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Marijuana Policy In Oklahoma

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oklahoma marijuanaOklahoma Marijuana Policy

Oklahoma is a bad place for marijuana laws. I remember posting to an Oklahoma Facebook group page, and a guy called me a ‘frito chip eating hippie’ and told me to never post on that Facebook group again, and that marijuana has no place in Oklahoma. I don’t know if that attitude is representative of other people’s views in Oklahoma or not, I will leave that to the comments section. Below are Oklahoma’s current marijuana laws, courtesy of Oklahoma NORML:

Decriminalized? — No.

Possession of any amount (first offense) is a misdemeanor, punishable by 1 year in jail and a fine to be determined by the judge. Diversion is possible to substitute for the jail time.

Possession of any amount (subsequent offense) is a felony, punishable by 2-10 years in prison and a fine to be determined by the judge.

Cultivation of 1,000 plants or less is a felony, punishable by 2 years to life in prison and a $20,000 fine.

Cultivation of more than 1,000 plants is a felony, punishable by 20 years to life in prison and a $50,000 fine.

Distributing less than 25 lbs is a felony, punishable by 2 years to life in prison and a $20,000 fine.

Distributing 25 lbs to 1,000 lbs is a felony, punishable by 4 years to life in prison and up to a $100,000 fine.

Distributing 1,000 lbs or more is a felony, punishable by 4 years to life in prison and up to a $500,000 fine.

Distributing any amount to a minor is a felony, doubling the penalties in each category.

Distributing any amount within 2,000 feet of a school, public park, or public housing is a felony, doubles the penalties in both categories, and requires that the offender serve a mandatory 50% of their jail term.

Possession of paraphernalia is a misdemeanor, punishable by 1 year in jail and a fine between $1,000 and $10,000 (depends on the number of previous offenses).

Any conviction results in suspended driving privileges for 6 months to 3 years.

In addition to the above penalties, offenders have to pay a $100 dollar fee to the ‘Trauma Care Assistance Revolving Fund.’

Any type of financial assistance (state, federal, scholarship, etc.) for higher education can be terminated due to any conviction. In other states, the feds require this, but this is a rare case where the state will also deny your assistance.

Medical Program? — No.

Want to help reform marijuana laws in Oklahoma? Below are some good places to get started, via our Oklahoma activism page:

Oklahoma Marijuana Policy Project
http://www.mpp.org/states/oklahoma/

Oklahoma Americans for Safe Access
http://www.safeaccessnow.org/article.php?id=252

Oklahoma NORML Chapters
http://norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=4558&wtm_view=chapter

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