colorado legalizes marijuana
Ending Marijuana Prohibition

States Ask Supreme Court To Find Colorado’s Marijuana Legalization Unconstitutional

colorado legalizes marijuanaBy Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

The states of Nebraska and Oklahoma have asked the United States Supreme Court to issue a declaratory judgment finding that Colorado’s laws regulating the state-licensed production and sale of marijuana to adults violates the US Constitution.

The suit, filed today by Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning and Oklahoma Attorney General E. Scott Pruitt, alleges that marijuana is being diverted into their states from Colorado, causing plaintiffs to suffer “irreparable injury.”

The Attorney Generals contend in their suit: “Plaintiff States are suffering a direct and significant detrimental impact – namely the diversion of limited manpower and resources to arrest and process suspected and convicted felons involved in the increased illegal marijuana trafficking or transportation.”

They are asking the Supreme Court to strike down Colorado’s law on the basis that it is “fundamentally at odds” with the federal Controlled Substances Act. They allege, “The diversion of marijuana from Colorado contradicts the clear Congressional intent, frustrates the federal interest in eliminating commercial transactions in the interstate controlled-substances market, and is particularly burdensome for neighboring states like Plaintiff States where law enforcement agencies and the citizens have endured the substantial expansion of Colorado marijuana.”

They seek “a declaratory judgment stating that Sections 16(4) and (5) of Article XVIII of the Colorado Constitution are preempted by federal law, and therefore unconstitutional and unenforceable under the Supremacy Clause, Article VI of the U.S. Constitution.” The US Attorneys are also asking the State of Colorado “to pay the Plaintiff States’ costs and expenses associated with this legal action, including attorneys’ fees.”

The suit does not ask for the Supreme Court to enjoin any other states’ laws regulating the production or dispensing of cannabis for either social or therapeutic purposes, though it is possible that the Court’s actions may have implications for those laws going forward. To date, four states have approved measures allowing for the regulated production and sale of cannabis to adults. Twenty-three states have approved measures allowing for the use of the plant for therapeutic purposes.

Colorado Attorney General John Suthers responded to the suit, stating: “[I]t appears the plaintiffs’ primary grievance stems from non-enforcement of federal laws regarding marijuana, as opposed to choices made by the voters of Colorado. We believe this suit is without merit and we will vigorously defend against it in the U.S. Supreme Court.”

Commenting on the suit, NORML Legal Counsel Keith Stroup said, “This suit is more political theater than a serious legal challenge. These two conservative state attorneys general know they are losing this fight in the court of public opinion, so they are hoping the Supreme Court will intercede.”

Stroup further noted that in recent days a majority of Congress approved language limiting the ability of the federal government to interfere in the implementation of state-sponsored marijuana regulatory schemes. He added: “The majority of Americans, including 55 percent of Colorado voters who endorsed this policy in 2012, support regulating cannabis in a manner similar to alcohol. The Attorney Generals pushing this lawsuit are not only out-of-step with existing public opinion and emerging political opinion, but they are also clearly on the wrong side of history.”

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  • jontomas

    This lawsuit is absurd. As experts have noted, marijuana consumption was widespread in every state before the recent re-legalizations. There is no “concern” for the citizens here. This is a desperate attempt to shore up the crumbling, counter-productive fraud of marijuana prohibition.

    Law enforcement and prosecutors profit hugely from this shameful war on millions of good Americans. The riches it yields them are astounding – millions of dollars in asset forfeitures, almost as much again in the federal bribe of “drug war” grants, easy overtime, easy arrests and easy promotions.

    420 Radio’s Russ Belville describes a searing example of Nebraska’s hypocrisy:

    “The tiny town of Whiteclay, Nebraska, population 10, holds the distinction of being the US town with the greatest beer sales per capita of any American town. This town of 10 has four licensed off-sale beer stores that sold 3.6 million cans of beer in 2013, or almost 10,000 cans of beer per day.

    How is that possible? Well, Whiteclay, you see, lies on the northern Nebraska border with South Dakota, where it directly abuts the Oglala Sioux (Lakota) Indian Nation on the Pine Ridge Reservation. And Pine Ridge has maintained absolute alcohol prohibition… [where] alcoholism affects an estimated 80 percent of their households, 60 percent of individuals, and nearly one quarter of babies born suffer from fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Nebraska can’t complain that Colorado is messing up their marijuana prohibition while Nebraska is openly flouting the Lakota Nation’s alcohol prohibition. Besides, unlike a beer store in Whiteclay, some pot shop selling on the Colorado / Nebraska border isn’t fostering domestic violence, dangerous roads, cirrhosis of the liver, and birth defects.”

    http://www.hightimes.com/read/nebraska-complains-about-colorado-weed-while-enabling-south-dakota-alcoholism

    • David

      Any lawsuit which comes before a court in the arena of American jurisprudence is a huge gamble for any defendant, it’s truly a roll of the dice. It’s 7, or snake-eyes.

      • jontomas

        True. That’s why I’m spending much effort on enlightening people about this event – instead of just dismissing it for the puerile prank it is.

  • jontomas

    This lawsuit is absurd. As experts have noted, marijuana consumption was widespread in every state before the recent re-legalizations. There is no “concern” for the citizens here. This is a desperate attempt to shore up the crumbling, counter-productive fraud of marijuana prohibition.

    Law enforcement and prosecutors profit hugely from this shameful war on millions of good Americans. The riches it yields them are astounding – millions of dollars in asset forfietures, almost as much again in the federal bribe of “drug war” grants, easy overtime, easy arrests, easy convictions and easy promotions.

    420 Radio’s Russ Belville describes a searing example of Nebraska’s hypocrisy:

    “The tiny town of Whiteclay, Nebraska, population 10, holds the distinction of being the US town with the greatest beer sales per capita of any American town. This town of 10 has four licensed off-sale beer stores that sold 3.6 million cans of beer in 2013, or almost 10,000 cans of beer per day.

    How is that possible? Well, Whiteclay, you see, lies on the northern Nebraska border with South Dakota, where it directly abuts the Oglala Sioux (Lakota) Indian Nation on the Pine Ridge Reservation. And Pine Ridge has maintained absolute alcohol prohibition… [where] alcoholism affects an estimated 80 percent of their households, 60 percent of individuals, and nearly one quarter of babies born suffer from fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Nebraska can’t complain that Colorado is messing up their marijuana prohibition while Nebraska is openly flouting the Lakota Nation’s alcohol prohibition. Besides, unlike a beer store in Whiteclay, some pot shop selling on the Colorado / Nebraska border isn’t fostering domestic violence, dangerous roads, cirrhosis of the liver, and birth defects.”

    • Outlaw420

      I can not believe I live in such a backwoods redneck state. I have news for okla attorney general . We been getting weed here long before colorado made it legal. All this is a ploy to raise our taxes and put more money into fighting a losing battle. Give it up the war on pot is coming to a close and those in power need to understand the people are fed up with the draconian ways of the past. What needs to be done is Obama to get off his lazy ass and change the it schedule 1 and give the people what they want like he promised 4 years ago

      • Denny

        Wow, you get it!
        Amazing how many people still don’t understand that the entire ordeal could be put to rest if “O” would actually come through on any one of his numerous promises over the years to reschedule it. But odds are…

        • David

          As stated above I’d urge President Obama to wait until one minute before noon January 20, 2016 before signing a bill to reschedule cannabis. giving the hater’s who’ve tried to destroy his Presidency, since the strike of noon Jan 20 conniption fits. I don’t mind him waiting until the last minute. After eight years let the Obama hater’s eat cake if they believe what comes after is going to be better.

          • been there

            Not “reschedule”, DEschedule! It doesn’t belong on the CSA period.

          • David

            Baby-steps. There powerful and wealthy opponents who exist whether we like it or not. They will become more visible as the 2016 elections draw near.

          • Outlaw420

            Go and read the Barbra Walters report when asked point blank o Bama darted the question and another interview he said it wasn’t up to him but congress. And how many executive orders has he put thru and didn’t get congress approval? And as far as Oklahoma not voting for him maybe we saw thru his bullshit.

          • David

            Those opposing the President’s re-election squeal loudest when he hasn’t done something they want.

      • David

        President Obama could perhaps be considered ‘Lazy” in some strange white conservative Oklahoman alternate universe. Taking a look at the international news of this past week the irony isn’t lost on me, and hopefully nor the President, that those who have done everything in their power to oppose and thwart his Presidency, suddenly see the light when it comes to one issue they deem important enough for them to jump onto the Obama bandwagon. This issue being of course Cannabis rescheduling. The Obama hater’s a large majority of whom represent the State of Oklahoma. A state in fact where not ONE Oklahoma county voted in favor in either of his two elections to high office (the only state in the Union to hold this dubious distinction). Those voices coming from Oklahoma, screaming the loudest when he isn’t suddenly acting as fast as they think he should on their behalf, in order to suit their single issue concerns. I’d go so far as to urge the President to wait until one minute before Noon, January 20, 2016 to address rescheduling cannabis. It being the primary concern of those who have called into question this Presidents legitimacy since the strike of noon January 20, 2008.

        • jontomas

          Actually, it’s quite possible Obama is doing everything he can to help marijuana reform.

          I think many people confer more power to the presidency than it actually has.

          Polarization is the operative word of our times. Obama has devoted most of his energy trying to salvage some iota of bipartisan energy to get things done. That the divide has only grown wider is a testament to the near impossibility of that task.

          The limitations on Obama’s power is nowhere better seen than in the actions of that rogue agency – the DEA. Despite Obama’s attempts to reign in their persecution, they have blithely continued with their precious war on marijuana consumers.

          Their performance in front of congressional hearings, where they can’t even admit to the truth about marijuana’s harms relative to heroin is astoundingly revealing.
          There is only one solution to the problem of the DEA. That is to dismantle it. – Their very existence is an abomination to humanity.

          When history looks back at this period (I call the American Inquisition) they will likely describe the numerous ways Obama nudged this country toward the end of this monstrous witch-hunt.

          • David

            100% in agreement. Well put.

      • Sarijuana

        Do you think that this may be a wake up call to some people in OK who don’t want their taxes spent in this fashion? I hope so. Could be a blessing that these idiots have engaged in such nonsense. #Backfire

    • MrPC

      You bring up a point I hadn’t considered. Instead of whining about the tidal wave of illegal reefer coming into their states from those drug-crazed liberals in Colorado, why don’t they just monetize it? Hell, I’d think about building little towns right on the border, just so I could hire police departments and collect fines!

      • jontomas

        Right. Actually, that’s basically what they do. They’re just crying about legalization because they’re afraid it will spread to their state and cut off their river of blood money.

  • States can’t be forced to enforce Federal Law. Let the Feds enforce it.

  • Cyndysub

    Feds nolonger have the money to conduct raids so unless they are willing work for free their goose is cooked. They can ask all they want but that doesn’t mean the court will even hear the case.

    • wowFAD

      I’ve been trying to make this as public as possible: everyone who keeps saying “they can’t fund raids” is 100% wrong. The spending bill restricted the DOJ from spending funds, but most of the money that funds the drug war comes from the $25 billion budget of the ONDCP. The ONDCP puts $7.7 billion into domestic law enforcement every year, which *includes* the $2.4 billion budget for the DEA, and $70 million for the US Attorneys who prosecute for them. The spending bill “victory” was a cheat nobody wants to own up to.

      • 2buds

        Not to mention the aprox $1 Billion annual take from legally stealing all the money and possessions from users, growers, etc. – civil forfeiture!
        They got money they haven’t even used yet!

        • wowFAD

          Correct. The ONDCP’s budget includes, specifically, over $200 million set aside for asset forfeiture cases — not money being brought in, money being SPENT on them.

      • David

        wowFAD a great deal of discretion is still going to to be left to Federal DOJ prosecutor’s. Those living in anti-cannabis states having no medical marijuana laws and still actively incarcerating individuals for even small possession crimes Will contuse to do so regardless of what these the rider’s to the omnibus budget bill say. I don’t believe anythings going to change geographically different than what is occurring now.

        • wowFAD

          For me, personally, nothing will change. I live in Georgia. Despite the fact one of our Congressmen sponsored the amendments for sections 538 and 539, Georgia is not listed among the protected states, in any case. My concern is for the states *with* medical cannabis, now. The patients and providers in those states are being lulled into a false sense of security because people in the reform community are overwhelmingly *inferring* that the DEA and US Attorneys are funded through the DOJ, and not the ONDCP. I’m not worried about myself — my state will not see whole-plant access for a little while, yet. I’m worried about the people who are going to have their current access snatched away from them because of archaic punitive policy enforced by thugs with zero compassion. It’s going to be a deep-felt body blow for cannabis activism when the DEA raids start back up, uninhibited.

          • David

            The age of the West coastal states having passed medical marijuana supplies another thin veneer of protection at least California-1996/ Oregon 1998/ Washington 1998/ Alaska 1998 so there is some precedent and thankfully Switzerland and Israel were not pressured by the US to abandon cannabis scientific research unless it proved a negative result they could use to discredit it. Land of the free? On a side note I was doing family research today and traced my mothers family to an area close to Savannah Georgia. My Swiss Ancestor was hired as a mercenary in Saint Gallen Switz. to help guard the large rice plantations around Charleston South Carolina in 1731. They migrated to Georgia in 1759.The Revolutionary Battle of Brier Creek was fought on my Great (7th) Grandfathers land. I didn’t know!

          • Kathleen Chippi

            “The patients and providers in those states are being lulled into a false sense of security because people in the reform community are overwhelmingly *inferring* that the DEA and US Attorneys are funded through the DOJ, and not the ONDCP.”

            You say this after attacking me the way you have? Because this is exactly what I have been in the CO courts for the last 4 years trying to prevent from happening because the world thinks cannabis is legal in CO and it is not–and not because I say so ( I am merely the messenger who read all the language including A64) but because the COURTS say so–4 times now in the CO Court of Appeals. The courts say the language does NOT LEGALIZE. And the language was written by “people in the reform community” NOT to legalize.

            People out here are quietly losing jobs, occupational licenses, unemployment, child custody, gun rights, assets, student loans, gov. aid, housing, banking, organ donation qualifications and freedom over cannabis USE/cultivation/transportation.

            And just like you said it’s because of “people in the reform community are overwhelmingly *inferring*”. Yes, they (ASA/NORML/MPP/DPA/NCIA) are “inferring” and setting people up to be screwed. Just like they LIED to voters and the world that CO or WA have legalized. “people in the reform community are overwhelmingly *inferring*” so much so no one read A64 or 502.

            The government loves everyone in the world thinking CO has legal pot. This is the best sting operation they could ask for and they are added by “people in the reform community” and the media and the misinformed public.

            We already know CO has it’s data. Their July 9, 2014 DoR MJ ‘report’ is very telling. Collecting exactly how much and what a person buys and how often and even how much each buyer consumes on a daily basis. Amazing. And right into the CCIC and NCIC (CRIMINAL) computer databases. Brilliant. So even when you come from out of state–IF you shop in any licensed storefront, you are also now in the criminal database system. The license REQUIRES the data cllecting on behalf of law enforcement in order for them to be licensed. Even better these people pay outrageous ‘licensing’ (protection) fee’s and are actually paying the gov. to be informants on their entire customer base.

            It sure would be nice if “people in the reform community” (ASA/NORML/MPP/DPA/NCIA) stopped “*inferring*” things that can harm people and ruin their lives.

          • wowFAD

            I’m so glad to know that, while the rest of us were with our loved ones for the holidays, you were skulking around the internet *still* bitter over the trouncing I gave you. It sure is nice to know you were ALONE as a consequence of being a raging turncoat. Poor, poor Kathleen. Nobody loves you!

          • Kathleen Chippi

            lol, — keep trying confused christian, wowfad.

            Your comments prove me correct in my actions to stop they lying about A64, you loser.. “The patients and providers in those states are being lulled into a
            false sense of security because people in the reform community are
            overwhelmingly *inferring* that the DEA and US Attorneys are funded
            through the DOJ, and not the ONDCP.”

          • wowFAD

            LOL! Right, Kathleen. Because you have to be Christian to have people in your life who want to spend time with you… Yup, the reason you were all by yourself is because you’re too evolved for relationships with other human beings. Or, what’s more likely, you’re a fat cow nobody loves. The reason you chose to spend that night stalking MY comments is that my open disdain is the closest thing you have to affection in your sad life. Well, my comments and donuts, right? Know how I’m sure there’s no God? A merciful deity would have dropped a house on you, by now. Perhaps I should pray to the Wizard of Oz for that to happen. Of course, it’ll have to be a BIG house. Anything less than 1200 square feet will probably just get lodged in your back fat.

      • Cyndysub

        Go study some more

        • wowFAD

          Wow — that’s denial on a truly petulant scale. Why don’t you go study more? Start with Section 538 of the spending bill, then google for the ONDCP’s FY2015 budget. STUDY those, yourself, and tell me what I got wrong.

          Or I suggest changing your avatar pic — Velma would be ashamed of how you’re sprinting *away* from the evidence.

          • Cyndysub

            Whatever

          • wowFAD

            Yep, that’s what I thought.

      • Kathleen Chippi

        oh wowfad and I can agree on something…..

        when it comes to funding, have you noticed that is was ASA leading fraudulent marketing of what their language did (we know, didn’t really do) and then it was picked up nationwide and repeated by all media and their friends over at the other ‘prominent’ supposedly pro reform drug groups like NORML/MPP/DPA?

        I know I got emails asking me for money to help get it passed to end the federal war on MMJ. After it passed I got emails asking for more money for their success of “quietly ending the federal war on MMJ”.

        Now there are millions of people who are misinformed and who now, because they have been misinformed, could do things that will put themselves in unnecessary harms way. That can ruin their lives. And this is why I cringe every time I hear a person say or print that cannabis is legal in CO or anywhere–because it’s not and it’s not me saying this it’s the state courts.

        • puckerbrushsage.

          You obviously have never been to Colorado. When an issue ‘wins’ by ballot initiative in Colorado, the legislature is required to amend the State Constitution within the first session after adoption. Some towns and cities, like Colorado Springs have declared themselves ‘home rule’ cities and can prohibit the ‘right’ anyway, but they will end up in the State Supreme Court.

          • Kathleen Chippi

            lol — yeah, just living here for the last 25 years and fighting for everyone’s pot rights in the courts for the last 4…..

            “Some towns and cities, like Colorado Springs have declared themselves
            ‘home rule’ cities and can prohibit the ‘right’ anyway, but they will
            end up in the State Supreme Court.” lol

            More like A64 ALLOWS ANY town or municipality to ban A64 businesses–which is exactly what voters passed…-so maybe you should start your education with reading A64? so sad you have so little understanding of the laws and then try to sound like you do.

            And towns/cities don’t just get to “declare themselves home rule”–which is an entirely seperate and non related issue to the A64 bans…

    • puckerbrushsage

      Cyndy, the feral court system and the prostitution absolutely LOVE to piss away a few million bucks of our money to arrest, convict and imprison each of a million and a half people a year. The biggest industry in the country is building prisons. And even if the congress allows the government to shut down, all their people keep right on getting paid. And top that off with a conviction rate in the high ninety percent range. That’s why I’ve lost faith in our system.

  • Bic

    I hope they are prepared for the very public and embarrassing smack-down they’re going to get just like Amy Dumbitchski in Anchorage! HA! Who’s laughing now!

    • David

      Having sat on many jury’s in my time (including first degree murder and arson trials). And due to some surprising and unexpected outcomes I considered unlikely at the time. I will never underestimate the stupidity of the American court system again, either from the very top to the depth’s of the very bottom. Whatever in brought before a court, be it murder, or regulatory scheme’s, a court is always a roll of the dice and should be a concern to all of us until the outcome is determined.

      • puckerbrushsage

        Especially when the stupid assed juries don’t know their rights and responsibilities. Like the sheeple they tend to sit who do exactly as the judge tells ’em to. They’ll convict some poor bastard of growing a little ganja when the law allows or mandates a sentence longer than murder. I wouldn’t be quite so proud of having sat on a jury in this age of tyranny.

  • Scott Eaton

    2 asshole states and Jon Bruning is even a bigger asshole

  • Karen Ferguson

    This is downright ridiculous. What a waste of money!! My husband gave me an analogy. He said, “When I was a kid, the drinking age in Washington DC was lower than the state of Maryland. There were a bunch of liquor stores on the DC/MD line catering to customers who were of the right age in DC but not Maryland. Nobody sued DC to match the laws in Maryland [or Virginia!]. Another note, we live in CA. If we don’t like the gambling laws in Nevada, do we attempt to put an embargo on those flying from San Francisco to Las Vegas?
    The point: OK and Nebraska are tying to dictate and regulate what happens within Colorado’s borders.
    I’m hoping the Federal court throws it out, tells them to solve it between themselves and quit wasting the taxpayers money.

    • Drake

      I live in NV, and gambling eases our taxes. Its pretty nice actually.
      Once we get weed, well have guns, gamblin, brothles, and weed.

      Murica.
      Hahahaha it does feel like the wild west out here but as a free creature of this earth I wouldn’t have it any other way.

  • Bill Johnson

    People like this are the reason the Goverment is 18 trillion in debit!What the hell is wrong with this dam culture,it seem to be ok to spray tobacco with thousands of deadly chemicals and smoke it !Our nation is ran by brain washed TARDS straight up,just like this town i live in called MONTROSE COLORADO!

    • Denny

      Actually, it’s the administration that’s been on a spending binge for the past few years.
      I have no problem assisting people who are legitimately handicapped or have lost their job due to no fault of their own such as a company going out of business or cutting back due to a decreased demand for their goods and services.
      However, I’m not a fan of the “freebies” that have dramatically spiked essentially removing the
      incentive for people to find a job and actually earn a living rather than becoming a
      lifelong taker.

    • James Argetsinger

      You can add Butte County to your list

      • puckerbrushsage

        Yeah and how about Colorado Springs passing a city ordinance prohibiting the will of the people? The drug laws were never about drugs anyway. The shitfinishes gotta prove over and over that they are the biggest gang in town. And obscenely overpaid.

  • Uncle Arthur

    Is there any way that these two states can be expelled from the union?

    • ted mishler

      i want to upvote you, but the thought of possible negative blow back is something id rather not face
      why is it so common to be so drama?
      why can’t people live and let live
      its such a waste of time we spouting conflicting points of view
      whats the difference if i can think of a point of this or that the thing is in the enjoyment of every moment is the thing, and i think i read too much of the sad news stories:-)

      • Uncle Arthur

        I was being facetious.. I know that there are people of very good will in Oklahoma and Nebraska who feel that this is insane. It’s best if Oklahoma and Nebraska focus on their own plate and rethink the insanity and the inhumanity of cannabis prohibition. That would be best for all.

    • puckerbrushsage

      LOL. Who would we have to laugh at without the cornshuckers and the okies ? The Ponca tribe has land in Carter Lake Iowa, a geographical anomoly surrounded by a thin strip of Nebraska who sued Iowa AND the tribe because gamblers would use their roads. I would suggest Iowa sue Nebraska over the stench of their slaughterhouses drifting eastward ! Fuck Nebraska and Oklahoma. And especially fuck the feds.

  • Fr33dom

    I haven’t read the law suit, but how is Colorado breaking any laws? The illegal supply of weed to these other states is not created by Colorado. If OK and NE have an actionable cause, it is with criminal weed smugglers, not CO voters. Regulation diminishes, not creates the illegal market. Lastly, demand in NE and OK is what creates supply, not CO regulation.

    • David

      These states AG’s aren’t necessarily interested in the what happens to the state of Colorado. They want this lawsuit kicked up to the SCOTUS, where it’s unclear how the Robert’s Supreme Court would rule, if at all.

      • puckerbrushsage

        Remember the incredibly lame excuse Roberts gave when declaring Obummercare Constitutional ? You’ve surely read about that Supreme court decision where the baker, growing his own small quantity of wheat was declared within the feral government’s authority because his wheat ‘could’ effect interstate commerce ? That decision gives the asses legal authority to tell you what you can grow in your garden. I remember when young John Suthers, then running for DA in Colorado Springs based his whole campaign on fighting the war on drugs. Of course it is his job to defend the state. Don’t trust the feds. They’re looking for any reason to prove themselves sore losers. A friend with cancer getting chemo finally got pain meds prescribed by the VA only after signing a contract that he will not use cannabis or he’ll actually be cut off. Talk about sore losers.

  • Sinclair

    There they go palming a wise state Goverment for there own short comings in not seeing the future of legal marijuana. Colorado should sue them for wasting their time.

  • MrPC

    I like the last couple of sentences from the Denver Post editorial on the subject: “Nebraska and Oklahoma are straining to find arguments against a law that they don’t like in a neighboring state. Sorry, but it’s none of their business.”

  • khh

    I’d be willing to bet the ranch that marijuana going into NE and OK from CO is not coming from licensed growers. It’s coming from Mom & Pop operations growing small numbers of plants indoors. A person could stay within the allowed growing limit, which I think is 6 plants at a time, and still make a decent amount of tax-free income on the black market.

    What are the feds going to do about the fact that citizens in CO are allowed to grow a few plants indoors? The answer is, not a bloody thing. I am also glad to hear the CO Attorney General told OK and NE to pound sand.

    • Kathleen Chippi

      “A person could stay within the allowed growing limit, which I think is 6
      plants at a time, and still make a decent amount of tax-free income
      on the black market.”

      6 plants makes “a decent income on the black market”? lol

      • khh

        I admit to no experience in this area, but couldn’t a person pocket a few grand of tax-free income on the black market in the course of a year with 6 plants? If so, I would think that would be enough incentive to make it worthwhile.

        • Kathleen Chippi

          I guess it depends on what someone thinks is a good profit for the risk. Is a few grand a year worth an interstate commerce charge from the feds when they could just get rid of it here, instate especially as concentrate.

          If you were in CA or OR and you could grow outdoor plants where you could get 3-8 pounds a plant maybe but here in CO most cannabis is grown indoors and a 1000 watt bulb will get someone 1-3 pounds a light–not a plant. And in CO it is supposed to be 3 vegging plants and 3 flowering-not 6 flowering plants. People usually put 3-6 plants under one light. The out of state ‘black market’ income would hardly be worth it if they consume cannabis themselves. Pounds (of quality bud) out here are now 1,800-2,400.

          If they took the chance to move it out of state at such low quantities before (fake) legalization (A64) in 2012 then they may still do it but not because of A64-because they had friends or family out of state prior and this is their way.

        • puckerbrushsage

          Stop it, yer KILLIN’ me !

  • ted mishler

    the states that hate cannabis wants to maintain their hate for the cannabis community through their discriminatory practices of urination to prevent a fine member of the cannabis community from obtaining any employment, so why not reverse it, so that all those who are applying for employment will only find work if they test positive for thc, let the cannabis haters shuffle through the bread lines, let them go to their local community kitchen. let them be the ones who are told what is on their plate to eat, they discriminated first, now, we get to gloat:-)
    so there

  • John Sergovich

    Why is it that the States stated out with jurisdiction over all aspects of cannabis use and production when the union was formed, but today, the federal government claims that right?
    I’m not any expert in law, but I do remember some history and I noticed that around the time when the League of Nations was formed, the individual States all began enacting various laws to restrict the use of the crop. I believe that it was the States that asked the federal government to get involved so that they could better enforce their laws. With a federal law on the books, the United States joined the League and it became the United Nations.
    I believe the important point here is that the States asked the federal government for help or at very least they all consented to it. How else can you give up a right unless you’ve consented? If that is the case, maybe some States might consider giving Washington formal notice that they revoke their State’s consent to any federal restriction that interferes with their own cannabis policy.

  • jeff snyder

    why don’t those states try to catch real criminals instead of going after the weed….oh, i know why…its because they are pussies and afraid of real criminals