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‘No On 64’ Campaign Spreads Lies About Colorado Teen Marijuana Use

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colorado amendment 64Anti-Marijuana Propaganda Is Being Spread Around Colorado

We have our work cut out for us. For more than 40 years, government officials and other people who profit from keeping marijuana illegal have spread lies to scare Americans into supporting the irrational policy of marijuana prohibition.

Now that our campaign to end marijuana prohibition in the state of Colorado is taking off, the lies are starting here.

Exhibit #1: Laura Chapin, spokeswoman for the No on 64 campaign. In response to the unveiling of our new billboard yesterday, Ms. Chapin said in the Denver Post: “Marijuana use has increased among teens in Colorado, and Amendment 64 would only accelerate that increase.”

Sorry, Ms. Chapin. That is simply not true. In fact, if she took the time to visit the url on the billboard — www.RegulationWorks.org — she would see that marijuana use among teens has dropped significantly since Colorado enacted regulations to control the sale of medical marijuana.

To win in November, we’ve got to stand up and challenge every single lie like this one. So we need you to take action. Here are two things you can do:

The truth. That is the greatest weapon at our disposal in this election and is our key to victory. Please use it.

Thanks,

Brian Vicente & Mason Tvert
Co-Directors, Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol

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Johnny Green

16 Comments

  1. If you notice, the only real opposition comes from government sources. That’s because their very existence depends on this being illegal. There’s a direct conflict of interest when law enforcement or government officials oppose legalization – it’s because 90% of their work depends on busting people for marijuana!

  2. Not only are they spreading lies, but now they’ve made it impossible to leave comments on their facebook page or their website. I can’t understand how any organization would think it was a GOOD idea to establish a FB page and then block commenting… shows just how full of lies they really are if they can’t even allow people to leave comments out of fear that someone might write the truth!

  3. I’m more concerned about kids being taught hate rhetoric as part of their “Religious” training. People who hate always find a way to justify it.
    These people are the equivalent of the Taliban, religious fanatics!

  4. Duncan20903 on

    A swing and a miss! Gosh Mike you should be ashamed of yourself. The correct answer is “when their lips are moving”.

    Just kidding Mike. Keep up the good work. You’ve put a nice size crater in the wall.

  5. Usually, within the first two sentences they’ll float “The Children” Red Herring. Whenever you hear “The Children: from them, they’re in Full Propaganda Mode!

  6. 2012 GET THE PARTY STARTED RIGHT NOW! MAKE MARIJUANA CANDIDATES MORE
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    _____________________________________________________________________
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    and NJ Weedman http://tlmp.org The Legalize MARIJUANA Party of New Jersey
    _____________________________________________________________________
    You can collect “pass the hat” donations of amounts under $50. and
    send them in a money order to the candidate’s committee, with a note of
    how many people put money in the hat, and your name and address.
    The purpose of this guide is to encourage citizens, like yourself,
    to take an active part in the Federal election process.
    You might want to hold a fundraising party or reception in your home, or in a church
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    at the event are not considered contributions if they remain under certain limits.
    These expenses on behalf of a candidate are limited to $1,000 per election; expenses
    on behalf of a political party are limited to $2,000 per year. (A husband and wife may
    each spend up to the limit. Their combined limits would be: $2,000 per candidate,
    per election, and $4,000 per year for a political party.) Any amount spent in excess
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    Fundraising Tickets and Items
    Yet another way of making a contribution is to purchase a fundraising item
    or a ticket to a fundraiser. The full purchase price counts as a contribution.
    If you pay $100 for a ticket to a fundraising event like a dinner,
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    There are several ways you may support Federal candidates
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    These activities, however, are subject to the
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    For example, the law limits the amount of money
    you may contribute and prohibits certain people
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    This guide explains how to participate in Federal elections
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    It is important to note that the guide focuses on political activity
    in Federal elections–not State or local.
    Federal elections are those for the President and Vice President
    the U.S. Senate such as Cris Ericson http://usmjp.com
    United States Marijuana Party of Vermont,
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    such as Ed Forchion http://tlmp.org Legalize Marijuana Party of
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    How Much May Be Contributed
    Your contributions to Federal candidates and committees
    are limited under the law.
    You, the contributor, and the committee to which you give
    are both legally responsible for making sure that your contribution
    does not exceed your contribution limits.
    The paragraphs below list the contribution limits for individuals.
    Contribution Limits
    An individual may give a maximum of:
    -$2,500 per election to a Federal candidate or the candidate’s
    campaign committee.
    -$5,000 per calendar year to a PAC.
    This limit applies to a PAC (political action committee)
    that supports Federal candidates.
    (PACs are neither party committees nor candidate committees.
    Some PACs are sponsored by corporations and unions–trade,
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    do not have a corporate or labor sponsor and are therefore
    called nonconnected PACs.) PACs use your contributions
    to make their own contributions to Federal candidates
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    Prohibited Contributions
    While most individuals are free to make political contributions,
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    Foreign Nationals
    Foreign nationals may not make contributions in connection
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    Federal government contractors may not make contributions
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    under contract to a Federal agency, you may not contribute to
    Federal candidates or political committees. Or, if you are the sole
    proprietor of a business with a Federal government contract,
    you may not make contributions from personal or business funds.
    But, if you are merely employed by a company (or partnership)
    with Federal government contracts, you are permitted to make
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    The law also prohibits contributions from corporations and labor unions.
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    Fundraising Tickets and Items
    Yet another way of making a contribution is to purchase a fundraising item
    or a ticket to a fundraiser. The full purchase price counts as a contribution.
    If you pay $100 for a ticket to a fundraising event like a dinner,
    you have made a $100 contribution
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    Or, if you pay $15 for a T-shirt sold by a campaign, your contribution
    amounts to $15 (even though the T-shirt may have cost the committee $5).
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    Personal Services
    An individual may help candidates and committees by volunteering personal
    services. For example, you may want to take part in a voter drive or
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    In volunteering your services, you may use your home for activities benefiting
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    a contribution. You may also use a church or community room, if the room is regularly
    made available for noncommercial purposes, without regard to political affiliation.
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    or community room. Your costs for invitations and for food and beverages served
    at the event are not considered contributions if they remain under certain limits.
    These expenses on behalf of a candidate are limited to $1,000 per election; expenses
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    each spend up to the limit. Their combined limits would be: $2,000 per candidate,
    per election, and $4,000 per year for a political party.) Any amount spent in excess
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    If you are an employee, stockholder or member of a corporation or labor union, you may
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    If you are in the business of selling food and beverages, your business may offer
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    Businesses, including corporations, may support candidates in yet another way.
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    with respect to a given election, you must file a report with the Federal Election
    Commission (either FEC Form 5 [PDF]), or a signed statement containing the same information).
    Because this brief explanation does not cover all you need to know about
    independent expenditures, contact the Commission for more information.
    Acting as a Group
    If you and other individuals act together as a group to conduct activities to influence
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    In general, a group that raises or spends over $1,000 per year to influence
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    reports on the committee’s activities.
    If you are interested in forming a group to participate in Federal elections
    and anticipate raising or spending more that $1,000 during a calendar year,
    you should write or phone the Commission and request materials to register
    the group as a political committee.
    http://www.fec.gov
    Campaign Finance Information
    The Federal campaign finance law requires many participants in the election
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    If you contribute more than $200 to a committee, the committee is required to use
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    The Commission’s Information Division answers questions on the Federal campaign finance law.
    Call or write the agency (see below); FEC staff are waiting to help you.
    Federal Election Commission
    999 E Street, N.W.
    Washington, D.C. 20463
    Telephone: 202-694-1100
    Toll Free: 800-424-9530
    TDD (for the hearing impaired): 202-219-3336
    E-mail: info@fec.gov
    Federal Employees and the Hatch Act
    Although the Hatch Act does not prohibit contributions, it does ban
    or restrict certain partisan political activities conducted by Federal employees.
    Some Federal government agencies place additional limits on the
    political activity of their employees. For more information, contact
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    U.S. Merit Systems Protection Board
    1730 M Street, N.W.
    Washington, D.C. 20036
    Telephone: 202-653-7143
    Toll Free: 800-854-2824
    ________________________
    UNITED STATES MARIJUANA PARTY IN VERMONT
    http://usmjp.com
    ________________________
    THE LEGALIZE MARIJUANA PARTY IN NEW JERSEY
    http://tlmp.org

  7. Duncan20903 on

    Is there a reliable method for determining when a prohibitionist parasite is lying?

  8. liquor is the gate way drug to our sick society im sure we all drank first but 90%of our great lushatician protect the real social drug booze and let it destroy lives of our children,and need a billboard for that saying may cause auto accident ,cirrosis of the liver ,murder,fights shootings,divorces.rapes,child molestation ect,ect.

  9. They should use a Recorded Field Sobriety Test to determine DUI. We have that technology now, and the court can see the drivers condition as it was when first apprehended. This method works for ANY and All intoxicants.

  10. i would think society should worry about kids being subjected to gays and and all the other anti bible antics this president and his motive to bring down this country,when false crimes are intilled in the minds of the public to only cover the secrets crimes against our great nation. is nothing more than criminals and bankrupting the parents of all the children is a true crime,were not sheeple were people whom have to count on elected officials to do there jobs,i dont believe anything we vote for or against matters at all the department of justice is a joke we rent our fedral building from the japenese who sold it to them and why ?

  11. She sounds like she is trying to instill fear in people – irrational fear not based in reason, but based in an emotional fear for the safety of ones children and grandchildren. This is the same type of fear spread be Hearst, Dupont and Anslinger in the 30’s. It worked for them! Caused the congress to pass Marijuana tax act – despite the opposing rational and scientific and medical opinions of the time.
    You had better get a handle on this before the fear takes ahold.

  12. nygratefulfred on

    Thats how they do it-scare the Sheeple into voting against their best intrests with scare stories,misconceptions,negative connotations and innuendos,and outright lies.People who make money off of keeping Marijuana a crime will not hesitate to do all of the above,if they told the truth or used facts,they are out of business.

  13. Great article, you summed it up perfectly:
    “To win in November, we’ve got to stand up and challenge every single lie like this one. So we need you to take action.”

    We must fight this reefer madness misinformation at every turn in public fourms. Amendment 64 is polling at 61% for, but we musn’t stop until after the votes are tallied. Colorado has the opportunity to be the straw that breaks the camel’s back that is 75 years of Federal prohibition.

  14. You folks should put Chapin up on a billboard with the label – “Shameless Liar!”

  15. I gotta ask WHY didnt you all write in laws mandating scientific research be used to find the dui limit? When your state HAS BEEN FIGHTING 5 nanogram limit for two years.

    That being said ANY amendment that takes steps to legalize it in any manor is worth voting for.

    Because if we wait for ppl.like laura to listen to science we’ll get nowhere

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