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Utah Spent Tax Money To Find Welfare Drug Users, Only Found Nine

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utah drug test testing welfareBy Phillip Smith

Last year, Utah joined the handful of states that have passed laws mandating drug tests for people seeking welfare benefits. To avoid constitutional challenges, the state created a screening process to come up with a reasonable suspicion that certain welfare applicants were using drugs.

But preliminary data reported by the Salt Lake Tribune shows that of 4,425 people screened for drug use after seeking aid, only 813 were deemed to be at high risk of drug use, only 394 were actually subjected to drug testing, and of those, only nine were denied benefits because they tested positive and five are undergoing treatment.

The state spent more than $26,000 to achieve these results. It spent more than $5,000 to administer the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory (SASSI) test to applicants and more than $20,000 to pay for drug testing. Those figures do not include staff costs to administer the SASSI test or the costs of drug treatment.

Of the 813 SASSI test-takers who ranked high, more than 300 tested negative, 163 chose to abandon the aid application process and 137 were denied eligibility based on other criteria. Others had false positives or incorrect SASSI scores or failed to show up for the drug test.

The SASSI Institute claims its diagnostic test is 94% accurate at detecting people with a high probability of substance abuse, but the Utah numbers belie those claims. Of those assessed as likely drug or alcohol abusers by the test, only 1% actually tested positive for drugs. In the best case — assuming that everyone who abandoned the aid application process or didn’t show up for a drug test was actually using drugs — the predictive value of the SASSI test was under 50%.

“It seems silly to drug test hundreds. It’s not worth the money they’re spending,” Gina Cornia of Utahns Against Hunger told the Tribune, adding that welfare workers could still screen clients for substance abuse the old-fashioned way — by forging relationships with them.

Geoffrey Landward, deputy director for Utah’s Department of Workforce Services, wasn’t ready to draw any conclusions.

“People can read the numbers and make their own conclusions,” Landward said. “This was a policy decision made by the legislature, signed into law by the governor, and our responsibility is to execute as best we can.”

Article From StoptheDrugWar.org - Creative Commons Licensing - Donate

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