Aug 182015
 August 18, 2015
2016 election marijuana

(via chsarrow.com)

I received the following update from the Marijuana Policy Project:

We wanted to provide you with a quick update on the ballot initiative campaigns in Arizona and Massachusetts that MPP is sponsoring. As you probably know, MPP was responsible for the successful campaigns that ended marijuana prohibition in Colorado in 2012 and Alaska in 2014. The campaigns in Arizona and Massachusetts are targeting Election Day November 2016. We’re very excited to continue this work, as ballot initiatives are a proven method for changing laws when politicians fail to take action. For the third election cycle in a row, MPP will be playing a leading role in providing voters the opportunity to end marijuana prohibition in their home states.

Arizona

The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol is currently collecting the 150,642 signatures required to qualify for the 2016 ballot. To be safe, the campaign will need over 230,000 signatures.

It has been a strong start, collecting over 50,000 signatures in just 10 weeks, and the campaign is now expanding its volunteer signature gathering operation across the state. The groundswell of support from voters across Arizona has been very encouraging.

The campaign has also been staying in the news: the following links show coverage of the campaign reaching 50,000 signatures, as well as a recent op-ed from a member of the campaign who is also an emergency room physician.

Visit regulatemarijuanainarizona.org to learn more, get involved, or make a donation to the campaign.

Massachusetts

In Massachusetts, the Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, sponsored by Marijuana Policy Project (separate and distinct from the Arizona campaign), filed its ballot initiative last week with the Massachusetts attorney general for review. Here is a local story about the filing. Soon, the campaign will begin the process of collecting 64,750 signatures from Massachusetts’ voters, as well as building a coalition of individuals and organizations to support our campaign through Election Day next year.

This is going to be a high profile campaign — next year in Massachusetts there will be no statewide elections (for U.S. senator, governor, lieutenant governor, etc.), and it is very unlikely that Massachusetts will be contested in the presidential election.

Visit regulatemass.com to learn more, get involved, or make a donation to the campaign.

If you want to support these campaigns with a contribution, and help end prohibition in these states, please visit the respective campaign websites and donate online. If you have any questions, simply reply to this email.

We’ll continue to keep you updated on these campaigns over the next few months.

Comments

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  5 Responses to “Updates On The Arizona And Massachusetts Marijuana Legalization Campaigns”

  1.  

    There are 2 competing ballot initiatives in AZ. The MPP plan, gives those who gouged everyone on MEDICAL marijuana prices, a monopoly on selling after legalization. MPP initiative STILL contains FELONIES for having over 1 oz in your possession at any one time. It doesn’t deal with past marijuana convictions or people now in jail for marijuana. There’s SO many BAD things in the MPP initiative. I will be voting AGAINST the MPP initiative. I’m scared SHITLESS that the SAME thing that happened in Washington will happen HERE if the MPP initiative passes!

    I don’t TRUST MPP in the least! I USED to, but after watching the track record of MPP initiatives and the results AFTER their initiative passes. EVERY ONE of MPP’s initiatives are tired up in court our being dismantled by a legislature.

    Finally, after listening to ALL the people running for President on BOTH sides, I have legitimate concerns about what our NEXT President will do! EVERY initiative from here on out should be required to include a clause that…

    “TOTALLY PROHIBITS State and Local Law Enforcement Agencies from participating in ANY Federal action or RAID on marijuana homes or businesses within the borders of that State!

    That’s the ONLY way that we can keep the next President from reneging on ANY progress we’ve made on marijuana law reform. If the State & Local LEA’s are prohibited from participating in Federal Marijuana raids in their States. It will cause the legalization of marijuana in D.C.!

    That’s the exact way that alcohol prohibition was ended. State and Local LEA’s QUIT participating in Federal Alcohol raids. When that happened, it became clear the Feds didn’t have enough time, money NOR personnel to successfully investigate and enforce Federal Laws!

    •  

      The D.E.A.’s profit sharing program with local law enforcement makes it highly unlikely local PDs will opt out of continued participation.

      •  

        I understand what you’re saying. That’s why we don’t give them the OPTION of whether they participate in the raids.

        That’s why I say it MUST be written in the language of the initiative when it goes to vote. If the initiative passes with that language in there, they will be REQUIRED by law, to not participate in those raids. The people of the State establish what laws ARE and AREN’T enforced within their boundaries.

  2.  

    Mind you I am biased, but it makes no sense to me that further initiatives/measures/issues/proposals would follow any other model than the Oregonian one. Of legalization that is on the books, it is the most fair in terms of tax distribution, it was suppose to uphold the medical program as it currently stood, it gives home growers the chance to implement a quasi tomato format for growing [with limitations, but no regulation and no registration], the transport of products from one city or county to the next is legal [so providing your area opts out you can still legally participate in recreational use without fear of being pulled over and being incarcerated], and the amounts one is able to keep on hand are very reasonable.
    Those items alone should be adopted by all future legislation. Furthermore, the additional components the joint committee on implementing 91 came up with regarding functional testing of cannabis [pesticides/potency/herbicides/etc] and early recreational access via medical dispensaries, along with a recent ruling by the Oregonian Appeals Court that smell ordinances are not viable, should also be added to every piece proposed from here on out.
    Someone else has done a wealth of the work for these folks; It baffles me that other state movements aren’t just outright stealing these great ideas.

  3.  

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/BayStateRepeal/

    Bay State Repeal constructed the nation’s simplest and least restrictive plan for marijuana law reform focused on preventing non-medical distribution to children. To explore public opinion, Bay State Repeal presented public policy questions around the state in the election of 2014. Read more about that here:http://baystaterepeal.org/2014/11/release-voters-in-six-districts-approve-of-regulating-the-cultivation-of-and-commerce-in-marijuana-by-persons-over-the-age-of-21-as-an-agricultural-product/

    We are preparing to collect signatures for our initiative petition so it will be introduced into the Massachusetts legislature in January 2016. That is the first step to the ballot in 2016.

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