Dec 142012
 December 14, 2012

show me cannabis regulation missouri smcrThere are numerous states that are likely to see marijuana reform efforts during the 2014 election cycle. A lot of states have actually had some type of signature gathering efforts, or even introduced legislation that went no where, several times before, so a lot of these efforts are not new. However, with Colorado and Washington State ending marijuana prohibition in 2012, the political landscape has changed dramatically. Missouri is a state that I would like to see join Colorado and Washington. I have friends there that have gone through some tough hardships due to the harsh marijuana laws in Missouri. Below is a message from the Show-Me Cannabis Regulation campaign that sheds some light on whether or not 2014 will be the year Missouri ends marijuana prohibition:

Show-Me Cannabis Regulation’s Board of Directors continues to explore the possibility of a 2014 campaign, and we have agreed to take some of the initial steps towards launching such an endeavor. We plan on submitting a number of slightly different initiatives to the Secretary of State in the near future, with the hopes of raising the funds to poll all of them after we receive the official ballot language. If those polls show that there is a strong possibility of victory in 2014, then it increases the possibility that we can raise substantial funds based upon that information, and put it before the voters. If, on the other hand, the polls show that a strong legalization measure will not pass in 2014, we will not invest substantial resources into attempting to qualify a measure for the ballot in 2014. Instead, we would spend 2013 and 2014 working on local reforms in key localities, pressing the legislature for meaningful reforms such as expungement of cannabis offenses, and holding educational events across the state.

If the conditions are right to end cannabis prohibition in 2014, we will be prepared to seize that opportunity. Still, we must recognize what is politically possible at the moment and what is not, so if victory appears unlikely, we will conserve our resources, focus on education and winnable local reforms, and set our sights on 2016. Conventional wisdom says that marijuana reform measures perform substantially better in presidential election years, and that has no doubt been true for many years. On the other hand, support for legalization is growing rapidly and may even accelerate with the victories in Colorado and Washington, so the conventional wisdom may be dead on arrival by 2014. With conditions changing so quickly and dramatically, we believe that the best way forward for the time being is to be prepared both to run in 2014 and to wait until 2016. That way, we will not miss an opportunity to win if it arises, but neither will we expend precious resources on a losing effort if it doesn’t.

We sincerely appreciate our dedicated and hard-working volunteers and supporters. We will continue to consider your input and keep you updated with developments. With such a strong foundation of support, and the continuing education of voters, we are confident that cannabis prohibition’s days are numbered. Thank you all so much, and if you would like to push us a little closer to victory, please consider donating today!

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About Johnny Green

Johnny Green is a marijuana activist from Oregon. He has a Bachelor's Degree in Public Policy. Follow Johnny Green on Facebook and Twitter. Also, feel free to email any concerns.
  • Johnny Bloomington

    I think there is a better chance of Oregon passing legalization in 2014. I live in Missouri and I think you would be better off focusing on education than thinking Missouri is going to legalize it in 2014. A lot of people here don’t even have good internet service to educate themselves. You have to appeal to the Conservative base here. Would love to see Missouri do what Colorado did but Missouri can’t regulate crap. What happen to Springfield? Any news there?

    • http://www.facebook.com/trixter.phillips Trixter Phillips

      I’m not sure what the future holds for us Missourians, although I am not confident in Show-Me Cannabis accomplishing much of anything unless they finally get their shit together.

      To answer your question, Springfield’s city council passed the initiative, for the most part, so they could gut it and keep the voters from passing actually passing the measure.

      • Johnny Bloomington

        Show-me cannabis may have good intentions but the money just isn’t there. Well if you live in the Springfield area then vote those clowns out!

        • Johnny Bloomington

          Update…Show-me cannabis has recently done a great job pushing for St. Louis to get decrim.

    • Melekalikimaka

      That’s the key, huh? Internet access. Wouldn’t it be nice if someone suggested that fiberoptics get laid so that rural folks can get high speed internet in order to keep up?

      • Johnny Bloomington

        Reality is you can not lay fiber or copper down in rural area’s due to cost. The provider would not make back their money. The “key” is weed education though whatever means available.

  • Deb B

    I sre ould vote to legalize marijuana i Misouri if given the chance. I have a lot of friends that would vote the same way as well.

  • Madness Unstoppable

    I’m surprised at all the Southern states people are thinking “might” be next… sorry, Misouri, Georgia, Kansas, Arkansas, the Carolinas, all those kinds of places will be last. Expect California, Oregon, Montana, Nevada and all of New England (and New York) to change before the south does.

  • Melekalikimaka

    2014 is a nice thought but a major election would get the young people out there voting. That was part of the success of the Washington state and Colorado campaigns. Some of the help was setting up a Medical Marijuana system first, then as people see the sky doesn’t fall, get legalization on a major election ballot. I’m afraid all I hear is that the Southern States, which magically became conservative republican states 13 years ago, legislatures are waiting for a Federal level go ahead, before considering any Cannabis legalization. I believe the population is also waiting for political leaders to say it’s okay first as well, before voting on a ballot measure. If your reps say no, so follows the population. You have a large conservative population that still considers Reefer Madness a modern documentary and still call it Devil Weed.

  • Chelsey

    Yeah, it wouldn’t surprise me that the southern states would be the last to end the prohibition. Too conservative around here, but I still have high hopes that YES WE CANNABIS. Haha.

  • adhd

    It gives us great pleasure to announce the end of Prohibition both in the South and beyond! Join us March 15 & 16th, 2013 in Atlanta, Georgia for a time of training, strategizing, and empowerment. We are uniting to produce change in our antiquated marijuana laws. The Southern Cannabis Reform Conference is a two day event. Our speakers and panelists will discuss a wide variety of issues surrounding the decriminalization of cannabis; including, the detrimental effects of marijuana prohibition, the overpopulation of prisons and jails, discrimination in marijuana laws and enforcement, violations of human rights, the impact of marijuana laws on families, minorities and our nation’s youth.

  • Highguy

    Join the 52%er’s. “No more two term politicians until Cannabis is fully legal”.

  • MedicatedSolider

    Lets fully legalize Missouri!!!!!!!