Jun 032015
 June 3, 2015
new york medical marijuana

(via wikipedia.com)

What is the status of medical marijuana in New York? How can one get a medical card or a dispensary license? How can we end racially biased marijuana arrests in New York? Will NY tax and regulate marijuana like Colorado and Washington? Come get the answers to these questions and more. Join the Drug Policy Alliance, along with leaders in the marijuana industry, policymakers, experts, and patients to get an insider perspective on the state of marijuana policy reform in New York. Learn about New York’s new medical marijuana program and plans to legalize marijuana for adult use and to rebuild our communities devastated by marijuana prohibition.

What: Fundraiser — VIP reception and program to discuss New York’s marijuana policies and emerging industry

When: Thursday, June 4th: 6pm VIP Reception | 6:45pm Doors open for general admission | 7:00pm Program

Where: deepak homebase on the mezz of abc home. 888 Broadway at e 19th St.

Who:   Assemblyman Richard Gottfried, sponsor of the Medical Marijuana law; Senator. Liz Krueger, sponsor of Marijuana Regulate and Tax Act; Assemblyman Robert Rodriguez, sponsor of Fairness and Equity Act (decriminalization); Senator Daniel Squadron, Fairness and Equity Act (decriminalization); Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance; gabriel sayegh, Managing Director of Policy & Campaigns; Drug Policy Alliance; patients and family members in need of medical marijuana; New Yorkers who have been arrested for marijuana possession; and leaders in the cannabis industry.

Background

Last July, after an eighteen year fight, Governor Cuomo finally signed New York’s medical marijuana bill — a victory for patients, families, and those in New York who believe our drug laws need serious reform. But the bill was narrowed considerable by Governor Cuomo in the final days of negotiations and has been further restricted through the regulatory process. Now all eyes are on implementation: how this program is implemented will directly impact patients and could determine the future of the marijuana industry in New York for years to come.

And beyond the law passed last year, legislators have introduced proposals to fix New York’s marijuana policies, including bills that expand New York’s medical marijuana law, create an emergency access program for critically ill patients, further decriminalize marijuana, redress some of the harms caused by marijuana prohibition, and tax and regulate marijuana in a manner similar to alcohol.

Join the Drug Policy Alliance, along with leaders in the marijuana industry, policymakers and patients at this educational fundraiser to get an insider perspective on the state of marijuana policy reform in New York. Learn about New York’s new medical marijuana program and hear about plans to legalize marijuana for adult use and to rebuild our communities devastated by marijuana prohibition.

This fundraising event will support the ongoing work of DPA to fix New York’s broken marijuana polices.

To RSVP and for more information please follow this link: http://www.drugpolicy.org/events/reform-new-york-state-marijuana-policy

Source: Drug Policy Alliancemake a donation

Comments

comments

About Johnny Green

Dissenting opinions are welcome, insults and personal attacks are discouraged and hate speech will not be tolerated. Spammers and people trying to buy or sell cannabis or any drugs will be banned. Read our comment policy and FAQ for more information

  8 Responses to “Thursday: Everything You Wanted To Know About Marijuana Reform In New York”

  1.  

    We need action taken at the federal level to get Marijuana removed from schedule 1 immediately.

    •  

      Its not gonna happen if Kevin Sabet interferes.

    •  

      We need action taken at the federal level to get Marijuana removed from the CSA immediately.
      .
      There – fixed it for you. You’re welcome.

      •  

        We need progress. Rescheduling cannabis would sure as hell be real progress. It’s not like rescheduling precludes descheduling further on down the road.

        •  

          How is it progress when you can still be thrown in prison. Some of us don’t have the time left to wait for x number of years.
          .
          Rescheduling is kind of like buying new seat covers for a car with a burnt out engine.

  2.  

    Getting it off schedule one makes it possible to do massive amounts of scientific research to prove that it needs to be descheduled further. Basically the only reason there isn’t masses of published research is that it’s on schedule one. Give it one year and there would be enough research published in peer-reviewed journals to win a court case…

    •  

      Removing it from the CSA accomplishes the same thing. No more baby steps.

      •  

        Of course removing it entirely would be better. But we don’t have enough influence yet to even get it rescheduled, though we’re probably getting close. And it’s more than a baby step.

 Leave a Reply