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I Think Martin Luther King Jr. Would Be Proud Of The Marijuana Reform Movement

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mlkMartin Luther King Jr. has been admired in my family well before I was born. In virtually every house in my family, there are pictures of Mr. King hanging on the walls, and quotes plastered on everything from coffee mugs to school projects. Martin Luther King Jr. was an amazing person, and I am delighted to celebrate his life and achievements on Martin Luther King Jr. Day every year.

As a cannabis activist, I often wonder what Martin Luther King Jr. would think of the marijuana reform movement. I like to think that not only would he be proud of the reform movement’s victories, but that he would have been a cannabis activist himself. I don’t think that Mr. King was a cannabis consumer, as there’s zero evidence that he ever consumed marijuana at all. But supporting marijuana reform is much more than just being a consumer and fighting for your personal right to consume.

I’m happy to say that I know a lot of people that support marijuana reform, yet have never consumed cannabis. Those people support marijuana reform because they support equality, because they support compassion, and because they support social justice. Those of course are all things that Martin Luther King Jr. stood for too.

Martin Luther King Jr. stood up for what was right, even when it wasn’t popular, and even when it meant risking everything. His efforts are what ultimately cost him his life. To say that Martin Luther King Jr. is honorable and amazing is one of the biggest understatements of all time. Marijuana activists should strive to be like Mr. King. Marijuana activists should be willing to risk it all in the name of truth and justice, even when it isn’t popular or easy, and especially when it isn’t popular or easy.

On MLK Day remember why you fight for reform, and strive to be more like Mr. King. Below are some of his quotes, all of which I feel apply to the battle to end marijuana prohibition:

The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.
 
Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.
 
Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?
 
Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.
 
In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.

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