will be voting against your b.s. greed driven proposal.

    • jontomas

      What misguided, greedy, destructive nonsense. – That’s what the greedy growers against legalization in California said when they campaigned against Prop 19 in 2010.

      “We can wait. We’ll bring you a BETTER legalization in 2012” – So they worked against Prop 19, and it was narrowly defeated.

      2012 rolled around – nothing on the ballot, 2014 rolled around – nothing on the ballot.

      It will only be due to the major players, once again in 2016, that will finally bring Californians relief after the traitorous actions of these greed-heads.

      I trust the marijuana consumers and freedom lovers of Ohio won’t fall for your forked tongue.

      • eric

        I don’t know who you think your talking to paid shill! Your either a paid shill or your completely ignorant if you support this b.s. legislation .who’s the greed heads trying to corner the market? I trust ohio voters are smart enough not to vote in a legal cartel/ monopoly. America is about a free market and we have sacrificed enough to big money. If somebody truly values freedom they won’t give a multi billion dollar industry to ten people that will reserve the sole right to grow anything more then 4 plants for them selves. Your the one with the forked tongue! Don’t try to flip the the misguided , destructive , greedy nonsense comment on me , that’s you and your b.s. organization shill. I have every right to speak my mind , and I’m calling it what it is. I’m not a grower and I don’t use it but I have somebody close to me who could benefit from it but won’t use it unless it’s legal. so I am all for legalization for reasons other then myself , but I’m also smart enough to see this for what it really is. This isn’t California and there will be better options next year , quit trying to scare people into believing this is the only option that stands a chance. 23 other states have legalized it and Ohio will too in due time. People be smart and don’t jump the gun on bad legislation. Once it’s in the Constitution , it’s very hard to amend.

        • jontomas

          You haven’t refuted a single point I made. Instead:

          >>>”America is about a free market and we have sacrificed enough to big money.”

          How naïve. America is a capitalist country, and the biggest winners do everything they can to rig the game in their favor. This is not quite a free market.

          We have always known the big money folks would take over production and sales. That’s the way America works, and it doesn’t matter to consumers.

          If you want to change the system, great. But don’t try to do it on the backs of millions of good Americans who lives are destroyed and threatened by the monstrously destructive fraud of marijuana prohibition.

          This is about consumers’ freedom. It’s criminal to allow the destruction of people’s lives for years longer than necessary.

          • eric

            The only point your making is that you are willing to sell farmers , and consumers under the bus for big money to corner the market here. These people are not activists they are greedy businessmen and women who care nothing for the consumers. They are wealthy enough and are simply trying to corner the market so they can hold all of the big money. It’s situations like this that is destroying this country. If we keep giving everything to big business it won’t be long before nobody but a select few has anything. Most people I know struggle to pay their bills and keep a roof over their head. Thinking like yours is what has and will continue t o ruin this country. There’s nothing I can do to change the system but I am a true advocate for Sensible Legalization And True freedom and will do everything I can to educate people that this greed driven proposal is not the way to go. Your claim that this is about consumers freedom is misleading. When a few greed driven businessmen control the whole game here I promise you quality will suffer and prices will be ridiculous. You underestimate the intelligence and integrity of consumers. I understand that legalization is long over due but it won’t be long and it will be legalized nationally anyway.
            It is irresponsible and wreck less for anybody to give such power over a whole industry to a few people thru the Constitution , which will be virtually impossible to change . This is not freedom it is a monopoly.

          • jontomas

            Oh, brother. The arguments of people who have no arguments. – Just take what YOU’RE guilty of and charge it against your opponent.
            It is clearly you greedy growers who are trying to throw consumers’ freedom under the bus.

            That you somehow imagine the big money won’t control 90 percent of marijuana sales over the whole country shows how removed from reality you are.

            The future is CLEARLY marijuana sold wherever beer is, next to the Marlboros.

            The system of growing and sales does not matter. Only stopping the persecution of consumers ASAP matters.

            It’s funny to watch pigs try to put on lipstick.

          • eric

            Listen here shill. Don’t sit there and pass judgement on me and call me a greedy seller. You don’t know s*** about me . The more you talk , the more of your own greed and stupidity comes out.! Responsible Ohio and you sellout paid shills are the one trying to put lip stick on the pig. You greedy skum bags are the ones trying to mislead people into believing they should just sacrifice their freedom to a free market which will ensure quality , a fair price , and that supply will meet demand. The system of growing and sales does matter shill , and people are smarter then you give credit. People don’t let these greedy fat cats and their skum bag selfish paid shills mislead you. Vote no to this b.s. and let’s get something better in. If Colorado can do it , we can too.

          • jontomas

            >>>” mislead people into believing they should just sacrifice their freedom to a free market”

            You’re amazing. You want thousands of Ohio marijuana consumers to wait at least two more years to stop their persecution by their own government. And that’s for a very dubious ‘maybe.’

            You are the only one acting to sacrifice consumers’ freedom.

          • eric

            Ok , I too don’t plan on making a penny off Marijuana . I already make good money off the business I started from the ground up ( landscaping). That’s the beauty of a free market. I was able to start up with virtually nothing and build a profitable and successful business and offer my services for a fair price. Being that there is so much competition in my business because anybody and a lot of people do it I have to provide top quality service for an affordable price or I won’t be in business. I truely represent the consumer and the bottom line is this is a very bad idea. I’ve already made some very good points and I understand that it is very important to stop the persecution of so many people by our governments failed prohibition , but that doesn’t mean just settle for a bowl of s*** that is being passed off as cream of wheat. There is not another state where a corporation has wrote themselves exclusive rights in the state constitution to control a the wholr industry. Trust and believe once this is in the Constitution it will be very hard to amend or change , like the casino b.s. in ohio. If there’s not a free market in the u.s. I wouldn’t be in business for myself. There’s no reason to sacrifice a free market to corporate greed here no matter how the subject is twisted and turned. Yes , Ohioans need to wait until next year and do this correctly. Responsible Ohio isn’t doing anything but monopolizing on taking advantage of consumers to make themselves wealthy. They care nothing for the consumer and are no different then the cartels. The only difference they want to lock their cartel into the Constitution. Taxation and regulation is fine , but monopolies are not. In the end this really won’t benefit anybody but the few who control the whole industry.

          • jontomas

            >>>”Ohioans need to wait until next year and do this correctly.”

            That’s exactly what California greedy growers said about Prop 19 in 2010. Yet, here we still are without legalization and those wonderful claims forgotten and ignored.

            Sorry. I don’t believe your lack of financial interest.

            Average marijuana consumers care MUCH more about their freedom than for who is selling them their pot.

          • eric

            Again Jon , this isn’t california and there are other initiatives in the works much better. To tell you the truth I wipe my a** with what you believe , but again I personally have no financial interest in it so believe what you want. I don’t see why you have to be so judgmental toward some one you don’t know anything about but it just shows your arrogance and ignorance and does nothing but hurt your cause. The more you talk the more you show your financial interest in the legal cartel. The average consumer should care about their freedom and allowing a monopoly to write them selves into the Constitution is any thing but freedom.

          • wowFAD

            Eric, I gotta tell you that you — not Jon — are the one who is wrong, here. You seriously want to pass on 2016 because you think waiting “is worth it.” Every person arrested after the Ohio initiative fails will disagree with you, vehemently. Those are the brass tacks in this case. Plus, I’ve had my ear to the ground on this issue for years. I can assure you, Jon isn’t shilling for anyone and has been a loyal advocate for a good while. He’s been dedicated to this issue for quite a long time, and ending prohibition is his only priority. We discussed this issue extensively in the year building up to A64, prior to the 2012 election. I can assure you he’s not shilling for any vested interests.

            I’m as sure of that as sure as I am that every last word he said about CA in 2010 is absolutely true. Splitting the vote between competing initiatives is how cannabis reform in CA was forced into a two-front battle: opponents to the right, and so-called advocates on the left who both managed to erode support. Same thing happened to the Florida 2014 vote — it failed by less than 3% because 22% of self-identified “liberals” thought that voting “no” and waiting for something better was wise. Had just a quarter of that 22% — had a fraction of a fraction of self-described “liberals” voted the right way — Florida wouldn’t be stuck in their current status-quo.

            Eric, you pulled out the word “shill” too fast for you to have anything other than antagonism on your agenda, which tells me you’re the one having your strings pulled, not Jon. And as expected, as is the case with anyone manipulated into a negative campaign, you’re compelled to rally others to your way of thinking for the personal validation. The fact that you’ve elected to undermine the efforts of a group you (not Jon) perceive as your competition proves this is so. Ask yourself, what is the difference between you and the prohibitionists if you all vote exactly the same way? Pragmatically, none whatsoever. The state of Ohio doesn’t really care what your motives are. They just count the votes, they’re not weighed for intent, right?

            Do Ohio a favor and just sit this one out. Your attitude is the wrong one to have. The way you’ve been carrying on, trying to get under Jon’s skin… That’s some bitter tea you’re drinking, so stop sharing it.

          • eric

            Here comes another shill to the rescue. Jon is getting under my skin , with his aragant , I think I know it all , deceitful attitude , and now so are you. I have the freedom of speech and can think and feel how I want. I’m going to speak my mind and call this b.s. what it is and there’s nothing none of you are going to do to stop me. You don’t have a clue who I am so you and Jon have no right to speak on my character. I believe , better yet I know this is b.s. and any body with half a brain can see that. We can keep going if you want , but don’t tell me to sit this out I’m going to keep calling this what it is and I’m bringing as many to the polls with me to vote this down. You want to judge me , huh? Let me ask you this shill , what do they pay you guys. Quit passing this monopoly off as freedom. Sacrificing a free market to allow a select few to bankroll the whole industry and sell what ever garbage they want for what ever price they want , not to mention charging what ever they want for a license to grow 4 plants at home ( oh and let’s not forget to do it legally they will have you on record and Jonny law can walk in to inspect your home at any time) is not freedom. What’s wrong with Ohioans for cannabis? That’s freedom which will benefit everybody. Screw the r.o. cartel and all the other anti American and anti competitive shills trying to manipulate the people to support this b.s. Ohioans are smarter then you people give credit. You act like people who enjoy Marijuana and others who need it are dumb and will vote any old legislation into our Constitution just to smoke a joint.whats next , you will legalize prostitution if we give up our right to free speech. Sacrificing one freedom for another isn’t freedom buddy!

          • jontomas

            The more you shout “shill,” the more you show you are not interested in true dialogue. – Just getting your way.

            Sorry, consumers are starting to stand up and demand a place at the table. We’ll let you watch if promise to be respectful.

          • eric

            I’ll let you watch this b.s. monopoly fail and a much better proposal succeed next year. If you truely are for the consumer and not a shill you can thank those of us who had the intelligence and balls to do this right and protect and benefit everybody then.

          • jontomas

            No. If by some twisted, cruel fate, you succeed in causing the fail of Responsible Ohio, you will join the ranks of those who caused the same frustration of justice in California in 2015.

            Any greedy growers/vendors who cross the line to work against the people’s freedom, are no different than any other drug gang.

            I’m hopeful the people of Ohio will see through your vicious deception and pass Responsible Ohio for the freedom that is LONG overdue.

          • eric

            My reply to this is the same as above. Just because I support responsible ohioans for canabis and not r.o. doesn’t make me an enemy to the cause. It is imperative to use discretion when enacting legislation and I truely believe r.o.f.c. will be the best option for ohio due to the points I pointed out above.

          • jontomas

            A person doesn’t have to be an enemy to make a fatal mistake that can doom a struggle. – I agree it would be the better action, but it’s not really an option at this point. When you can show it has the capability of getting before the people, that will be different. Until then, to cast off Ohio’s REAL opportunity for freedom is insane.

          • wowFAD

            LOL… Just keep upvoting your own comments, Eric. It really shows how much you agree with yourself on this issue. I honestly feel sorry that Ohio must suffer you to first reform their laws. A true pity.

          • eric

            Lol . I haven’t up voted anything wow fad. There goes more accusations with no evidence to support it. I’m sure I’m not the only one who doesn’t agree with this proposal.

          • eric

            The more you shills speak the more clear it becomes that you have a financial interest in the legal cartel . You a******* don’t know me , quit telling me I have some sort of financial interest in r.o. failing. I don’t have any interest (financially ) either way! You people front like you care about the consumer , but your willing to sell ohio up the river for b.s. legislation just like the casino.

          • jontomas

            @eric – We ARE the consumers. You just don’t want consumers to have a voice in policy – as if the largest stakeholders had no right to participate.

            Better get used to it. Our voices will only get louder.

          • eric

            Your full of s*** and anybody with half a brain can see that. Most consumers I know see this for what it is and won’t be supporting this. We can keep going until November if you like , $ hill!!!!!!

          • newageblues

            All consumers don’t have the same interests. Some can easily afford legal cartel prices, some can’t. Some will be able to grow their own at home, some won’t. RO is a much better deal for affluent consumers than others.
            Once they start gathering signatures, chances to tweak their proposal will be over, and it may be a lot harder to change things than you think. The only reason you’re looking to the legal cartel to get legalization done in the first place is because it takes so much money to get an initiative onto the ballot, and the legislature of course is under the thumb of prohibs. You assume it can be improved later on in response to the will of the people. But there’s a lot of suppression of the will of the people going on around cannabis.

          • jontomas

            @newageblues
            >>>”Some can easily afford legal cartel prices, some can’t.”

            You underestimate the backers of RO. I’m certain they’re planning on serving ALL the market. Plus, Ohio is not an island. After the dust settles on re-legalization, average quality marijuana will probably sell for around $50 an ounce, or less. It’s just a plant.

            Do you think RO could sell marijuana that would end up costing the consumer $100/oz if all the surrounding states are at $50?

            >>>”Some will be able to grow their own at home, some won’t.”

            More like some will choose to do it and some won’t. They have automatic grow cabinets you can buy where all you have to is stick the seedling in, turn it on, and forget about it.

            But Americans like their convenience. Most will choose the corner store, just as most do with tomatoes.

            >>>”You assume it can be improved later on in response to the will of the people. But there’s a lot of suppression of the will of the people going on around cannabis.”

            And yet, here goes the country, flipping the prohibition out. You can suppress a group just so long. It’s clear the war on marijuana consumers is fizzling.

            Again, after we ended alcohol prohibition, we continued to refine alcohol policy until it reached it’s optimum form. Of course we will do the same with non-addictive, far less harmful marijuana.

          • wowFAD

            Never said you have a financial interest. I said your goal was antagonism from the onset. Since you’re now calling me a shill despite the fact that I’m well-known to be a Georgia resident, I rest my case. You’re so confused and consumed by your emotions, you don’t even know with whom you’re speaking, anymore, do you? Your bitterness and frustration are bleeding through far too obviously.

          • eric

            Sorry wow fad if you are not a shill , then I was out of line. I was getting irritated because strait from the get go Jon was insinuating I had some sort of financial interest in prohibition which is not true. I’m not going to keep going back and forth with you guys. You made your points and I’ve made mine. I’m all for legalization , but there are initiatives that are better that people need to take into consideration. I personally support responsible ohioans for canabis. I understand that it’s important to end prohibition and stop the hideous persecution of so many consumers, but in ohio it is decriminalized to the point where possession of up to 100 grams is nothing more serious then a speeding ticket. You can’t even go to jail for that. I’m not saying that’s good enough because it’s not and there shouldn’t be any penalties for consumption ( done responsibly) , but I’m saying that we should take our time and do this right. It’s not about ego , it’s about discretion. Once something ends up in the Constitution giving so much power to a few wealthy and powerful people it will be very hard to change. We just have to be sensible how we do this.

          • jontomas

            >>>”there are initiatives that are better”

            Russ Belville agrees with Ethan Nadelman that a bird in the 2015 hand is much better than two in the 2020 bush.

            https://www.facebook.com/radicalruss/posts/10205231764327040

          • eric

            Russ belville wasn’t saying that in the beginning…

          • jontomas

            Russ Belville responds to all the “controversy” in Ohio.
            ——————
            An imaginary conversation with Stoners Against Legalization – The Ohio Oligopoly Rejection

            ME: So, I understand you guys in Ohio might get to vote on marijuana legalization in 2015? How exciting! Who’d have thought you’d beat California?

            OHIO: Whatever. I’m not voting for that ResponsibleOhio bullshit legalization.

            ME: Huh? Why not?

            OHIO: It only allows for ten wholesale growers in the state, written into the State Constitution!

            ME: Oh. But does it legalize personal possession of marijuana?

            OHIO: Yes, one ounce.

            ME: Does it legalize home grows?

            OHIO: Yes, 4 plants and 8 ounces, but you have to get a home grow license.

            ME: Does it establish pot shops I can visit?

            OHIO: Yes.

            ME: Could I open one of these pot shops?

            OHIO: Yes.

            ME: What about edibles, tinctures, other processed marijuana goods, are those legal?

            OHIO: Yes.

            ME: Could I open up a business processing marijuana?

            OHIO: Yes.

            ME: So, marijuana would no longer be just decriminalized, it would be legal, which means drug dogs alerting for it wouldn’t be probable cause?

            OHIO: Yes.

            ME: And if a cop smelled weed on my person, that wouldn’t be probable cause to detain or harass me?

            OHIO: Yes.

            ME: And the ten to twelve thousand criminal arrests that happen in Ohio, even with decriminalization, would be greatly reduced without that probable cause, right?

            OHIO: Yes.

            ME: And you’re against all that?

            OHIO: Yeah, because it screws the little guy!

            ME: Worse than being arrested and raided or even getting a ticket?

            OHIO: Yeah, because only ten rich businesses could grow.

            ME: Legally. The guys growing illegally can still keep growing illegally; they’re not going to be busted any worse, are they? And, actually, the illegally growing guys are less likely to get caught, since they could get a home grow license and that would make it harder for cops to build a probable cause case that they’re growing illegally.

            OHIO: It’s bullshit. I support true legalization that supports the little guy!

            ME: Well, it sounds to me like under this ResponsibleOhio legalization, the little guy gets to smoke weed, have weed, grow weed, shop for weed, all without getting a ticket, an arrest, or a criminal record. Drug dogs would be decommissioned for weed, thousands would avoid an arrest, and millions in tax money would be raised. But you’d oppose that because the little guy can’t legally grow weed for a living.

            OHIO: It’s writing an oligopoly into our Constitution!

            ME: Yeah, and that sucks, but does it suck worse than 10,000 marijuana arrests per year?

            OHIO: We can do better than that!

            ME: Who’s this “we”? And do they have $50,000,000 to get on the ballot and campaign for their true legalization plan?

            OHIO: How much did ResponsibleOhio pay you? So whoever has the money gets to write the rules?

            ME: This is America; have you been paying attention to politics for the last half-century?

          • eric

            Funny thing is Russ belville in the beginning was up in roar again the responsible ohio proposal calling it the monopoly it is. t.hen all of a sudden switched up and then he makes the “shill coment” , maybe runs now has an interest in r.o. maybe he is a shill.

          • jontomas

            Thanks, wowFAD. It’s nice to know some have noted my unwavering position for many years.

            My ONLY goal has been to break the back of the monstrous war on marijuana consumers ASAP. The success of Responsible Ohio will not only free citizens there, but will be a major inroad to the Midwest and East.

            Combined with the victories of California and some other states in 2016, the fraudulent, crumbling federal prohibition will finally bite the dust.

          • wowFAD

            It’s actually been quite a trip down memory lane, in fact. We’ve had notable visits from a few folks I recall from the pre-A64 days, including visits from such notable personalities as “Donkey Hotay” and Kathleen Chippi. Ironically, Kathleen was demanding special treatment as a commenter on the weed blog because she “got us this far” in the battle to legalize cannabis, despite her efforts to have A64 taken off the ballot in Colorado. People like “Donkey” and Kathleen (and Eric) care more about their raging egos than any greater good. Hopefully, Ohio is able to shout down the Erics and Kathleens so they’re free to accomplish something next year.

          • jontomas

            Right. – Those folks are so ‘special.’ – They have a great little niche, though. Who else could come up with such an original group?

            “Reformers Against Legalization”

          • jontomas

            lol – Now I know you’re lying. If there’s one thing that’s obvious, it’s that I have no financial stake in any aspect of marijuana policy.

            People who buy their liquor from state-run stores don’t feel they are un-free.

            Neither do marijuana consumers care about who sells them their herb, and most are wise enough to know it will be some monopoly or other. That’s the way America works.

          • eric

            I’m not the liar Jon. You keep insinuating I have some sort of financial interest in Marijuana is a lie. You don’t know me and try to attack my character just because I don’t support your thinking and your organization (responsible ohio). My support goes to responsible ohioans for cannabis. No entity should be written into a constitution ensuring only a select few have complete control over an entire market , that is a tyranny. You said your self you should go with what ever offers the most freedom and that’s not r.o. your either confused or you are a hypocritic. Judge thy self before thy neighbor.

          • Ohio Voter

            Go Suck and Egg Jon

          • jontomas

            Not only are you clueless, you shout your ignorance. Tsk.

          • eric

            Hey shill , I don’t know who you think you are to pass judgement on me , I’m not the greedy one here , and I sure as hell don’t grow . Your greed driven responsible Ohio and you sellout , greedy , paid shills are the ones who are trying to throw consumers and farmers under the bus. A free market where competition will thrive will ensure quality , a fair price , and that supply will meet demand. Why are you so against a free market? Why do you want this monopoly locked into our Constitution so
            badly? You and your responsible Ohio are the ones putting lipstick on the pig and anybody with half a brain can see that. People don’t let this greed driven group and these selfish paid shills (trying to justify this b.s.) mislead you. It is not necessary to write a monopoly into our Constitution to legalize this. We don’t have to sacrifice one freedom for another. Colorado made it with out a monopoly and we will to. Don’t let these greedy scum bags mislead you.

          • jontomas

            Wrong. I’ve never made a penny off marijuana and never plan to. I just represent the average consumer – the voice that is being lost among all the profiteering.

            >>>”Why are you so against a free market?”

            lol – I’m not against a free market. I just observed the fact what we now have in the U.S. is not one. So it’s butting your head against the wall to demand a special, ‘really’ free market just for marjiuana.

            >>>”Why do you want this monopoly locked into our Constitution so badly?”

            There’s that word, “locked” again. If the Constitution were locked, we wouldn’t be able to make this change, would we? – The fact is, nothing is cast in stone. We will continue to refine marijuana policy just as we did with alcohol after ending ITS prohibition. It’s great we have all this variety of legalization plans with the different states. The best programs will soon emerge and then be copied by the rest of the states.

            The fact is, Responsible Ohio will free Ohio Marijuana consumers next year. That is such a monumental success, the production arrangement is a minor aspect.

  • Alex Thompson

    Medical marijuana . Not just today, but every day, give thanks for Herb is no doubt the back bone of a people, alcohol is the killer of these people.
    Recommended for relief and treatment of particular diseases. Add me now
    Some of these conditions include:
    1. Treatment for symptoms of AIDS (Berry White, Afghan Haze,Blueberry Kush)
    2. Cancer , Glaucoma , PTSD , Depression and Chron’s disease (Sour Diesel, Gils Scout Cookies, Grand Daddy Purple )
    3. Neuropathy (diseases affecting the nerves or nerve cells) Ex. epilepsy(Ace Of Spades, Snow Cap Strain)
    4. Nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy (Durban Poison, White Widow)
    5. Anxiety , Pain caused by structural or psycho-physiological disorders. (Amnesia Haze, OG Kush)
    6. Muscular spasticity and limb pain (multiple sclerosis or spinal cord
    injury) (Og Darth Vader, Cotton Candy, Purple Train Wreck)
    7. Symptoms of movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s
    disease, Tourette’s syndrome (Mango Kush, Lemon Drop, Lavender Kush)
    8. Appetite stimulant for diseases of malnutrition (cachexia or starvation) (LA Confidential, Northern Lights, Mr. Nice Guy)
    9. Nausea and vomiting (general) (Alaskan Thunderfuck, Gas Og, Skywalker OG, Red Stem Afghani)
    10. Migraine headaches. (Sweet Tooth, Super Silver Haze, Super Skunk, Purple Urkle)
    11. Bipolar (Strawberry cough, lambsbread, grape ape, Hawaiia skunk)
    Email : clintongranham@gmail.com

    • Edward

      Are you able to help people in need?

  • MrBelvedere

    What has made Responsible Ohio propose only ten licensed cultivators??? And then redraft it under pressure so home growers can have four plants. Are the polling numbers so bad that they think this is the only way it will pass? Why did they not follow the Colorado model?

    I would like to hear from those who have analyzed the drafts.

    • jontomas

      Every state has passed a different form of re-legalization. The importance is not where they are different, but where they are the same.

      The principal common achievement is ending the persecution of millions of good Americans who prefer near harmless marijuana over addictive, very harmful alcohol.

      Everything else is secondary, and the disparate systems will all evolve toward the states who have come up with the best policies.

    • eric

      Responsible Ohioans for cannabis have a much better proposal they plan to put on the ballot next year. It will ensure freedom for everybody . Any farmer or entrepreneur will have the legal right to get into the business at any level( including growing) which will ensure a fair playing field . This would ensure a quality product at an affordable price and will help meet demand and eliminate the black market quicker. I have read both proposals and what I see as obvious is responsible ohio doesn’t care about the consumer at all. They just want to write their entity in the Constitution giving them selves exclusive rights to grow and total control over the market. The beautiful thing about responsible ohioans for cannabis’ proposal it also calls for expungment of cannabis charges for people convicted of cannabis charges. As far as home grow one would be permitted to grow up to 24 plants indoors or out in a secure area with out a license.

      • jontomas

        There is no guarantee ANY proposal will make it to the ballot next year.

        Any marijuana consumer, or lover of freedom, would be INSANE to vote against any re-legalization initiative. That’s like saying, “Please continue to treat me as a criminal.”

        Nothing is ever cast in stone. – The passing of Responsible Ohio is the BEST and FASTEST way to get to the ideal marijuana policy.

        “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.”

        • eric

          The problem with r.o. is once it’s in the Constitution it will be very difficult to change. Like you said before Jon ( and you were right) you have to go with the proposal that frees the most people and that is r.o.f.c. another point you made is that all the in fighting won’t do nothing but hurt our cause. US string here passing judgement on each other and bickering back and forth isn’t helping the over all cause I’m any way. Enough is enough.

          • jontomas

            It will not be difficult. The MOST difficult thing is to end the fraudulent marijuana prohibition. There is incredible resistance from all who profit from the monstrous fraud. – Police, prosecutors, prisons, alcohol and pharmaceutical industries, drug testing and “treatment” industries, money laundering banks and the billionaire drug gangs themselves.

            Once we end marijuana prohibition, all those enemies of freedom lose their interest in marijuana. It will be relatively easy to adjust marijuana policy at that point. The states with the best re-legalization will emerge, and the rest will follow.

            I didn’t say “you have to go with the proposal that frees the most people.” Please don’t put words in my mouth. Because of marijuana’s near harmless nature, the only regulation it needs is to prohibit sales/giving to minors. – THAT would free the most people – but it’s not politically feasible at this time in history.

            People are naturally scared and confused by eight decades of the world’s largest propaganda campaign. We will give them restrictions similar to those alcohol has because it reassures them. With time, all will understand marijuana is not alcohol, does not present the problems of alcohol and appropriate adjustments will be made.

            Unfortunately, state initiatives are incredibly expensive. No other Ohio group has shown the capacity of raising the money necessary. What Responsible Ohio is asking in return for their funding is not excessive. It’s a good deal for everyone, even people like you who have let ego cloud their judgment.

            It’s amazing how much you can accomplish when you don’t care who gets the credit.

            You don’t avoid in-fighting by campaigning against the only strong legalization initiative on the horizon. That’s how you create it.

            We should all get behind RO, end marijuana prohibition in Ohio, and federally, and then help identify and adopt the best state legalization plans for the national model.

            That’s the quickest way to get to where even you want to go.

          • eric

            Don’t get me wrong Jon you do have many valid points and I don’t care who gets the credit , I just want the best legislation which will free and benefit everyone. Money definitely helps back a campaign of this nature but I honestly don’t think all of the other states where it has been legalized put together had to come up with the amount of money that r.o. is investing into this. So many people want this that whether the govt. And these other prohibitionist , ( who may I add are the true greedy scum who oppress our freedoms to line their pocket) , like it or not it’s going to have to pass. It’s up to us , the people to make the right choice and enact the best legislation that will benefit everyone. I still have to back the r.o.f.c. plan , and I respect your decision to back r.o. either way it’s about time that here soon the real b.s. ( prohibition of a harmless plant ) will be over…

          • jontomas

            Remember, millionaire prohibitionists like Sheldon Adelson are on the prowl. He single-handedly defeated Florida’s initiative to pass medical marijuana. The stakes, and costs, are rising all the time.

            Consider the value of unity.

          • eric

            I agree. Big govt. And big money are very powerful forces and the only way to make it is through unity.

          • jontomas

            Great. Now let’s bust out of this two-bit prison.

  • CalDayPerkins

    Please will you help us Recreationally Legalize Marijuana, in all of the States God, in all of our Cities, and in all our Countries, as well as the World, Please will you help us get back our rights of agency God? In the name of your Son Jesus Christ, who is our Brother, and the King of Kings, Amen.

  • eric

    No responsible monopoly!

  • Slippin Jimmy

    I prefer a free market. Not an oligopoly. Imagine the hundreds maybe even thousands of farmers that could grow hemp (hemp isn’t even in this shitty amendment) and marijuana. This amendment is by the rich for the rich, and they continue to get richer while the little guy suffers.

  • BlackR1

    “…How hard a license will be to get is unclear at this time.” And THAT’S the deal breaker. We’ve fallen for “vague language” before. The voters of Ohio passed a smoking ban believing that it OMITTED bars, clubs and other smoking-friendly venues only to be duped by Legislators who REWROTE the statute AFTER it’s passage to include those mentioned above, putting MANY out of business. Now, however, we’re to believe that those SAME legislators are going to do the RIGHT thing by making a license for a “home grower” easily obtainable? Don’t insult my intelligence.