Sep 132014
 September 13, 2014

marijuana alcohol accidents drivingBy Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

Nearly 60 percent of Americans support regulating cannabis in a manner similar to alcohol, according to an analysis of over 450,000 online responses collected by the online polling data company CivicScience over a nearly two-year period.

Fifty-eight percent of respondents said that they would support “a law in [their] state that would legalize, tax, and regulate marijuana like alcohol?” Thirty-five percent of respondents said that they would oppose such a change in law.

An analysis of responses provided within the past three months found even stronger support for legalization, with 61 percent of those polled endorsing marijuana law reform.

Democrats, men, and those respondents between the ages of 25 to 34 were most likely to support regulating cannabis.

Though the CivicScience survey is not a scientific poll, its findings are similar to those previously reported by Gallup in 2013. In that poll, 58 percent of respondents similarly backed legalizing marijuana. More recently, in April, national polling data published by the Pew Research Center reported that 54 percent of Americans support legalizing the plant.

Source: NORML - make a donation

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  • wowFAD

    By this time in 2016, it will be a solid 2/3’s majority. And not just a survey, but national polling will show it. The tide has come in, and we’re either already at or just beyond the fabled tipping point (as far as public opinion is concerned). Polling trends have been headed this way for over a decade. Lawmakers will have until November 2016 to get aboard with cannabis law reform or risk being voted out of office, for good.

    Watching the push for medical cannabis in Florida has me biting my fingernails, however. Polling is still in favor of the initiative, but the numbers, bizarrely, have started slipping. My concern is that the opposition has thrown so much at the wall to see what sticks that some of their nonsense is sticking with some voters. The University of Florida’s medical school, after all, is Kevin Sabet’s base of operations — big pharma bought him a faculty position, there. If Florida tips, I’m fairly certain big pharma will shift their strategy from “staunch opposition” to mitigating their losses in a war that’s already been decided (which will probably entail firing Kevin Sabet).