May 222013
 May 22, 2013

thc dui driving marijuana cannabis nanogramsAnyone who consumes cannabis on a regular basis knows that it doesn’t make you a dangerous drive. To many people, it makes them a safer, more focused driver that’s more aware of their surroundings and the dangers associated with controlling tons of gasoline-filled metal. Not only has this been an anecdotal truth for as long as cars and cannabis have been paired, science has also been clear that consuming marijuana doesn’t make you a dangerous driver, and may in fact make some people safer drivers. More research is needed, but it’s hard to deny that of the research we have, marijuana hasn’t been found to increase a person’s risk of an accident.

To back this claim up, here’s a list of studies and research conducted on this very topic, some of which were funded by national governments in hopes of different results. (Sources are hyperlinked).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: The Joint Blog

About Johnny Green

Johnny Green is a marijuana activist from Oregon. He has a Bachelor's Degree in Public Policy. Follow Johnny Green on Facebook and Twitter. Also, feel free to email any concerns.
  • Cyrus Palmer

    Thank you for this! Most of the non-smokers that are in favor of legalization all seem to want a legal limit for driving, or a no tolerance while driving policy. I find it absurd. My driving record has improved substantially sense i became a smoker.

  • http://www.facebook.com/scott.eaton.31 Scott Eaton

    I want the DEA out of it because it affects my CDL….1 week after I stopped smoking I was told I had diabetes….it was a natural cure for me…..I want to smoke again to reverse my diabetes

  • Nick

    You should perhaps do a grammar and spelling check on an article pertaining to such an important issue in this country. Within the first two sentences are enough errors to make me wonder if this was written by a 12 year old.

  • Denny

    You’re joking, right? Surely you don’t truly believe that driving while high is safe. There’s no way your reaction time is comparable to your non-high condition. Actually, I don’t know why anyone would want to get behind the wheel when they’re in a perfectly relaxed condition as opposed to easing back in your recliner and enjoying it.

    • Krymsun

      Drivers who had been using marijuana were found to drive slower, according to a 1983 study done by U.S. National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA). This was seen as a factor in their favor, since drivers who drank alcohol usually drove faster and that is part of the reason they had accidents. Marijuana users were able to drive straight and not have any trouble staying in their own lanes when driving on the highway, according to a NHTSA study done in 1993 in the Netherlands. The study determined also that the use of marijuana had very little effect on the person’s overall driving ability. Drivers who had smoked marijuana were shown to be less likely to try to pass other cars and to drive at a consistent speed, according to a University of Adelaide study done in Australia. The study showed no danger unless the drivers had also been drinking alcohol. Drivers high on marijuana were also shown to be less likely to drive in a reckless fashion, according to a study done in 2000 in the UK by the UK Transport Research Lab. The study was done using drivers on driving simulators over a period of a month and was actually undertaken to show that pot was a cause for impairment, but instead it showed the opposite and confirmed that these drivers were actually much safer than some of the other drivers on the road. Marijuana smokers are thought to be more sober drivers. Traffic information from 13 states where medical marijuana is legal showed that these drivers were actually safer and more careful than many other drivers on the road. These studies were confirmed by the University of Colorado and the Montana State University when they compared a relationship between legal marijuana use and deaths in traffic accidents in those states. The studies done by a group called the Truth About Cars showed that traffic deaths fell nine percent in states with legal use of medical marijuana.